Keck students struggle to connect

first_imgWhen second-year medical student Ali Tafreshi sits with his fellow senators at the Graduate Student Government meeting each month, one thing sets him apart from almost everyone else in the room: He’s wearing a white lab coat over his button-down and slacks.Tafreshi, who also serves as the student body president of the Keck School of Medicine of USC, is one of five GSG senators from Keck. Together, they are responsible for representing 1,200 medical, master’s in public health and Ph.D. students who call Keck home — a task that Tafreshi says is difficult because of the disconnect between the Health Sciences Campus and GSG. Burdened with classes and work, physically separated from the University Park Campus and often overlooked for programs and social events, many Keck students feel isolated from the governing body that represents them, an issue that Tafreshi says prevents them from taking full advantage of everything it has to offer. He and other Keck students involved in GSG agree that while the organization is making an effort to reach out to members of the HSC community, there is still work to be done before students on both campuses feel like they are represented equally. “[GSG] seems like something that was not meant for us,” Tafreshi said. “There’s all of these law students, business students, Ph.D. students that are involved with it and it’s right next to them, and it seems like [Keck students] are an afterthought to that.”Tafreshi said that when he first came to USC as a medical student, he knew that GSG must be important — but he never learned anything about it formally and never heard anyone talking about it around campus. After conducting research online, however, he realized the full scope of what GSG could do — and wanted to help other students realize this as well. “There is a disconnect between funding we receive from GSG and involvement in GSG,” Tafreshi said. “Most people’s involvement with GSG seems to be applying for funding … and nothing beyond that. They seem to understand how to ask for money, but it’s like a black hole — you don’t know what GSG is, you don’t know how anything is run, you don’t know how the finance committee runs, but you may or may not get your money and then you don’t ask questions after that.” Tafreshi explained that part of this lack of understanding came from the amount of work that Keck students had, including classes, internships and clinical hours that prevent many from reaching out to organizations like GSG that aren’t immediately accessible from their campus. Sydney O’Connor, a third-year Ph.D. candidate in health behavior research who also serves on the GSG Executive Board as the HSC director of operations, said that Keck students were too far from the UPC-based GSG. “Students throughout the year have voiced that they feel that being at the Health Sciences Campus can be isolating,” O’Connor said. “A lot of the time, major events and social programming are held at the University Park Campus, like tailgates and Springfest. It can feel very far away from us.” O’Connor explained that she and other GSG representatives from Keck are trying to bridge that gap, and she believes they have succeeded in improving HSC’s connection to GSG over the past few semesters. New programming like HSC tailgates, increased student representation through the HSC Concerns Committee and greater efforts to connect HSC students to UPC resources have helped many Keck students feel like GSG is an active presence on campus, O’Connor said. Colleen Garvey, a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in Keck’s cancer biology and genomics program and a first-year GSG senator, added that both campuses have worked together to make students more aware of what their student government can do for them.“People have been more vocal and taken the initiative to try to make it more inclusive,” Garvey said. “The communication has been huge — letting people know about the resources they have and the events that are going on.”However, O’Connor said that GSG can do more to bring resources to HSC — but it needs the help of UPC students and the recognition that Keck may require more attention because of its distance. Bringing UPC resources such as therapy dogs and safety personnel to HSC, O’Connor said, would go a long way toward helping students there gain a greater appreciation for what GSG can offer. “One of our goals is to bring all the resources and excitement that are available at UPC to HSC students,” O’Connor said. “We also want to encourage HSC students to actually travel to events taking place at UPC or at other locations around L.A. to meet students that they wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity to meet. We’re in a position as HSC GSG members where we are more aware of the resources that are available and who we can reach out to for specific requests, and we’re able to connect students to those individuals.”last_img read more

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Proper eating information session to be held at Northern Lights College tonight

first_imgRegistered dietitian Melanie Chapple will lead the event. She’ll be discussing the top ten foods you should be eating for maintaining a healthy heart, blood glucose control, and keeping your immune system high.The event is free and those attending will also have the chance to sign up for a Safeway shopping tour.Anyone wanting more information on tonight’s event is encouraged to contact the Safeway Pharmacy at 250-261-5479.- Advertisement –last_img

