Copperbelt Energy Corporation Plc HY2008 Interim Report

first_imgCopperbelt Energy Corporation Plc (CEC.zm) listed on the Lusaka Securities Exchange under the Energy sector has released it’s 2008 interim results for the half year.For more information about Copperbelt Energy Corporation Plc (CEC.zm) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Copperbelt Energy Corporation Plc (CEC.zm) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Copperbelt Energy Corporation Plc (CEC.zm)  2008 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileThe Copperbelt Energy Corporation Plc (CEC), a member of the SAPP and listed on the Lusaka Securities Exchange, is a Zambian incorporated power transmission, generation, distribution and supply company and a major developer of energy infrastructure in Africa, respected for its skills in designing and operating transmission systems. CEC owns, operates and maintains power transmission, generation and distribution assets servicing customers in Zambia and the DRC, and is one of the largest international power traders in the region.last_img read more

Read More →

Rory Sutherland – the secret and sacrifice behind his rise to the top

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS When he had first played for Scotland, Sutherland was hammered for being overweight, they wanted him to ‘lean up’ a little bit. So during his rehab, along with relearning how to walk, the player decided to change his diet.“Everyone that plays rugby is only human. Everyone wants to indulge themselves and have that happiness of eating a crappy meal because they know how that feels. But rugby is a team sport and it’s about how every individual conducts themselves every day. What you put in your body is a massive part of that.“One of my goals was getting into better shape, eating right. I became obsessed with it. I was eating the right things every day and every meal was a task completed, an achievement. Eating right when you want to eat all the crap is still one of the hardest things I do in life. But it’s making that change from average player; they said if you want to take your game to the next level this is what you need to do and I did.”He hasn’t completely eradicated his fondness for ice cream, chewy sweets and, his go-to cheat meal, meat-feast pizza with pineapple and mayonnaise. But the discipline is there now and there is evident satisfaction as he describes what’s going into the chicken wraps he has planned for tea later that day.Passing fancy: Sutherland moves the ball for Edinburgh. He revels in the open spaces as well as the tight (Inpho)No such considerations existed when he was growing up in Hawick, playing for the high school on Saturdays and for Hawick Albion the next day. His parents met in the mills. Dad Steven, a centre for Hawick, later joined the police; his mum is now a nurse. They go to all of Rory’s matches, regulations permitting.“I’ll never take the support I get from my family for granted, it’s amazing. A lot of players in Scotland don’t have family (doing that) and it makes me appreciate it more when you know you have yours at the games watching.“My papa (granddad) used to be a selector for professional teams in football. From that he started to scout for rugby players for the Borders clubs. He is not very mobile now. Since I made my breakthrough to international rugby he has only been able to make it to one game.“My granny has passed, bless her soul, she was another of my biggest supporters. Their house was in Wilton Dean, at the top of the hill from where the rugby pitch was. Every Friday night I used to stay over before walking down to the pitch the next morning.”A flanker in his youth, Sutherland only made the switch to prop at 18. Hawick didn’t have a technical scrum coach so he had stints at Biggar and Gala, where he started to master the trade under former Scotland prop George Graham. And there was another passion too.“I competed in motocross and in my younger years missed some (rugby) games on a Sunday because that’s when race meetings were. One year I finished third in the Scottish & English Championships. But Mum and Dad didn’t have the money for me to pursue motocross as a career, it was costing them a fortune.