Fort Worth Carnival Food Store and Fiesta Mart celebrate being named Blue Zones Project Approved Grocery Stores

first_imgAbortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Previous articleTCU honored as ‘Great College to Work For’ in 2015Next articleTarrant County College to celebrate “50 Years of Success Within Reach” The 109 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR printTwo grocery stores in Fort Worth are being recognized for providing healthier options and promoting sustainable lifestyles.On Friday, Carnival Food Store, 102 NW 28th Street, and Fiesta Mart, 2700 Eighth Ave. celebrated being named Blue Zones Project Approved grocery stores by hosting community festivities.The celebrations included music, food, and family-centered activities with various prizes.Among those in attendance, were Fort Worth City Council Member, Sal Espino and Mayor Betsy Price to promote the event.“The city is involved” said Espino. “We want to get the word out that everyone can make the healthy choice, the easy choice.”According to the program’s website, the Blue Zone Project is a community-wide well-being improvement initiative designed to make sustainable improvements to the environments where we live, work, play, and learn. The project encourages changes to the community that lead to healthier options.Don Bersterman, director of operations for Fiesta Mart and Carnival, said there is a focus on the Hispanic community in his stores.“As our partnership with Blue Zone Project begins with these two locations, our ongoing efforts to serve and enhance the well-being of the Hispanic community continue” Bersterman said.According to Bersterman, the stores have implemented many changes to encourage healthy eating habits such as fresh fruits along check out lanes and arrows throughout the store to help navigate toward produce.“Throughout the store you will see the arrows” said Bersterman. “Wherever your at you’ll find directions to produce.”Fort Worth is currently a Blue Zone Project Demonstration Site, according to their website. Over the next four years, the city will be implementing environmental changes in six key areas including worksites, schools, grocery stores, restaurants, individuals, and community policy.For more information visit www.fortworth.bluezonesproject.com Facebook ReddIt The 109 TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Facebook Twitter The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ Stories from the polls: Election Day in The109! The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ Linkedin Fort Worth braces for more severe weather Linkedin Twitter ReddIt TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students + posts last_img read more

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Press release: Welsh Secretary discusses Wylfa Newydd Future at Hitachi HQ

first_imgWelsh Secretary Alun Cairns met representatives from Hitachi at its headquarters in Tokyo earlier today to discuss the future of the Wylfa site in north Wales.It follows the announcement that Hitachi has suspended plans to build the new multi-billion pound Wylfa Newydd power station on Anglesey.The meeting forms a key part of Secretary Cairns’ visit to Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto and Osaka where he’ll meet with Japanese businesses who have significant investments in Wales. During the visit, he will set out the UK Government’s commitment to supporting Japanese investment in Wales and the opportunities ahead as we prepare to leave the EU.Following the meeting, Secretary of State for Wales Alun Cairns said: I am grateful to Hitachi for the constructive meeting today to discuss options for their future plans in Wales.“While I fully recognise their decision was a disappointment to people on Anglesey and across north Wales, the UK Government remains committed to developing a broad-based, resilient economy. We believe that nuclear has an important role to play in the UK’s future energy mix as we transition to a low-carbon economy, but any future offer must represent good value for both the taxpayer and the consumer. I look forward to future discussions on Wylfa’s new nuclear future and will continue to push for greater investment and additional job creation across north Wales.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Voices Support for House Bill that Makes Opioid Education Mandatory in Schools