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Grab for bags could cause airfares to triple

first_imgAirfares would have to triple if aviation regulators were to re-certify aircraft to the reality of recent chaotic passenger evacuations.The evacuation of the burning American Airlines Boeing 767 at Chicago airport on Friday is a carbon copy of the accidents over the past few years with most passengers carrying their baggage with them.World’s scariest landingMH370: New evidence confirms spiral divePassengers are risking their lives, and those of fellow passengers, with the obsession of taking cabin baggage with them in an emergency.Aircraft are certified on the basis of all passengers off in 90 seconds with half the exits out of use. The stark reality is it takes three times longer – and sometimes more – with passengers slowing the process by grabbing bags.In the evacuation certification tests, the “passengers” are aircraft manufacturer employees who know the drill and they have no baggage.If regulators were to re-certify the long-range Boeing 777 to the reality of what actually happens, the 550 exit limit aircraft would have to be recertified to just 183 passengers – half its typical load. But for smaller aircraft such as the widely used A320 – and Boeing 737 – which has an exit limit of 195 and a typical configuration of 180 mostly economy passengers the impact would be devastating with a new limit of just 65.That would mean a tripling of airfares to make the aircraft economically viable.The impact on the industry and the world economy would be devastating but something needs to be done before hundreds die in an aircraft evacuation. And authorities are already stirring. Last year after a British Airways incident at Las Vegas the highly respected British Civil Aviation Authority issued a blunt warning to its airlines: Stop passengers taking their hand luggage off with them in an emergency evacuation!This is how passengers evacuated in the Airbus A380 certification test. The airline industry needs to take decisive action, perhaps by locking overhead lockers for takeoff and landing, to prevent passengers taking their baggage with them after a plane crash.Or an extreme measure would be to ban carry-on baggage other than a small bag such as a back pack.It is sobering to consider that it quite often takes 40 minutes to board a plane because of passenger/ baggage congestion.Not only does taking your baggage dramatically slow the process, there’s a distinct possibility that the bags with protruding metal parts will snag and then deflate the escape slides — rendering them useless.And in the scramble to get overstuffed bags out of lockers, passengers may be knocked out and the aisle blocked for precious seconds.There is also the very real prospect of passengers jumping on to the escape slide with their bag and knocking themselves or another passenger out, or even killing them.Duty-free alcohol is even more lethal because if the bottle breaks there is flammable liquid everywhere, not to mention broken glass.In a related development, passengers in these disasters are turning them into social media events by taking video and pictures and then trying to be the first to upload the images to Facebook or Twitter.Complicating matters airlines are not enforcing carry-on baggage limits for competitive reasons, says Steven Reed, National Industrial Officer with the Flight Attendants Association of Australia.“There is a very real potential for a catastrophe,” Mr Reed told AirlineRatings.com.The combination of passengers not listening, larger and heavier bags and more aggression and defiance from air travellers is a perfect storm, suggests Mr Reed.Tragically, it will take a disastrous evacuation with multiple deaths for the industry to act.last_img read more

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The Free State, South Africa’s heartland

first_imgLying in the heart of South Africa, the Free State’s rolling farmlands make it the breadbasket of South Africa. It is a province with a rich history, diverse cultures, and fascinating geological structures.A statue of South African statesman Nelson Mandela looks out over Bloemfontein, the capital of the Free State, from Naval Hill in the centre of the city. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Compiled by Mary AlexanderIt’s September. It’s spring in South Africa – and Tourism Month, celebrated this year with the theme “Tourism for All”. To inspire your next road trip we bring you nine galleries, one for each province, showcasing our country’s remarkable beauty and diversity.A thriving tourism industry means South Africa is closer to achieving its National Development Plan goals of skills development and creating decent employment through inclusive economic growth.The Free State’s attractions include the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, the provincial capital of Bloemfontein, hiking in the Maluti Mountains, and watersports on the Vaal and Orange rivers.The iconic Brandwag – “sentinel” – rock in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park in the Eastern Free State. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A typical Free State landscape: Farmlands on the plains giving way to the mountains beyond. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Public art outside the city hall in Bloemfontein. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Die Mystic Boer nightclub and restaurant in Bloemfontein. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Cosmos flowers bloom on the side of the road. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)An old farmhouse in the Eastern Free State. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Hiking the Cave Trail in the Maluti Mountains. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A diorama in the National Museum in Bloemfontein. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)San Bushman art in a rock shelter in the Eastern Free State, near the town of Ficksburg. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Maluti Mountains. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Gariep Dam on the Orange River. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Sunset over farms and mountains in the Eastern Free State. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Sterkfontein Dam. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Sunflowers in bloom. (Image: Brand South Africa)Traditional Basotho musicians perform in a cultural village. (Image: Brand South Africa)last_img read more

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Geocaching: The Best Work Out for Your Hippocampus or is it?

