NCVO warns fundraisers that more robust self-regulation is needed

first_img  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 11 June 2002 | News NCVO warns fundraisers that more robust self-regulation is needed However, he added: “It is my belief that we in the sector can and should manage these issues ourselves: government regulation is neither necessary and indeed would be inappropriate. I strongly suspect that the PIU is not minded to make recommendations to regulate. But I believe that it will fire a shot across our bows¦So we will need to act quickly to improve management practices and fully develop the self regulatory framework.”Warning against complacency, Etherington said: “Doing good isn’t good enough – not only do we need to ensure that we have ways to demonstrate the good that we are achieving. But we also need to have ways of assuring the public of the ethical practices we are employing to achieve that good. We are masters of our own destiny. The PIU may well play the ball firmly back into our court and will expect a decisive reaction if we are to pre-empt the imposition of regulation. But more importantly we owe it to ourselves and our supporters to properly address this issue.”Aruging for better self-regulation, he listed the various initiatives already in place or underway which are designed to protect public trust and confidence in the sector. These included:The Donors’ Rights Charter and Giving with Confidence initiativeThe Public Fundraising Regulatory AssociationA project being undertaken by the Voluntary Sector National Training Organisation to develop National Occupational Standards in FundraisingA Code of Conduct and ongoing development of Codes of Practice for members of the Institute of Fundraising. Doing good isn’t good enough, was the clear message today for fundraisers at the 2002 Fundraising Forum in London. Delivering the keynote speech, Stuart Etherington, Chief Executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO), told delegates that they may get a warning shot across their bows from the Government when the PIU reports back to Ministers next month.Opening the day-long event organised by Professional Fundraising Magazine, Mr Etherington argued that fundraisers should not assume that their more controversial methods, such as face-to-face fundraising were not posing any significant threat to public trust and confidence in the voluntary sector. He said: “the profession should be less defensive and more open about this still young, but promising, technique.” Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Concern over fate of journalist kidnapped by Sind bandits

first_img Follow the news on Pakistan PakistanAsia – Pacific News March 19, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Concern over fate of journalist kidnapped by Sind bandits RSF_en Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire Organisation Reporters Without Borders has expressed its concern about the fate of a young reporter who was kidnapped by bandits in Sind province on 4 March 2004.The abduction of Shabbaz Pathan, correspondent in Sukkur, Sind province for the daily Halchal, published in southern Hyderabad, was believed linked to a report by his brother, a TV journalist, on impunity enjoyed by bandits who infest the Sukkur region.Reporters Without Borders supports the Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists, which is calling on the provincial and federal authorities to do everything possible to find and free the journalist.Armed men seized Pathan in broad daylight as he left his Sukkur office. A boy of 16 was also kidnapped at the same time. They were apparently taken to Shah Belo forest near Sukkur, where the bandits have hideouts. The gangsters who are holding the journalist have made a ransom demand to his family.Asad Pathan, correspondent in Sukkur for the privately owned ARY TV and general secretary of the local press club, told Reporters Without Borders that the kidnapping of his brother could have been linked to a recent report of his on ARY TV about activities linking local criminals to some landowners.The head of government for Sind, Sardar Ali Mahar, has ordered the police to act in the case, but police efforts have so far not produced results. News Receive email alerts to go furthercenter_img April 21, 2021 Find out more Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists June 2, 2021 Find out more January 28, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information News PakistanAsia – Pacific Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder Newslast_img read more

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Breaking Cocaine Networks