first_img June 08, 2017 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Voices Support for House Bill that Makes Opioid Education Mandatory in Schoolscenter_img Education,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Public Safety,  Substance Use Disorder Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today voiced his support for House Bill 1190, which proposes a school-based substance abuse prevention and intervention program for all students in grade kindergarten through 12.“The measures outlined in House Bill 1190 will take the fight against heroin and opioid abuse to the next level – the classroom, where education plays a key role in prevention,” Governor Tom Wolf said. “I support this legislation because we know that even with the progress we have made in attacking the heroin and opioid crisis head on, we must do more – and education of our young people can lead them to make the smart decision to not use drugs now or for the rest of their lives.”According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, factors that contribute to the emergence of substance abuse in the pediatric population are multifactorial. Behavioral, emotional, and environmental factors that place children at risk for the development of substance abuse may be remediated through prevention and intervention programs that use “research-based, comprehensive, culturally relevant, social resistance skills training and normative education in an active school-based learning format.”Experts agree that the younger a child starts to abuse and misuse controlled substances and prescription drugs, the higher the risks of serious health consequences, adult substance abuse and eventual addiction.The legislation is sponsored by Representative Joanna McClinton, 191st legislative district, Philadelphia and Delaware counties.“The time is now that we get ahead of the opioid epidemic,” McClinton said. “Overdoses are rampant among our children and young adults. This bill will create a prevention and intervention program that will be taught in schools across the commonwealth to students in every grade.”HB1190 would require the Department of Education to work with the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs to provide guidance and recommendations designed to help school districts with the development and implementation of research-based curriculum guidelines for an effective age-appropriate, school-based program of instruction in substance abuse prevention and intervention.Each school district would be required to provide each school student mandatory instruction in substance abuse prevention and intervention every school year in grades kindergarten through 12. School districts would be required to integrate instruction in substance abuse prevention into their health courses or, if health is not offered in a specific grade, in any other appropriate curriculum required by the State Board of Education.The legislation outlines that the program would include instruction in both controlled substance and prescription drug abuse and misuse, including illicit drugs, such as heroin, methamphetamine, and cocaine; and opioids.Currently, school districts are required to provide age-appropriate information about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs for students in grades 3, 6, 9, and 12 as part of Pennsylvania’s Academic Standards for Health, Safety & Physical Education. The proposed HB1190 would mandate instruction in all grades and would expand the scope of K-12 education regarding substance use and abuse in the commonwealth.Governor Wolf has made fighting the heroin and opioid epidemic a priority. In addition to support of HB1190, the governor’s other legislative priorities that were passed by the General Assembly include:Strengthening the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program so that doctors are required and able to check the system each time they prescribe opioids.Better preparing doctors and physicians for prescribing opioids and pain management drugs improving medical school and continuing education curricula on opioids.Limiting the number of opioids a patient can receive at emergency rooms to a seven-day supply with no refills limit the number of opioids a patient can receive at emergency rooms to a seven-day supply with no refills.“Pennsylvania loses 13 people a day to heroin and opioid overdoses. These people are mothers, fathers, daughters, and sons,” Governor Wolf said. “It’s heartbreaking to families to lose a loved one and devastating to our communities and our commonwealth.”The state has equipped first responders, including law enforcement, and state park rangers with life-saving antidote Naloxone; and have even helped school nurses obtain naloxone medication, equipping our schools at no cost.“But, it’s time to do more,” Gov. Wolf said. “Battling the epidemic at the front lines is vitally important, but it’s equally important that we do everything we can to stop the epidemic from spreading by educating all Pennsylvanians, but especially our school-age children, to the dangers of drug use.”If you or someone you know is suffering from the disease of addiction, call 1-800-662-HELP or visit www.pa.gov/opioids for treatment options.last_img read more

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David N. Doerflein, 80, Brookville

first_imgDavid N. Doerflein, age 80, of Brookville, Indiana died Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at his residence in Brookville.Born September 11, 1937 in Cedar Grove, Indiana he was the son of the late Robert & Mollie (Fields) Doerflein. He was a veteran of the United States Air ForceDavid was retired having farmed in Franklin County for much of his life. He was a member of St. Michael Catholic Church, Fraternal Order of Eagles #1129 of Brookville, and the Bernard Hurst Post # 77 of the American Legion.Survivors include a sister, Arlene Scott of Ft. Myers, Florida, a brother & sister-in-law, Lee Roy & Carolyn Doerflein of Harrison, Ohio; as well as several nieces & nephews.In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by a sister, Carol Gruber, and a brother, Robert Doerflein.Family & friends may visit from 5 until 7:00 P.M. on Monday, August 20, 2018 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville.Rev. Vincent Lampert will officiate the Mass of Christian Burial on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 at 10:30 A.M. at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church, 145 East St. Michaels Blvd. Brookville. Burial will take place in St. Michaels Catholic Cemetery.Memorial contributions may be directed to St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church. Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to serve the Doerflein family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.comlast_img read more

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Murder charges dropped in overdose death case

first_imgVersailles, In. — Following a decision by the Indiana Court of Appeals murder charges against James Trimnell have been dropped. Trimnell was charged in connection with the overdose death of Rachel Walmsley in Batesville in July of 2017.Ripley County prosecutor Ric Hertel plans to wait for the pending court decision regarding Trimnell’s co-defendant Nathaniel Walmsley before moving forward. However, additional charges against Trimnell have not been ruled out.last_img

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Escape to Reality: Turn Off the Video Games

first_imgVisitation at national parks has declined significantly, reports University of Illinois at Chicago, correlated with rising use of video games and home entertainment.  “My concern is that young people are simply not going outdoors or to natural areas,” said a biology professor at the school, “but are instead playing video games, going on the Internet or watching movies.” Kids need vigorous physical activity and fresh air, the wholesome food of healthy living, instead of the processed junk food of artificial reality.  We all do.  Get outdoors and see the real world; escape to reality.  Let the Creation Safaris Photo Gallery inspire you.  Then turn off the computer and go take a hike.    Though the researchers measured national park attendance, we should remember that national parks are mere artificial boundaries put around particularly interesting parts of creation.  Don’t feel you have to pay the $20 entrance fee to experience the benefits of outdoor activity.  Many of the most striking pictures in the gallery were taken outside the national parks.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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SA, Japan sign science agreement

