HOT OFF THE PRESS! DONEGAL STUDENT ROCKS AS HE WINS MAJOR WRITING AWARD

first_imgSomhairle O’Braoinain with judges including writer Roddy Doyle and editor of Hot Press Niall Stokes.A Co Donegal student has won a major writing competition – and that’s news hot off the press!Somhairle O’Braoinain, a fifth year student at Colasite Ailigh in Letterkenny, was named Overall Winner of the National Creative Writing Competition “Write Here Write Now” run by Hot Press.The awards ceremony took place yesterday in the Mansion House Dublin. Somhairle won the overall prize for the Secondary School National category.He is a student of Mrs Maria Rushe at Coláiste Ailigh and has shown extraordinary talent in his personal writing since first year.He is also a keen actor and musician and we are very proud that his talent is being recognised on a national level.Somhairle is from Ramelton, son of local storyteller and writer Joe Brennan. His prizes include an internship during 2015 with Hot Press, the country’s leading music and lifestyle magazine, as well as a €250 cash prize, a Toshiba Click Mini and a Microsoft Sculpt Comfort Mouse.He will also receive an e-Reader, courtesy of Eason and will have his winning entry published in a special issue of Hot Press.HOT OFF THE PRESS! DONEGAL STUDENT ROCKS AS HE WINS MAJOR WRITING AWARD was last modified: May 1st, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Colasite AilighdonegalHot PressletterkennyRameltonwriting awardlast_img read more

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Young, gifted, black – and free

first_imgJustice MalalaI am not one to go ga-ga over birthdays. I am disconcerted, but not surprised, by the fervour with which many of my countrymen – and peoples elsewhere in the world – have embraced celebrations of Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday.I guess this is the point at which I should write that although I am cynical about birthdays I, too, am feeling a bit sentimental about this one. Well, actually not. The Mandela birthday celebrations have not really touched me much except for the fact that just the other day I heard that a former colleague had left her job. And that got me thinking about Mandela.“Mandela is 90 years old and I am going to see the world,” she said. And she was gone, just like that, to travel through the African continent.And I thought: Freedom. It never ceases to amaze me just how heady the freedom that South Africa has today changes lives. Every so often it hits me as young black kids take gap years to build dams in South America, or do something daring in Europe, how free and full of opportunity we have become.About four months ago a friend forwarded me an email that had been written by a colleague of his. The colleague was a young man in his early 30s who had decided to chuck in the job, buy a 4×4 and travel through Africa from Cairo to the Cape with a friend. And a credit card.Their journey was hilarious, harrowing, fun and adventurous. Every week or so the young man would find an internet connection, send mass emails and pictures, and take up the story of what they had been through. There were stories of lateness, of generosity, of promptness, of hunger and poverty. Africa was alive, ugly and beautiful and frustrating and fulfilling.If you are European this is not particularly new or even that daring. But this young man is a black South African. And that is telling. Eighteen years ago black South Africans were still living under the strictures of apartheid. Their lives and those of progressive whites were intolerable.Freedom. Eighteen years later, a minuscule time in the mammoth task of building a nation, these same “victims” of apartheid are not living under the depression of apartheid. They are free to express themselves as they wish, without fear of censure.My friend who has decided to travel through the continent is young and talented. She finished school, worked and rose up fast. She decided to go off and backpack through the continent.When Mandela became president in 1994 he spoke about how his new government was about extending the frontiers of human endeavour. Citing the poet Ingrid Jonker, he said: “The government I have the honour to lead and I dare say the masses who elected us to serve in this role, are inspired by the single vision of creating a people-centred society.Accordingly, the purpose that will drive this government shall be the expansion of the frontiers of human fulfilment, the continuous extension of the frontiers of that freedom.”Like many across the world, South Africa is today burdened by the international economic slowdown. Food prices are sky high and transport costs are being driven up inexorably by the rampant oil price. Plus we have our own massive challenges: HIV/Aids, crime and others.The “expansion of the frontiers of human fulfilment” that Mandela spoke about, in these tough times, is something very easily overlooked. But incredibly, it is here. I saw it just the other day when thousands of people queued across the country to buy shares of the energy parastatal Sasol in a public offering to encourage black participation in the economy.In those queues were young men and women, mothers and fathers and grandparents, all of them buying a stake in South Africa’s economy. The “frontiers of human fulfillment”, in a small way, were being expanded in those queues. Certainly, the camaraderie in those queues indicated to me at least that dignity had been restored to people.On a flight from Mauritius recently, I was incredible to see the number of black people – many of them young backpackers – on the flight. A group of them were chatting excitedly about their exploits. This is a scene that would have been a curiosity 10years ago. I am finding that it is a normal occurrence, just another fruit of our democracy and freedom, these days.I see nowadays, constantly, freedom expressed in so many ways by young South Africans who seem to have shed the hang-ups, the sheer weight, that those of us older folk seem to carry. They live, fully and untethered, a free life.It is in them, perhaps, that the spirit of Nelson Mandela is best expressed. He is not just a symbol of freedom. These young people, they are that freedom.Justice Malala is an award-winning former newspaper editor, and is now general manager of Avusa’s stable of 56 magazines. He writes weekly columns for The Times newspaper and Financial Mail magazine, as well as a monthly media and politics column for Empire magazine. He is the resident political analyst for independent television channel e.tv and has consulted extensively for financial institutions on South African political risk. Malala was also an executive producer on Hard Copy I and II, a ground-breaking television series on SABC 3. Hard Copy I won the Golden Horn Award for best television series. Malala’s work has been published internationally in the Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Financial Times, The Independent, Forbes, Institutional Investor, The Age and The Observer.last_img read more