“We were turning up to meetings with an old van and a trailer and one bike. And you’ve got guys turning up in big fancy motorhomes with three bikes and a whole entourage, so we realised we were out of our depth. Rugby was the sensible option.”On your bike: motocross action in Lanarkshire, a sport Sutherland excelled at (Loop Images/Getty)His life has seldom followed a conventional path. Despite starting all four of Scotland’s Six Nations matches this year – the remaining match against Wales is on 31 October – he played second fiddle behind Pierre Schoeman last season at Edinburgh. Starts against Wasps and Bordeaux around Christmas helped his match fitness but he admits he was “apprehensive” when making the transition to Test rugby at the start of this year.“I feel my scrummaging has come on a lot in the past two or three years working with Cockers (Richard Cockerill), and then with that short stint I had working with Pieter de Villiers in the international squad,” he says. “A big thing I’ve added is scrum endurance – being able to scrum well the whole time I’m on the park. It’s something I’ve been working on a lot, my technique, working as an eight, using the guys around me to get in good positions.“The way we trained (in the Six Nations) it didn’t matter who we came up against, whether it was Tadhg Furlong, Kyle Sinckler or (Giosuè) Zilocchi in Italy, nothing changed. You’ve got to believe in what you do and what the coaches are telling you. If you have that buy-in you’re going to get good outcomes. Like we did in the Six Nations.”Zilocchi, in particular, had a torrid time against the Scot, conceding a series of straight-arm scrum penalties before being replaced after half an hour.Blue collar: on the hoof against England at Murrayfield (Getty)Victory in Cardiff would give Scotland a third successive championship win and a probable third-place finish in the table. Does he see them as a contender for the next World Cup?“Yeah, absolutely. Everything’s moving very positively in the right direction. It’s a great environment and 90% of your way to being a successful team is everyone getting along and training hard and being there for each other. The way we played in the Six Nations shows how good a team we can be and how good a team we’re going to be in future.”And is the 2021 Lions tour in his sights? “If I’m fortunate enough to play a lot of rugby and play well, hopefully that would be a possibility. But you can’t get lost in your end goal, you’ve got to work, you’ve got to work. You’ve got to work through the little footsteps and do those things well to be able to reach that.” Rory Sutherland – the secret and sacrifice behind his rise to the topOn his days off, Rory Sutherland sometimes goes coarse fishing at Hawick with Edinburgh team-mate David Cherry. They’ll put out a dead weight and a float, pull up a chair and while away a few gloriously tranquil hours. “Where we go to fish is very picturesque, it’s beautiful. We just sit in the peace and quiet all day. Get away from the world,” says Sutherland.As he waits for the pike to bite, the 28-year-old prop may reflect on the volatility of a rugby career that had him hooked from the age of seven but which also sent him to the murky depths of despair. Where once he was a fish out of water, now he is a prize catch; a first pick for Scotland in 2020 and named in a notional Lions XV by no less than Sir Ian McGeechan.He is engaging company. Many of the questions directed his way are met with a chuckle and the line, ‘There’s a bit of a story behind that’. Only when asked about ‘his injury’ does he baulk. “I don’t like to talk about it because I feel I’m past that now,” he responds – before giving us chapter and verse on it anyway because he can’t help himself.The injury occurred in 2016 but the origins go back two years earlier, when Sutherland was still in Edinburgh’s academy.“It was quite soon into professional rugby that I started to get problems with my groin,” the loosehead explains. “That was clearly a load thing through training. It was just the sheer change. As a club player, you’re never doing weights and rugby in the same day, so you need to let your body adapt over time.Hold tight: being crunched by Sam Underhill and Tom Curry during this year’s Calcutta Cup match (Inpho)“That pre-season (2014) two of the (loosehead) props, Alasdair Dickinson and Wicus Blaauw, went down injured, so I knew I was going to get an opportunity. I played a few games and went well. And it was after those few games that I started to get trouble with my groin.”Instead of flagging up the issue, Sutherland kept schtum. He didn’t tell the coaches, the S&C guys or his team-mates. He didn’t even tell his girlfriend, Tammy. And he maintained that stance for month after tortuous month.