first_img When the burned-out carcass of a Boeing 727 was discovered in the Sahara desert of Mali in 2009, it was not the result of transcontinental security cooperation. It was a chance discovery, as were 10 others. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) says “fleets of large cargo planes” are flying to West Africa full of cocaine much the same way, with no radar detection and no communication from the source countries – until now. AIRCOP, a UNODC, World Customs Organization and Interpol effort launched in late 2011, is aimed at establishing effective communication exchange between police and airports in Brazil and seven West African countries. The nations will maintain round-the-clock units to reduce illicit flows by reinforcing subregional, regional and international capacities through the initiative, with $32 million in funding from the European Union and Canada. West African–European partnerships are also starting to bear fruit in terms of maritime operations. Communications have flowed through Interpol at the Maritime Analysis Operations Centre, a multinational maritime security center based in Lisbon. “The key to solve the problem is intel sharing,” Col. Pinheiro said, speaking to Diálogo at the workshop held at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) in Washington, D.C. By Dialogo July 01, 2012 “We wagered that training law enforcement agents such as police, military, magistrates, judges and prosecutors, training them with respect to organized crime, money laundering and drug trafficking would promote an improvement in interdiction capacity,” said Júlio Martins, the attorney general of Cape Verde. Diálogo spoke to Martins as part of several interviews conducted with West African, European and Latin American security personnel who participated in a February 2012 workshop on countering narcotics and the illicit commons held in Washington, D.C. “This permitted Cape Verde to have a qualitative leap in the battle against drug trafficking in the region and practically dislocated the traffic from Cape Verde.” Traffickers using West Africa have had to identify other entry points in the subregion, ranging from tiny uninhabited islands to ungoverned swaths of the Sahel, for moving an estimated 30 to 100 tons of South American cocaine worth $3 billion to $14 billion to Europe. Like Cape Verde, Ghana, Mauritania, Mali, Senegal and other countries in the region are increasing their cooperation, information sharing and training, and strengthening their ties to source countries in South America and destination countries in Europe. With the rise of drug trafficking in the region, crime and violence have also spiked, with corrupting effects on local government and security forces. Drug use by West Africans has also risen. The leaders of counternarcotics organizations across the region have started to enhance South-South cooperation as a means of sharing best practices and learning from past experiences. “The essence is to disrupt the flow,” said Yaw Akrasi-Sarpong, acting executive secretary of the Narcotics Control Board in Accra, Ghana. “So, if we get information from the source and we are a transit country, it goes a long way [helping us to] intercept it.” West Africa became a choice trafficking route to Europe after the fall of the Berlin Wall in the ’90s, according to Laurence Aida Ammour, a consultant in international security and defense at GéopoliSudconsultance in France. Vast ungoverned spaces, poor regional coordination and little to no aerial and maritime radar surveillance provided ease of access. Weak laws and law enforcement meant getting caught was unlikely, and getting prosecuted less so. Soon, Colombian and Peruvian drug cartels were setting up shop in Guinea-Bissau. Sometimes these alliances “of convenience,” Ammour said, are between cocaine traffickers and the terrorist group al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) or the Tuareg rebels, who are wreaking havoc in northern Mali, strengthening both with cocaine profits. General Amadou Sagafourou Gueye of Mali noted that arms pilfered during the struggle for independence in Libya are now being used to protect drug traffickers and their routes. Colonel António Pinheiro, a professor at the National Defense Institute in Portugal and expert on African security, explained that drug traffickers flourish in geopolitical voids and ungoverned spaces, whether land, sea or air. The biggest challenge, Col. Pinheiro said, is a lack of political willingness and understanding of how serious the threat is. Months of surveillance came to fruition on the night of October 8, 2011, when 50 Cape Verdean elite judicial police members raided a garage in the densely populated Achada de Santo António neighborhood of the capital. The stash of cocaine they found was the largest in the history of the island nation and the biggest in all of West Africa that year: 1.5 tons of Colombian cocaine, $1 million in assets including cash and high-end vehicles, firearms, and nautical and telecommunications equipment to traffic drugs from South America to Europe. The Cape Verdean police had been working closely with Dutch forensic scientists on the operation, including monitoring a secret handoff of the drugs on Santiago Island