first_img2 September 2003South Africa and Japan have signed a memorandum of understanding to cooperate in the areas of science and technology.The agreement was signed in Pretoria last week as part of the sixth session of the South Africa-Japan Partnership Forum.President Thabo Mbeki proposed the partnership in science and technology during his visit to Japan in October 2001.Speaking at the signing ceremony, Arts, Culture, Science and Technology Minister Ben Ngubane said the agreement was based on the need to increase the number of women and people from previously disadvantaged communities entering the fields of science and technology.“The priority area in the agreement includes increasing the presence of new science missions in the two countries”, Ngubane said.Yasukuni Enoki, the Japanese ambassador, said the agreement was the beginning of a long relationship between the two countries. “We look forward to learning more from South Africa”, he said.The agreement also covers cooperation in biotechnology, information and communication technology, rural development, and environmental management technologies, which will be facilitated through exchange programmes of scientists from the two countries.The two-day South Africa-Japan Partnership Forum, attended by Japanese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Tetsuro Yano, also discussed the interaction between the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad) and the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD).Japan is South Africa’s most important trade partner in Asia, and the third most important in the world. Imports from Japan totalled over R19-billion in 2002, while SA exports to Japan totalled over R24-billion.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Researchers Test a New Type of Insulation

first_imgResearchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have helped develop a type of building insulation that combines vacuum panel cores and rigid foam. The new composite boards have double the thermal performance per inch of insulation now on the market. In an announcement, ORNL said that the modified atmosphere insulation (MAI) composite had resistance to heat flow “at least twice that of current building insulation materials made of plastic foams, cellulose or fiberglass.” “We’ve proven that MAI-based composites are technically viable options for buildings, providing higher performance than current insulations,” study co-author Kaushik Biswas said in a prepared statement.RELATED ARTICLESInsulation ChoicesChoosing Rigid FoamDoes Vacuum Insulation Make Sense? The results of their study were published in the journal Applied Energy. (A short summary of their findings can be viewed online for free, but the full article is behind a paywall.) Vacuum insulated panels (VIPs) are an established technology, but their use is limited. VIPs are much better insulators than conventional products, but they are expensive, can’t be modified in the field, and may show a loss of performance over time as the vacuum seal gradually degrades. For those reasons, VIPs are a specialty product useful in some situations but not as a replacement for conventional types of building insulation. The MAI composite boards were created in a semi-automatic operation and were much simpler to make than traditional vacuum insulation panels, lowering costs to within reach for some retrofit applications, according to researchers who worked on the project. Real world testing is underway In a telephone call, project manager André Desjarlais said Oak Ridge collaborated with two manufacturers — Firestone and NanoPore — to develop panels that combine fumed silica, barrier materials borrowed from the food industry, and polyisocyanurate foam board. Samples from a limited production run were installed in a low-slope rooftop in Caribou, Maine, over the summer (see the photos in the gallery above). The new insulation consists of MAI panels completely encased in polyiso. The composite has at least two advantages over the vacuum panels that have been on the market for decades: they’re much cheaper to make, and they should last for 25 years without a significant decline in R-value. A 2-inch-thick MAI/polyiso panel has an R-value of about 25, or R-12+ per inch — about twice as high as polyiso foam alone. By themselves, the sealed MAI packages have an R-value of 40 per inch. “The idea of having this encapsulated package and pulling a vacuum on it and getting a high R-value has been around for 40 years, maybe longer,” Desjarlais said. “The issue has always been one of cost.” In its early work with NanoPore, the lab learned that 80% of the cost of vacuum panels is in manufacturing. To lower the cost, researchers started with fumed silica, a common and relatively inexpensive nano material that already has broad commercial uses (it’s used to filter swimming pool water, for example). They combined that with an outer barrier material similar to what is used in the food industry to keep products fresh. “We’re basically taking a potato chip bag and filling it with dirt,” he said. “That’s what we’ve got.” The lab also worked with Firestone, a major producer of polyiso panels for the commercial roofing market. The group adapted an existing foam line and found a way to insert a dozen MAI panels inside a 4×8 sheet of foam. The facing of the foam is printed to show where the panels are located, so that if the roofing contractor wants to use mechanical fasteners to install the sheets it can be done — providing the installer is careful. In the Maine test installation, Desjarlais said, the roof was divided into thirds. In one section, installers used mechanical fasteners to put down the insulation; in another the sheets were fully adhered (no mechanical fasteners). On the last section, a double layer of polyiso was installed. So far, embedded sensors indicate that all parts of the roof are performing about the same. Desjarlais said he’d like to return to the test site with an infrared camera when it gets a little colder for a followup