“If I had said, ‘I’m getting a bit sore here’, I’d have been pulled out and missed a few sessions. But I didn’t, I just battled through it. If I knew what I know now I would never have changed a thing. Rugby’s a dog-eat-dog world; one day rooster, the next day feather duster. So when the sun shines, you’ve got to make hay.“I knew something was wrong but at the start it was manageable, it was something I’d get sometimes in the gym or in training or in a game. I didn’t want to say anything in case I was pulled out. I’d just broken onto the scene, I was still making impressions and I wanted those impressions to be good ones. I didn’t want them to think I was someone who didn’t want to train. So when I got my opportunities I had to take them.Masking the pain: scoring v London Welsh in December 2014, when the injury issues had begun (Getty)“When I got my first caps for Scotland (2016) it was at its worst. When I got selected, I had a million emotions going through my brain: excitement, fear, worry, anxiety. ‘Am I going to be able to play to the best of my ability or is my groin going to stop me?’“You’re almost trying to convince yourself that something isn’t wrong. I didn’t want to talk about it, not even with Tammy. I’d mention here and there that my groin was sore or that the inside of my leg hurts a bit today. But I wasn’t giving much away. And the same with my parents and my friends, everyone in my life. No one knew what I was going through because I tried to drag it out for as long as I could.”Inevitably, his precarious footing on the tightrope of fortune couldn’t last. In the autumn of 2016, Edinburgh were playing Harlequins and during the warm-up he went to sprint off the line. “I felt this huge bang between my legs, like a shotgun going off. I was absolutely devastated but there was a shimmer of relief as well. That was it, I had come to the end of the struggle. I had to get the scans and have the operation and get it right.”Sutherland’s injury, requiring a bilateral adductor reconstruction, was so severe that his career looked done. But he dug deeper than ever before, enduring the indignity of being bed-bound for a month and house-bound for another two. Initially, Tammy would start the day by dealing with the couple’s two boys, Mason and Hamish. Then she would help Rory get out of bed to go to the toilet and wash and get dressed.Scots on top: Scotland celebrate a try v France last winter. They finish the Six Nations this month (Getty)Sutherland’s gratitude to Tammy is clear as he discusses this trying time and he was as proud as punch when, in August, he finally married the love of his life after the wedding had been postponed four times because of the pandemic. They had a small ceremony at Tammy’s father’s house in Hawick.Did he doubt that he would ever return to the field?“I doubted every day. I would go through it a hundred times a day. I’d think about taking the field again and get a rush of excitement and happiness, and then two seconds later I’d be thinking about walking into the doctor’s clinic and they’re saying, ‘Sorry, you’re not going to play rugby again.’ Five minutes after that I’d be thinking about playing rugby again.“That was how every day went for me – massive, massive ups and downs. Happiness. Sadness. Depression. Anxiety. It was a really tough time in my life.”He was assisted hugely by former team-mate Ben Atiga, who he bumped into at Murrayfield shortly after his first check-up. Atiga runs the SRU’s mental health programme Rugby for Life, and made numerous visits to Sutherland’s home in the small Borders town of Lauder.Scotland buddie: with Adam Hastings (AFP/Getty)Atiga prompted Sutherland to start reading as a means of distraction and offered tips to help him sleep. He got him to set goals, including what he’d like to do should rugby no longer be an option. Sutherland is a qualified electrical mechanical engineer and quite fancies working on wind turbines or on the rigs off shore once he hangs up his boots. A version of this article appeared in the October 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img Pushing through the barrier: Rory Sutherland carries for Edinburgh against Glasgow in August (Inpho) Loosehead Rory Sutherland reveals the painful hidden toll behind a career that has taken him from Hawick to Edinburgh and Scotland honours – and a possible Lions tour last_img read more