days prior. Just 500 miles off the coast of Africa, and at the crossroads of three continents, Cape Verde had been a choice transit area for cocaine traffickers for two decades. Now, the archipelago is an example of the potential success of cooperation between military and security services in Europe, Latin America and West Africa. The Cape Verdean Government in recent years has signed multilateral agreements with Guinea-Bissau, Spain, Senegal, Portugal and others. Security forces conduct training to better detect and seize drug shipments. Laws were strengthened and judicial reforms were implemented to close more cases. Building Networks Speaking in advance of a meeting of the Heads of National Law Enforcement Agencies in Accra in June 2012, Akrasi-Sarpong discussed Ghana’s commitment to enhancing the region’s law enforcement capacity to counter drug trafficking. “We are committed. We have regular meetings. Best practices are shared at those places, but it’s about sharing of information, it’s about training each other,” he said, adding that Ghana has conducted training with Benin, Equatorial Guinea, The Gambia, Côte d’Ivoire and Togo. Sources: The Africa Center for Strategic Studies, International Narcotics Control Board, Reuters, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, www.jornaldigital.com, www.lajornadanet.com, www.spiegel.delast_img read more

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How the Islip Garbage Barge Saga Compares to the Town’s Toxic Dumping Scandal

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York One year after Islip marked the 25th anniversary of the infamous garbage barge that made it a national laughingstock—and all the environmental progress it’s made since—politically connected haulers allegedly dumped toxins in town parks.But calling the Town of Islip home is not all the two environmental crises share in common. Both also gained notoriety beyond Long Island’s shores, sparked inquiries of how the region disposes of its waste and will linger for years to come. Of course, there are as many differences as there are parallels between the cases—most notably, only last year’s incident resulted in arrests.“The town is a study in contrast,” said Adrienne Esposito, executive director of the Farmingdale-based nonprofit Citizens Campaign for the Environment, which gave the town an “A” on its recycling report card in 2008—the only one of the 13 towns on LI to earn such a high grade in the first year the audit was conducted.“They were very effective in implementing and pursing a successful recycling program…and that’s a great thing,” Esposito said. “But, on the flip side, we have the illegal toxic dumping scandal in the parks. It’s clearly two steps forward, four steps backward.”The recycling program is among efforts Islip officials launched to rehabilitate its image after six states and three foreign nations turned away the barge full of its garbage when allegations surfaced that it was tainted with hospital waste. That barge, the Mobro 4000, had set sail on March 22, 1987—28 years ago Sunday. When nobody would take it after six months at sea, the trash was incinerated in New York City and its ashes were buried in the town’s Blydenburgh Landfill.“The situation was a wake-up call about the sorry state of waste disposal in this country and lack of effective recycling programs,” wrote Nancy Cochran, executive director of Keep Islip Clean—a nonprofit anti-litter group that the town founded two years after the barge incident—for an article published last year in Great South Bay Magazine. “It’s a great example of taking lemons and making lemonade,” observed Cochran, who declined to comment for this story.Giving that lemonade a twist of alleged public corruption is ex-Islip Parks Commissioner Joseph Montouri Jr., who is accused of allowing companies linked to Thomas Datre Sr. and his son, Thomas Datre Jr., to dump up to 1,800 truckloads—about 50,000 tons—of toxin-laced debris at Roberto Clemente Park in Brentwood. The haulers are also accused of dumping similar debris at a Police Athletic League ballpark in Central Islip, a veterans housing complex in Islandia, and in wetlands in Deer Park. Properly disposing of that amount of acutely hazardous material is estimated to cost about $3 million at an out-of-state facility.