Trail Days Tragedy: Elderly driver injures dozens during annual hiking parade

first_imgAt least 50 people were injured at the Trail Days Festival in Damascus, Va., when a driver described by witnesses as an elderly man drove his car into a group of 1,000 hikers marching in the annual Hikers’ Parade. Witnesses said the car had a handicapped parking sticker and it went more than 100 feet before coming to a stop.Three of the victims were flown by helicopters to regional hospitals. Another 12 to 15 were taken by ambulance. The rest were treated at the scene. No fatalities have been reported yet.At a news conference, Damascus Police Chief Bill Nunley didn’t release the driver’s name or age but said he was participating in the parade. Multiple witnesses described him as an elderly man.Nunley said the man’s 1997 Cadillac was one of the last vehicles in the parade and the driver might have suffered an unspecified medical problem when his car accelerated to about 25 mph and struck the crowd on a two-lane bridge along the town’s main road. The driver was among those taken to hospitals.There were ambulances in the parade ahead of the hikers and paramedics on board immediately responded to the crash.The quick action by police, firefighters, paramedics—and hikers—may have saved lives. A Damascus volunteer firefighter dove into the car to turn off the ignition, and several hikers lifted the car off the ground to free injured people trapped beneath it.A donation fund is being set up to assist the injured, some of whom don’t have medical insurance.last_img read more

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McDermott receives offers to sell tech unit Lummus for over $2.5B

first_imgMcDermott International has received offers to sell its Lummus Technology business. The oilfield services company said the valuation of the tech business exceeded $2.5 billion.“Based on the receipt of these approaches, McDermott is exploring strategic alternatives to unlock the value of Lummus Technology while maintaining the strategic rationale of engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) pull-through,” McDermott said.McDermott’s Lummus Technology is a licensor of proprietary petrochemicals, refining, gasification and gas processing technologies, and a supplier of proprietary catalysts and related engineering.“With a heritage spanning more than 100 years, encompassing approximately 3,100 patents and patent applications, Lummus Technology provides one of the industry’s most diversified technology portfolios to the hydrocarbon processing sector,” McDermott said-“Lummus is an excellent business, with incredibly impressive employees, that has earned a reputation for expertise, innovation, and reliability in the refining and petrochemical industries,” said David Dickson, President and Chief Executive Officer of McDermott. “The process of exploring strategic alternatives is part of our ongoing efforts intended to improve McDermott’s capital structure, and we plan to use the proceeds from any transaction involving Lummus Technology to strengthen our balance sheet. While Lummus is an important business within McDermott, we have decided to undertake a process to fully realize its strategic and financial value.”Separately, McDermott said that its previously announced processes to sell the remaining portion of its pipe fabrication business and its industrial storage tank business are ongoing.McDermott has retained Evercore as the lead advisor on the strategic alternatives process for Lummus Technology.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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Liverpool star faces ANOTHER setback after suffering hamstring injury

first_img1 Daniel Sturridge Injury-plagued Liverpool striker Daniel Sturridge has suffered another setback after being ruled out for a number of weeks with a hamstring problem.The 26-year-old has only just returned from a knee injury which delayed his availability for manager Jurgen Klopp, who took over at Anfield in October.Sturridge has made just three appearances for the German and the last of those, as a 62nd-minute substitute in the 2-0 defeat at Newcastle on Sunday, caused another injury.It is understood Sturridge had a scan on Tuesday after complaining of an issue with his hamstring at St James’ Park.The result of that scan has revealed a strain and as a result the striker will be sidelined for weeks rather than months.Only last month Klopp said Sturridge had to understand the difference between “pain and real pain” as he prepared to make his comeback.This latest setback could see the Sturridge miss the busy festive period and leave Klopp with Christian Benteke and Divock Origi as his strike options, as Danny Ings is likely to miss the entire season with a knee ligament injury.Sturridge missed most of the previous campaign with thigh and calf injuries which ultimately led to a hip operation in May in an attempt to clear up long-standing problems but sidelined him for four months.last_img read more