Read More →

Senatla suspended after horrific flip that nearly ended terribly

first_imgThursday May 6, 2021 Senatla suspended after horrific flip that nearly ended terribly Stormers winger Seabelo Senatla has been suspended following a disciplinary hearing on Wednesday after he was red carded for a dangerous challenge on Sharks fullback Aphelele Fassi in the PRO14 Rainbow Cup this past weekend. ADVERTISEMENTTwo of South Africa’s fastest men collided in what was the first of two red cards on the day.The collision was unfortunate and certainly not malicious, as Senatla appeared to misjudge the length of the kick and instead of competing for the ball, he ran straight into Fassi’s legs, flipping him for a full rotation that thankfully didn’t end in injury.The Sevens star was shown a straight red card by referee Jaco Peyper and has since been suspended for four weeks after transgressing Law 9.17: “A player must not tackle, charge, pull, push or grasp an opponent whose feet are off the ground.”In the hearing conducted by Judicial Officer Adv Tokkie van Zyl (SC), Senatla admitted that the red card was justified, and the abbreviated process was followed.The transgression was treated as a mid-range offence and the player is suspended up to and including Friday, 4 June, which equates to four matches. ADVERTISEMENTSenatla’s team-mate Willie Engelbrecht (No 8) is free to play after also receiving a red card in the same match.Engelbrecht was red carded in the 47th minute after receiving his second yellow card (the first was in the 14th minute), both incidents for dangerous tackling.However, Judicial Officer Adv Rob Stelzner (SC) found that the second yellow card was unwarranted and has been expunged from Engelbrecht’s record, which means that the red card (consequent upon the second yellow card) is also to be erased from the player’s record. Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Big Hits & Dirty Play Related Articles 7 WEEKS AGO Another red card for striking leaves Andre… 7 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Pure head-loss from Rebels star leads… 7 WEEKS AGO Brutal breakdown stamping in 2003 shows just… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Read More →

Hoax charity e-mails

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Advertisement UK Fundraising founder Howard Lake’s letter to the editor is printed in today’s The Independent.Read the text of his letter highlighting the dangers of charity hoax e-mails. Hoax charity e-mails  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 19 April 2000 | News read more

Read More →

50 more Covid related deaths recorded and 3,498 additional cases

first_imgThe Department of Health has confirmed a further 50 covid related deaths this evening.3,498 additional cases have also be recorded, 128 in Donegal.The number of patients being treated in hospital for the virus is 1,850, 184 of which are in ICU.118 people have been hospitalised in the past 24 hours.The 14 day incidence rate of the virus in Donegal currently stands at 1598.1 cases per 100,000 of the population. Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook By News Highland – January 15, 2021 Twitter Twitter Google+ Previous article73 Covid related deaths recorded in Donegal up to January 8thNext articleMain Evening news, Sport, Nuacht and Obituaries Friday January 15th News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th center_img Pinterest 50 more Covid related deaths recorded and 3,498 additional cases Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Homepage BannerNews Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+ Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

Read More →

Border patrol detains man with stage 4 cancer after cruise docks in Florida, family says