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Back to Basics: The Rule of Thirds in Filmmaking

first_imgImage via Marvel Studios.In a typical shot, your subject should be somewhere within the grid divides, as you can see above. The subject can be both the character and the object, since they often work together. Each is at opposite sides of the frame, which draws equal attention to both subjects. Objects need room around them to enable the viewer to see them more clearly. If the character is in the middle of the frame, all attention who go to them, and the object would no longer be a critical piece of the frame. Using the Rule of Thirds can dramatically increase the look of your composition. Here’s a few tips on how to integrate this technique into your next shot.Cover image via Universal Pictures and Learn Online Video.When you’re first learning about cameras and shot composition, one of the basic concepts you encounter is the rule of thirds. If you haven’t heard of the rule yet, I like Grace Fussell‘s definition:Imagine a 3×3 grid on top of any image. You should align the key elements in the image according to this grid — at the ‘power points’ where the lines intersect, or along and within the vertical and horizontal lines. You can also combine these two arrangements for complex images with layers of subjects.Image via Shutterstock.As Fussell explains in this Shutterstock article, the lines on the 3×3 grid are the places where our eyes automatically look for information. When you put the main focus of your image along this grid, the result is more aesthetically pleasing to your viewer.If you are looking for the fundamentals of the rule of thirds in still images, check out Grace’s article. Here, I’ll focus on how to apply the rule of thirds to moving images.Placement Image via New Line Cinema.Another rule of thirds tactic is the concept of leading. This is when you place your subject on the opposite side of the frame from the object of his or her attention. This technique is psychological in nature because when your eyes look at incomplete information (such as an actor looking offscreen), they want to fill it to make it complete. In the image above, the subject is presenting something to a subject offscreen. Even though there is nothing in the left side of the shot, our minds automatically deduce that there is someone on the other side of that frame. If the subject had no lead room, the shot would just feel off.Eye Lines Image via Kvibe Productions.Using the rule of thirds is a great way to establish eye lines. Check out the shot above. Feels natural, right? Just like the leading concept, since your eyes are automatically searching for information along those lines, you can find his eyes easily and instinctively read his emotions. Humans can gather a lot of information by reading someone’s eyes, so when you place them in a easy-to-find spot in your composition, the viewer connects more naturally with what you are trying to portray.Rack Focus Image via Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Columbia Pictures.When you’re trying to pull off a rack focus shot, object placement is critical. Using the rule of thirds is a neat way to find where you should place those objects. In the shot above, both the glass and the actor carry a lot of visual weight when it comes to the information of this shot. The focus from the foreground to the background conveys that the glass has some sort of influence over the actor.You may say that the two subjects are too close together, but the closeness transmits a sense of urgency and immediacy to the viewer. Their distance is the perfect balance. Any farther would have separated the two, and any closer would block the actor’s face with the glass, ruining the ever-important emotions we’re watching in the actor.All in all, the rule of thirds may be a basic concept, but the impact it has on your shot composition is astronomical. Next time you are shooting something, turn on the grid feature on your camera and adjust from there. Trust me, you will come out with some awesome cinematic shots.Want more cinematography resources? Check out these links:Gear Tip: How to Clean your Lenses Like a ProfessionalTips for Photographers Transitioning to VideographyFind Cinematic Inspiration with These Visionary PhotographersCreate Better Establishing Shots With These Photography Techniqueslast_img read more