first_imgHaven’t you always dreamed of a bulging hippocampus? Another question at this point, might be: what’s a hippocampus?The hippocampus is the portion of the brain believed to store maps of our surroundings.  It allows us to navigate around this crazy mixed-up world.  It’s your inner GPS.  If you’re going to the grocery store, your parents’ house or the place by that Thai restaurant your friend told you about? Yeah, your hippocampus gets you there.A famous study into the inner wiring of London taxi drivers’ brains discovered something, well, unexpected.  The late 1990’s  research found the drivers hippocampi were much larger than normal, non-taxi-driver, hippocampi.Taxi drivers navigating with their hippocampus.The more the taxi drivers navigated the complex web of London streets, blind alleys and winding lanes, the larger their hippocampi grew.The oyster-sized and colored portion of our mind also plays a role in long-term memory.  And I believe geocaching flexes your hippocampus.Now there’s no study for what’s next (yet), but geocaching must be an amazing work out for your hippocampus.  You’re continuously navigating and building maps of your surroundings.  You’re challenging your ability to move from A to B. Finding a geocache pumps up your awareness of your location.  The concept sounds fairly simple.But some fear we rely on our GPS devices and mapping sites far too much.Last year a Los Angeles woman, Lauren Rosenberg, was struck by a car while crossing a highway in Utah.  In May, she filed a lawsuit against Google. According to The Washington Post, Rosenberg’s lawyer claims Google Maps provided walking directions that sent Rosenberg into harm’s way.  She ended up on a busy road with no sidewalks. She followed the directions sent to her Blackberry – which Rosenberg claims did not come with a warning about missing sidewalks.She got hit by a car. She accumulated massive medical bills.  She sued.  There was clearly a loss of “situational awareness.”So, which is it? Do we rely on maps and GPS devices too much? Or does the act of geocaching and navigating help grow the awareness of our surroundings?VOTE in the Geocaching.com Poll in the sidebar to your right.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedInterviews With Geocaching Filmmakers – Part 1February 16, 2015In “Events”37 Ways to Spice Up Your GeocachingJuly 22, 2014In “Community”This is My Hobby – Rock Climbing and GeocachingJune 7, 2012In “Community”last_img read more

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Somehow Céline Dions Son Is a ChartTopping SoundCloud Rapper

first_img Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Somehow Céline Dion’s Son Is a Chart-Topping SoundCloud RapperRené-Charles Angélil is Céline Dion’s son, but also Big Tip on SoundCloud, so we reviewed all five of his songsIt’s come to our attention that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree for Céline Dion’s son, René-Charles Angélil. He’s into music too, but instead of belting ballads like his mom—he’s a SoundCloud rapper by the name of Big Tip. With only five songs uploaded to his profile, the 17-year-old is sitting in the top five of both the US and Canada on SoundCloud’s R&B and Soul charts. But, is he any good? READ MORERené-Charles Angélil, Céline Dion’s son, tops SoundCloud chart as rapper Big TipIt was revealed on Tuesday that Céline Dion’s eldest child, René-Charles Angélil, has taken on a new persona and (sort of) followed in his mother’s footsteps. Advertisement Angélil, 17, is now a rapper known as Big Tip, and he’s posted numerous songs to a SoundCloud account. Some of his songs are covers of Toronto artist The Weeknd, including Catwalks (instead of The Weeknd’s Sidewalks) and Loft Music Remix. READ MORECéline Dion’s rapping son René-Charles Angélil kept Big Tip a big secretThe 17-year-old didn’t tell Dion about his songs until they hit the top of SoundCloud’s Canadian R&B charts this week.René-Charles Angélil is not your average 17-year-old — his mother happens to be one of the world’s most famous pop stars. But he shares at least one trait with millions of other teenage kids: he wanted to do something without telling his mom about it ahead of time.So he went and recorded two rap songs in his home studio, in the garage beside the family home in Las Vegas. He released them Monday on the streaming platform SoundCloud under his stage name, Big Tip, and he only got around to telling his mother about all this after the songs went to No. 1 and No. 2 on the Canadian SoundCloud R&B charts. His mother being Céline Dion. READ MORECeline Dion’s Kid Has Released More Rap MusicAfter making his musical debut with a couple of cheeseball Weeknd covers, Réne-Charles Angélil has returned with more music under his Big Tip moniker.Over the last couple days, the 17-year-old son of Céline Dion and the late René Angélil has unveiled three new tracks on SoundCloud.“Never Stop,” “The Apple” and “The Kid” hear him once again rapping about his lavish lifestyle and making bold lyrical assertions — like rhyming “desert” with “dessert,” and claiming “They say I’m an asshole, cause I only spit hot shit.” READ MORE Celine Dion’s son, Big Tip, charting with rap debutCeline Dion’s son’s secretive foray into rap music has already sent him to the top of the charts on Soundcloud.Rene-Charles Angelil, the 17-year-old son of the music superstar and her late husband Rene Angelil, uploaded two covers of The Weeknd songs to his Soundcloud account on Monday under the name Big Tip. Those clips quickly shot up to the No. 1 and No. 2 spots on the Canadian SoundCloud R&B charts.Angelil has since dropped three more other tracks: Never Stop, The Apple and The Kid. Each features original lyrics about life growing up in Las Vegas, where his mother has had a residency at Caesars Palace since 2003, while trying to break away from the shadow of his famous parents to make a name for himself. READ MORE Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Twitter Celine Dion and son Rene-Charles Angelil pose at the 2016 Billboard Music Awards on May 22, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic) Login/Register With:last_img read more

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