first_imgCarnival Cruise Lines(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) — A Chinese man with stage 4 cancer and his wife were detained on Monday after the Carnival cruise they were on docked at a port in Florida, according to the couple’s family.Yuanjun Cui and Huan Wang came to the U.S. in December on a multiple entry travel visa valid for 10 years, their son-in-law, Joseph McDevitt, told ABC News.After Cui had his stomach removed and endured up to eight rounds of chemotherapy, McDevitt and his wife had invited her parents to come stay with them in the U.S. so the dying grandfather could get to know his grandchildren during his final months, McDevitt said.The family, who are from the Ozarks region of Missouri, had an “awesome” time on their cruise aboard the Carnival Elation, which departed Jacksonville, Florida, on Thursday and returned on Monday after traveling to the Bahamas, McDevitt said.But, in hindsight, McDevitt realized there were some red flags, he said. When they first got on the boat, there was an “issue” with the family’s paperwork, but they were finally allowed to board after about an hour, with the attendant ensuring them that “if there were any problems, they would fix them en route,” McDevitt said.Then, during the trip, McDevitt was called up to the front desks a total of four times to show cruise personnel their paperwork, he said, adding that Carnival employees “knew something” was wrong.“They should have never let us on the boat,” McDevitt said. “I would have rather lost my money on a cruise than my family.”Once the cruise docked in Jacksonville on Monday, the family was the first off the boat after they were deemed “persons of interest,” McDevitt said.They brought the family to the front, fingerprinted his wife’s parents, separated the family, and threatened to arrest them, he said. McDevitt’s children, ages 3 and 4, remained with his wife, while he and his wife’s parents were placed in separate rooms. McDevitt then requested to be released because he “was being detained for no reason,” and called an attorney once he got out.“Eventually, my wife was released, and my kids, and we never saw her parents again,” he said. Since then, the family has been holed up in a Florida hotel room for two days as they try to figure out what happened to his wife’s parents, McDevitt said. They have had no indication of what happened to them since they last saw them on Monday, he said.McDevitt, a U.S. citizen, is a business owner and active duty member of the Army National Guard, ABC affiliate station WJXX in Jacksonville reported. His wife gained citizenship through marriage.His wife’s parents did not have any money or keys to their home in China when they were detained, McDevitt told WJXX.The family’s immigration attorney, Susan Pai, described the couple’s detention as “illegal” in a letter sent to federal officials, according to WJXX. Pai said that the couple “did not voluntarily or knowingly withdraw their application for admission under their ten-year B1/B2 visas” and said they were forced to sign a paper with contents unknown to them because they only understand Chinese, WJXX reported.Pai hypothesized that the recent green card applications filed by Wang and Cui were invalidated when they left the country on the cruise, according to WJXX. But the valid travel visa should have guaranteed the couple’s return, she told the station. Officials told McDevitt that Carnival would pay for his in-laws’ plane ticket back to China, according to WJXX. Both Cui and Wang are in their 60s, WJXX reported.A spokesperson for Carnival Cruise Line did not immediately return ABC News’ request for comment.In a statement, a spokesman for U.S. Customs and Border Control said the agency “welcomes more than a million passengers arriving in the United States every day,” and that border patrol officers are “charged with enforcing not only immigration and customs laws” but also enforcing more than 400 laws from 40 other agencies.“Under U.S. immigration law [Section 291 of the INA [8 USC 1361] applicants for admission bear the burden of proof to establish that they are clearly eligible to enter the United States,” the statement read. “In order to demonstrate that they are admissible, the applicant must overcome ALL grounds of inadmissibility.”The statement did not comment specifically on the couple’s case.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More →