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Marinero pounds Wangs-Letran for 1st back-to-back wins

first_imgPBA IMAGESMarinerong Pilipino coasted to its first back-to-back wins in the 2018 PBA D-League Aspirants’ Cup, humbling Wangs Basketball-Letran, 96-84, Thursday at Pasig Sports Center.Behind Renzo Subido and Abu Tratter, the Skippers finished the first half  on a 7-0 spurt and sustained that run in the third period with Billy Robles leading the charge to push the lead to as big as 23 numerous times.ADVERTISEMENT Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Troy Rosario avoids serious injury after scary fall John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding AFP official booed out of forum Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City View comments Read Next LATEST STORIES 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Rian Ayonayon topscored for Marinerong Pilipino with 14 points, six assists, and four rebounds, Subido went 4-of-6 from threes for his 12 markers, and Robles got 12 points and five rebounds to spearhead the balanced attack.Kyle Toth also shot 4-of-6 from downtown to nab 12 markers, while Gab Banal recorded a double-double with 10 points and 15 rebounds.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Everybody knows the gameplan, believed in it, and understood it. We’re just happy that everybody came in with laser-focus and executed our gameplan well,” said coach Koy Banal as his side improved to 3-2.The Skippers did a good job in setting the tempo for the game, taking 22 fastbreak points against Wangs-Letran’s 10 and dishing out 23 assists to their foes’ 14. Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MOST READ Bong Quinto carried the Couriers with 22 points as they fell to their second consecutive defeat.Rey Publico and Alex Mandreza got 11 in the loss.The Scores:MARINERONG PILIPINO 96 — Ayonayon 14, Robles 12, Subido 12, Toth 12, Banal 10, Tratter 9, Pasaol 8, Lopez 7, Paredes 5, Brill 2, Iñigo 2, Tolentino 2, Babilonia 1, Terso 0.WANGS BASKETBALL-LETRAN 84 — Quinto 22, Mandreza 11, Publico 11, Calvo 9, Balagasay 6, Muyang 6, Taladua 6, Fajarito 5, Batiller 4, Ambohot 2, Trinidad 2, Balanza 0, Vacaro 0, Yu 0.ADVERTISEMENT NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Quarters: 21-23, 47-40, 75-54, 96-84.last_img read more

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India register historic Test win at Lord’s

first_imgIndia bowler Ishant Sharma, left, celebrates taking the wicket of England’s Joe Root caught out by Stuart Binny on the fifth day of the second cricket test match between England and India at Lord’s cricket ground in London, Monday, July 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)India on Monday registered a historic 95-run win over England on the fifth and final day of the second cricket Test at Lord’s. ScorecardThis is India’s second Test win at Lord’s after a period of 28 years. At the same venue, India registered their lone win back in 1986.Resuming the second session at 173/5, England were bowled out for 223 while chasing a target of 319 runs.Pacer Ishant Sharma was the pick of the Indian bowlers with career best figures of 7/74. He was adjudged the Man of the Match.Ishant Sharma has the honour of leading India off after his match-winning 7/74 #EngvInd https://t.co/J4eQMLZApVLord’s Ground (@HomeOfCricket) July 21, 2014With the win, the visitors have taken a 1-0 lead in the five-match series.This is India’s second win at the ‘home of cricket’ since a Kapil Dev-led team won here back in 1986.Brief scores: India 295 and 342 beat England 319 and 223 (Joe Root 66, Moeen Ali 39; Ishant Sharma 7/74).England’s Moeen Ali walks off the field of play after losing his wicket off the bowling of India’s Ishant Sharma on the fifth day of the second cricket test match between England and India at Lord’s cricket ground in London, Monday, July 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)India’s Ishant Sharma, center, celebrates with his captain and wicketkeeper Mahendra Singh Dhoni, second right, after taking the wicket of England’s Moeen Ali, second left, on the fifth day of the second cricket test match between England and India at Lord’s cricket ground in London, Monday, July 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)advertisementIndia’s Cheteshwar Pujara, center, celebrates catching out England’s Moeen Ali off an Ishant Sharma, left, delivery on the fifth day of the second cricket test match between England and India at Lord’s cricket ground in London, Monday, July 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)England’s Joe Root hits a shot watched by India’s captain and wicketkeeper Mahendra Singh Dhoni on the fifth day of the second cricket test match between England and India at Lord’s cricket ground in London, Monday, July 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)India’s Shikhar Dhawan, left, regains his balance after stopping the ball at slip beside his captain and wicketkeeper Mahendra Singh Dhoni on the fifth day of the second cricket test match between England and India at Lord’s cricket ground in London, Monday, July 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)England’s Stuart Broad tries to avoid a bouncer form India’s Ishant Sharma on the fifth day of the second cricket test match between England and India at Lord’s cricket ground in London, Monday, July 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)last_img read more

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