visit. Costs are coming down A major goal of the project was to find a way to make high-performance panels at an attractive cost. Loose-fill fiberglass costs between 3 and 5 cents per square foot per R, Desjarlais explained, while rigid foam insulation costs about 10 cents per square foot per R. “We’re about in the 20-cent range, where it used to be a buck,” he said. “We’ve made a big dent in the cost.” Although the new vacuum panels are not yet competitive with conventional building insulation, “it’s getting close.” A simulator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory used to test the performance of a new type of insulation panel. With lower costs, Desjarlais thinks the panels could have two important applications: retrofits for low-slope commercial roofs, and residential energy retrofits. Rooftops of commercial buildings are often crowded with mechanical equipment and access hatches, making it difficult if not economically impossible to add layers of conventional polyiso during an upgrade. Having R-25 panels only 2 inches thick would be a breakthrough when space is a key issue. Roofers would find the insulation very familiar. “We wanted to come up with packaging similar to what contractors see today,” Desjarlais said. “What better place to put it then right inside the foam board they’re used to handling. It looks like, it tastes like, it smells like a piece of polyiso foam. The only time you’ll know that it’s not is when you pick it up. It weights about five times more than a piece of polyiso foam.” Residential energy upgrades also are a likely target for producers. A 2-inch-thick panel applied to the outside of the house would be enough to meet current energy codes in the continental U.S., even if the house had no cavity insulation, Desjarlais said. One problem would be wall areas where standard 4×8 sheets or half sheets wouldn’t fit. Like the old vacuum panels, MAI sheets can’t be cut in the field without piercing the barrier and ruining the vacuum. The solution would be for a contractor to have standard polyiso on hand to fill in spots where the vacuum-panel sheets wouldn’t work. Better performance over time One advantage of making the cores of the vacuum panels from fumed silicate is that high R-values are possible without pulling a very “hard” vacuum, Desjarlais said. And, when plotting R-values against pressure, the curve tends to be very flat over a wide range of vacuum pressures, from 10 to 100 torr (torr is a unit of measurement for vacuums). That means the panels can afford to lose a relatively large amount of vacuum before their thermal performance fails. “We can over-evacuate it and have quite a bit of cushion in vacuum loss before we see any significant loss of R-value,” Desjarlais said. “We think we can get 25 years of service out of a panel if we evacuate to a certain level. Even if it leaks, the R-value loss is minimal.” Leaks should be less likely because the barrier material that’s used to encase the silica also is much better than what was available 25 years ago. Back then, vacuum panels relied on a two-component barrier of aluminized Mylar. Today, barrier materials are six or seven layers thick and don’t cost any more, he said. Coming to market? It’s one thing to develop a promising prototype in the lab, and another altogether to invest in manufacturing and marketing to get it to consumers. The panels appear to be working exactly as designed on a roof in Caribou, Maine, but will either NeoPore or Firestone feel good enough about its commercial prospects to bring it to market? That’s not a question Desjarlais can answer. Both firms are apparently weighing their options at the moment and have not made a decision. “I would say I’m cautiously optimistic,” Desjarlais said. GBA emailed inquiries to both companies seeking comment on how likely it was that the ORNL research would result in a commercially available product. In a reply, Firestone spokeswoman Laura McCaslin confirmed the company is working on the insulation, adding, “We can’t comment on any additional details at this time regarding commercialization or future plans for going to market as they have not been determined.” NeoPore did not respond. This post was updated on Sept. 25 to include new information from Firestone.last_img read more

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Google Glass Shows Off Upcoming Apps: Path, NY Times, Evernote & Skitch

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … taylor hatmaker Tags:#Google#Google Glass#Project Glass#SXSW 2013 Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Photos by Taylor Hatmaker. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Beyond what we’ve seen so far in the official videos and demos using Google’s own suite of products, Google Glass will also be getting some big-name third-party apps. At a somewhat last-minute event announced for SXSW 2013, Developer Advocate Timothy Jordan spoke to a room hungry for more intel about Google’s buzzy wearable tech, Project Glass. While he didn’t reveal a launch date, Jordan did say Google Glass has been working on an app with the The New York Times. The re-thought news reader app lets Google Glass wearers visually scan headlines and have stories read aloud with the device’s built-in speaker, which only Glass wearer can hear.Path will be another early entrant to the Glass app marketplace. Path is a social feed designed around tracking your life and sharing what you’re up to with your inner social circles. While a great many people don’t seem to know what to do with Path, its “in the background” ethos seems to make it a natural fit for Google Glass.There’s more than just news reading and social apps, too. Google said that productivity darling Evernote (and its image-snapping partner, Skitch) will also tie into Glass, letting wearers share and annotate images all while syncing them seamlessly with their accounts. Take a sneak peek of the first wave of Google Glass apps in the photos below: last_img read more

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