Staying the course

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Staying the courseOn 1 Feb 2000 in Personnel Today Abysmal completion rates for Modern Apprenticeships have sparked calls for a rethink in the implementation of work-based training. The most recent statistics from the DfEE revealed that just 32 per cent of people leaving the Modern Apprenticeship scheme achieved an NVQ Level 3 qualification or higher.The figures also show major discrepancies between sectors. The motor industry and engineering manufacturing performed better than average, with 44 per cent and 36 per cent completion rates respectively, but the hospitality and retailing sectors only achieved 15 per cent and 11 per cent. John Brennan, director of further education development at the Association of Colleges, says: “I’m disappointed that one of the major government programmes for young people has such a low success rate.” He adds that while the Government has been keen to challenge colleges on the success of further education programmes it has been less vocal about the much lower completion rates for modern apprenticeships. “The question is, what does the Government intend to do and is it committed to raising standards in this area of work-based programmes?” One of the main reasons for the low success rate appears to be the attitude of employers. A DfEE study last September on work-based training generally, Tackling Early Leaving from Youth Programmes, said some training providers had suggested “that a number of employers pressurise young people to leave training early or to take up permanent employment with or without training”. Another problem, according to the DfEE, was poor initial assessment by training providers of young people entering programmes such as Modern Apprenticeships. It found assessment can range from an interview to establish exam results to a much more rigorous assessment of basic and key skills. Proper initial assessment helps with retention, the study said. Adrian Anderson, director of policy at the NTO National Council, says: “It’s clear a lot needs to be done on Modern Apprenticeships and that’s something both we and the DfEE recognise.” NTOs have developed the training frameworks delivered through Tecs, says Anderson, but he argues that NTOs could play a wider role in evaluating and monitoring Modern Apprenticeships, which could help improve completion rates. “We have sent proposals to the secretary of state outlining a new role for national training organisations in evaluation, marketing and review of work-based training,” he says, adding that this would be an appropriate task for NTOs because they enjoy strong employer backing. Another area the Government is expected to examine is whether NVQ Level 3 is an appropriate completion point for all modern apprenticeships. The much lower success rates in sectors such as retailing suggest employers in those areas do not necessarily feel trainees need to achieve such a high standard. “In retail, there is no tradition of NVQ Level 3 and employers often see Level 2 as an acceptable standard,” says Brennan.Iain Murray, policy officer at the TUC, accepts this may be an issue and points to proposals by the NTO National Council for two modern apprenticeship tracks. “One would take young people to NVQ Level 2 and the other to Level 3.” Murray, while accepting there are a variety of reasons for the low success rate, stresses employers need to be aware of their responsibilities under the programme: “The modern apprenticeship debate is part of a much wider examination of work-based training and we’re not just blaming employers for problems. “But it’s clear employers need to be aware of their roles and responsibilities in ensuring young people receive the training they are supposed to.” It is clear the DfEE will have to do a lot of thinking, says John Brennan, on how work-based training will be delivered in the future, but he is sceptical about whether changes will occur in the short term. “At the moment the Government is funding a Level 3 programme but only getting a Level 2 output, so perhaps the funding regime needs to be rethought,” he says. “But I haven’t seen any indication that the Government is considering action.“ The abolition of Tecs, however, may provide an opportunity to reshape the system, he believes: “In the long term the abolition of Tecs and creation of learning and skills councils may provide a chance to look at this funding issue.”   Case study:  Matra Marconi Space Success or failure the employer’s choice, says space company Commitment by the employer is one of the key elements in a successful modern apprenticeship programme, according to Glyn Berrington, UK training and development manager at satellite manufacturer Matra Marconi Space. “We have a 100 per cent completion record for our modern apprentices and that is because we have high expectations from the word go and push our young people hard in employment and at college,” he says. The company has around 40 young people doing modern apprenticeships in mechanical and electrical engineering.The company takes seriously its relationship with colleges, says Berrington, and has a “preferred supplier” list of favoured training providers. It also ensures commitment from young people by insisting all candidates for the scheme attend a one-day selection process to assess personal skills and motivation. The key to the success of the programme is not relying on others, such as colleges, but for the employer to take a proactive role in monitoring Modern Apprenticeships, he says. “We rely on the colleges for the academic part, but it’s up to us to ensure the programme is working overall and to monitor people’s progress.” In practice, this means informing line managers of their responsibility and having a dedicated member of the training staff whose job is to manage in-work training programmes for young people. “We have seen Tecs come and go in the same way as the old Engineering Training Board but, when it comes to how successful schemes like modern apprenticeships are, the buck stops with the employer,” says Berrington. By Patrick McCurry Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Read More →