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Young, gifted, black – and free

first_imgJustice MalalaI am not one to go ga-ga over birthdays. I am disconcerted, but not surprised, by the fervour with which many of my countrymen – and peoples elsewhere in the world – have embraced celebrations of Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday.I guess this is the point at which I should write that although I am cynical about birthdays I, too, am feeling a bit sentimental about this one. Well, actually not. The Mandela birthday celebrations have not really touched me much except for the fact that just the other day I heard that a former colleague had left her job. And that got me thinking about Mandela.“Mandela is 90 years old and I am going to see the world,” she said. And she was gone, just like that, to travel through the African continent.And I thought: Freedom. It never ceases to amaze me just how heady the freedom that South Africa has today changes lives. Every so often it hits me as young black kids take gap years to build dams in South America, or do something daring in Europe, how free and full of opportunity we have become.About four months ago a friend forwarded me an email that had been written by a colleague of his. The colleague was a young man in his early 30s who had decided to chuck in the job, buy a 4×4 and travel through Africa from Cairo to the Cape with a friend. And a credit card.Their journey was hilarious, harrowing, fun and adventurous. Every week or so the young man would find an internet connection, send mass emails and pictures, and take up the story of what they had been through. There were stories of lateness, of generosity, of promptness, of hunger and poverty. Africa was alive, ugly and beautiful and frustrating and fulfilling.If you are European this is not particularly new or even that daring. But this young man is a black South African. And that is telling. Eighteen years ago black South Africans were still living under the strictures of apartheid. Their lives and those of progressive whites were intolerable.Freedom. Eighteen years later, a minuscule time in the mammoth task of building a nation, these same “victims” of apartheid are not living under the depression of apartheid. They are free to express themselves as they wish, without fear of censure.My friend who has decided to travel through the continent is young and talented. She finished school, worked and rose up fast. She decided to go off and backpack through the continent.When Mandela became president in 1994 he spoke about how his new government was about extending the frontiers of human endeavour. Citing the poet Ingrid Jonker, he said: “The government I have the honour to lead and I dare say the masses who elected us to serve in this role, are inspired by the single vision of creating a people-centred society.Accordingly, the purpose that will drive this government shall be the expansion of the frontiers of human fulfilment, the continuous extension of the frontiers of that freedom.”Like many across the world, South Africa is today burdened by the international economic slowdown. Food prices are sky high and transport costs are being driven up inexorably by the rampant oil price. Plus we have our own massive challenges: HIV/Aids, crime and others.The “expansion of the frontiers of human fulfilment” that Mandela spoke about, in these tough times, is something very easily overlooked. But incredibly, it is here. I saw it just the other day when thousands of people queued across the country to buy shares of the energy parastatal Sasol in a public offering to encourage black participation in the economy.In those queues were young men and women, mothers and fathers and grandparents, all of them buying a stake in South Africa’s economy. The “frontiers of human fulfillment”, in a small way, were being expanded in those queues. Certainly, the camaraderie in those queues indicated to me at least that dignity had been restored to people.On a flight from Mauritius recently, I was incredible to see the number of black people – many of them young backpackers – on the flight. A group of them were chatting excitedly about their exploits. This is a scene that would have been a curiosity 10years ago. I am finding that it is a normal occurrence, just another fruit of our democracy and freedom, these days.I see nowadays, constantly, freedom expressed in so many ways by young South Africans who seem to have shed the hang-ups, the sheer weight, that those of us older folk seem to carry. They live, fully and untethered, a free life.It is in them, perhaps, that the spirit of Nelson Mandela is best expressed. He is not just a symbol of freedom. These young people, they are that freedom.Justice Malala is an award-winning former newspaper editor, and is now general manager of Avusa’s stable of 56 magazines. He writes weekly columns for The Times newspaper and Financial Mail magazine, as well as a monthly media and politics column for Empire magazine. He is the resident political analyst for independent television channel e.tv and has consulted extensively for financial institutions on South African political risk. Malala was also an executive producer on Hard Copy I and II, a ground-breaking television series on SABC 3. Hard Copy I won the Golden Horn Award for best television series. Malala’s work has been published internationally in the Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Financial Times, The Independent, Forbes, Institutional Investor, The Age and The Observer.last_img read more

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