When distance is no object

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Erstwhile television star and media mogul Noel Edmonds didn’t like the videoconferencing on offer so he created his own. Simon Kent assesses its applications and puts them to the ultimate test – a video conference with the man himself Seven years ago, Noel Edmonds set up offices for his Unique group of companies in Jacobstowe, Devon. With operations already established in Kensington, he found much of his time was taken up commuting between locations in order to hold business meetings. So two years ago, he began exploring the possibility of linking the two sites by video. He was not impressed by what he found. “I was astonished at how bad the systems were,” he admits. “In addition, I was angry to find that the people who were trying to sell it to me seemed very satisfied with the technology and wanted to charge me a huge sum of money.”Picture and sound quality meant productive meetings were virtually impossible and at £35,000 for the equipment at each end, Edmonds could not justify such an investment. “I didn’t have a £70,000 problem,” he says. Instead, he set some of his own staff the task of creating a suitable system. The result was the sourcing of a cost-efficient and high quality package. Having had this experience, Edmonds decided there was a gap in the marketplace for impartial and independent advice in delivering video conferencing solutions, and so he created The Video Meeting Company (VMC).”What I find fascinating is that the total obsession with the Internet – from Tony Blair to the bedroom computer geeks – has created a real smoke screen in this area,” says Edmonds. “People don’t realise the technology is here today and it is affordable.”Talk directlySo how does it feel to use this technology? I interviewed Edmonds via the Kensington/Jacobstowe link, and after the initial novelty of being able to talk directly to someone on television, the level of interaction was comparable to a face-to-face meeting. It was possible to relax into the conversation, pick up on body language and we were soon talking over each other as if we had we not been 250 miles apart. The dynamic changed slightly when a third party joined the meeting at the Kensington end – the presence of another real person in the room made it feel more natural to ignore the television set in the corner – but the quality of interaction was not impaired. A remote control handset means participants at both ends of the link can control the viewed image so Edmonds could see the entire meeting room at Kensington and the second person entering without having to stop and refocus the camera.While the camera can be controlled to focus on specific objects in the room – perhaps a flipchart or demonstration equipment – the Polyspan equipment used in-house by VMC will also permit other information to be shared between locations. It’s possible to plug in white boards or send graphics files, so the same information can be viewed by all participants. For JCB, one of VMC’s clients, the company linked a hand-held digital camera to the system which enabled office-based technicians to view and assess equipment in the field.The system links up a maximum of four different sites, enabling every viewer to see and talk to each other. Further locations can be added – in theory as many as the human eye can take – but doing so requires the use of video bridging, a kind of telephone exchange which enables all sites to interact. Such bridges must be booked in advance, thereby removing the instant access possible over a smaller number of sites and introducing an additional cost to running the technology. However, since VMC estimates a standard six persons out of the office meeting costs businesses over £1,500 in salaries and travel – in a training scenario, further residential costs can be added – the technology still seems a cost-effective alternative. Few examplesDoes this technology truly have a place alongside the ever-increasing battery of training resources – videos, DVDs, on-line learning?In general there are few examples of training activities occurring over videoconferencing and its full potential has yet to be explored. The Royal Bank of Scotland has 30 videoconferencing units (nothing to do with VMC) linked across its internal phone system offering both training and communication content. The system also delivers video images to branch PCs. “Our users have told us they don’t want any frills with this technology,” says George Clark, head of voice and video services at the bank. “They just want to be able to talk to someone face-to-face.” In Clark’s experience, the basic performance of the major manufacturers of videoconferencing equipment is pretty much on a par, with additional developments and special features being of progressively less use to customers. Since they have implemented a system specific to their requirements, they have little need to keep up with technological changes.Meanwhile, technology experts are waiting for videoconferencing to take off.”Videoconferencing is of those technologies which is lurking at the moment,” says Vaughan Waller, chairman of the eLearning Network. “There’s no doubt that when the technology becomes easier to understand it will be embraced more.” Face-to-face interactionWaller notes videoconferencing’s biggest selling point is the face-to-face interaction offered by the technology. “Technology-based training tends to lead to learning in isolation, and at least video-conferencing offers that vital ingredient of sharing experience with fellow human beings,” he says.VMC has yet to implement a system that is directly used for training, but according to Edmonds they are beginning to explore this area for a couple of their clients including Granada, which has difficulties reaching staff across its network of restaurants. “Undoubtedly, the whole issue of HR and training people, getting a consistent message across a number of people at once is very exciting,” says Edmonds. “But this does not replace all meetings. It is complementary to the other ways in which you communicate.”Vaughan Waller adds, “Videoconferencing should be used as a tool like any other. I can see it creating a big culture shock for many people. We have seen how e-mail has had a negative effect in the area of personal relationships because many people are relying on that medium for communicating for unpleasant or bad news.” Videoconferencing may address this problem, although it may also trigger yet more training activities to ensure users do not allow facial reactions to compromise the message they are communicating.How much does it cost?VMC’s service covers three areas:Communications Audit Internal communications are assessed and recommendations made for equipment requiredChange Management Tailored programmes are designed and delivered to integrate technology use into the organisationTraining Courses cover technology use and presentation skills.Cameras cost around £6,000 each and can be used with any standard television set made in the last 20 years. Operating costs are around £9 an hour. Leasing arrangements are possible and start at around £250 per month per location. When distance is no objectOn 1 Oct 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

Read More →

Trump in NYC reportedly to check on family business

first_imgDonald Trump (Getty/Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)Donald Trump is in New York City this week to check in on his family’s real estate business, according to a new report.The former president has shown interest in working more with the Trump Organization, which is a major reason for his New York City trip, according to the New York Daily News, citing a source who spoke on the condition of anonymity.Read moreFifth Avenue will look different after Trump leaves officeTrump Organization sues Marc Fisher for $1.5M in rentGucci renews its Trump Tower lease Trump kept his ownership position in his real estate firm throughout his time in office, but passed off day-to-day responsibilities to his sons, Eric and Don Jr.ADVERTISEMENTTrump is expected to stay in Trump Tower during his visit. He is not expected to meet with any prosecutors while in New York, where he faces an investigation into his businesses by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance and Attorney General Letitia James.Vance, who is investigating whether Trump inflated the value of real estate assets, is seeking to meet in person with Michael Cohen, the president’s former personal lawyer, according to the Daily News, citing a source familiar with the probe.Vance is also seeking to get more information out of Allen Weisselberg, the Trump Organization’s chief financial officer for decades. Vance is said to be seeking to ask questions about Weisselberg’s adult sons.[NY Daily News]  — Keith Larsen Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Tags Cy VanceTrumptrump organizationlast_img read more

Read More →

Walker Pitches Strong in 4-2 BYU Win

first_imgThe Cougars will look to complete the sweep against the Waves on Saturday, April 13, at 1 p.m. MDT. The game can be viewed live on BYUtv while audio broadcasts will be available on BYU Radio and ESPN 960. Pepperdine (16-14, 7-7 WCC) took a 2-0 lead over BYU (24-8, 10-4 WCC) off a pair of sacrifice flies in the top of the third inning. Walker, who came into the game leading the nation with a 0.49 ERA, went a career-long 7.1 innings pitched while also throwing five strikeouts to tie his career best. Player Highlights Brian Hsu: 2-4, RAustin Deming: 1-3, 2B, 2 RBIEaston Walker: W (4-0), 7.1 IP, 0 ER, 0 BB, 3 K Game Summary With two outs in the bottom of the third frame, Brock Hale brought Brian Hsu home from second base with a single up the middle to score the Cougars’ first run. With bases loaded, Austin Deming scored Noah Hill and Hale and advanced Jackson Cluff to third off a single to left field. Deming and Cluff then executed a successful double steal with Cluff coming home for the fourth run of the inning to take a 4-2 lead. Written by After two outs and down 2-0, the Cougars scored four runs in the third inningJackson Cluff stole home off of a successful double steal with Austin Deming stealing secondEaston Walker pitched a career-high 7.1 innings and tied his career best in strikeouts with five in the win “They put the pressure on us all night long,” BYU head coach Mike Littlewood said. “But we also did the same thing to them. Easton was great; he settled in and did a really nice job of giving us seven innings.” Drew Zimmerman relieved Walker in the top of the eighth to close out the game for BYU. With the tying run on second base in the top of the ninth, Zimmerman struck out back-to-back batters to earn the save, his fourth of the season. Robert Lovell FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah – Sophomore Easton Walker had a solid night on the mound as BYU baseball beat Pepperdine 4-2 on Friday at Miller Field. Tags: BYU Cougars Baseball/Easton Walker/WCC April 12, 2019 /Sports News – Local Walker Pitches Strong in 4-2 BYU Winlast_img read more

Read More →