“They did it pure and simply for money,” said Suffolk County District Attorney Thomas Spota in December upon announcing the arrests of Montouri, the Datres and three subordinates, who were charged with criminal violations of environmental and public health laws. The same motive was true for the garbage barge’s backers, who were trying to capitalize on regulations enacted at the time that had closed many small LI landfills, leaving only large regional dumps that forced trash carters to seek alternatives.In the illegal Islip dumping case, all have pleaded not guilty. The attorney for the Datres and their businesses has said the case is a manufactured scandal designed to cut off the family’s donations to the local Republican Party, which has the majority on the Islip town board. Either way, the fallout has only just begun.LITTLE LIESMarking a quarter century since the historic voyage of more than 3,000 tons of trash that nobody wanted was “Garbage Barge Revisited: Art from Dross,” an Islip Art Museum exhibit of sculptures and other works made from recycled material, held in the summer of 2012. The following year is when authorities now believe the toxic dumping began, although arrests weren’t made until December 2014, following a lengthy investigation.While both cases seem to have unearthed their share of public hysteria, only the barge became fodder for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and mock concert t-shirts, such as one that read: “Islip Garbage World Tour ‘87.”“That had humor,” said Russ Moran, an assistant town attorney at the time, while recalling “the good ship Mobro.” But the current dumping scandal—and the carcinogens authorities say they’ve found in the soil—is deadly serious. “There’s nothing funny about this,” he said.Funny or not, both also became campaign issues. Phil Nolan, a Democrat who unsuccessfully tried in 1987 to unseat then-Islip Town Supervisor Frank Jones, recalled making an issue of the barge debacle on the campaign trail. Jones kept his job until ’93. Nolan later won on his fourth try, in 2006.“The biggest parallel of all, I think, is the one-party control,” recalled Nolan, who is now president of the Suffolk County OTB. “In both instances there were 5-0 Republican town boards… It’s the Islip Republican Party that gave you both of them.”Frank Tantone, chairman of the Islip Town Republican Committee, declined to respond to Nolan’s remarks.One of the current town councilmen, Anthony Senft, is actually a Conservative Party member. As liaison to the Islip parks department when the scandal broke, he took much of the heat while simultaneously running for New York State Senate against Esposito, the environmentalist, who dubbed him “Toxic Tony.” After Senft dropped out, Republican Islip Town Supervisor Tom Croci, a Navy reservist who had unseated Nolan in ’11, entered the race and won the state Senate seat. He wasn’t tarnished by the dumping scandal because he had been deployed overseas when the news broke.That left Croci’s successor in town hall, fellow Republican Angie Carpenter, who had previously been Suffolk County treasurer, to clean up the mess that prosecutors allege Croci’s appointee, former town parks commissioner Montouri, helped make. Carpenter did not mention the scandal when she was sworn in earlier this month, but the town has a deadline of this Thursday on a request for proposals for contractors to bid on the cleanup job. Town officials have forecast that remediation and rebuilding the park will cost about $6 million, but suspicions abound that costs will rise.Croci said last year that he’ll help fix the disaster from Albany, but he did not return a request for comment on what exactly he has done on this issue in the first three months that he has represented the 3rd Senate District.“He has been very, very open about wanting to help in any way possible,” said Carpenter, noting that she hasn’t had an opportunity to talk specifics with Croci yet. The new supervisor—who recalls defending former Supervisor Jones in an episode of The Phil Donohue Show before she began her career in elected office—believes the town will clean up the mess sooner rather than later.“It’s not going to linger for years,” Carpenter said. “It’s something….we’re going to move on…as quickly, safely and responsibly as we possibly can.”DEF CON ONEWith remediation underway at the Islandia veterans housing complex and Central Islip ball field, some of the cleanup has begun, but regardless of when the Brentwood park and Deer Park wetlands are restored, the case is sure to drag on in court.Aside from the complex criminal case—which has sparked a separate grand jury investigation—several lawsuits are in the works related to the toxic dumping. Residents have said that they plan to sue the town, the town has said that it plans to sue the alleged dumpers and even the New York State Attorney General’s office might get in on the action.“Our office is also exploring the possibility of civil enforcement action to seek redress for the community surrounding Roberto Clemente Park,” said Elizabeth DeBold, a spokeswoman for Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, in a statement.In the case of the Mobro 4000 garbage barge, the litigation over how to dispose of its trash lasted only months. Complex lawsuits such as those in Islip’s dumping scandal will likely last years before being resolved.When exactly Roberto Clemente Park will be able to reopen, nobody knows.WHERE THE STREETS HAVE NO NAMEIf it wasn’t bad enough that North Carolina, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and New Jersey refused to take the Mobro’s rotting cargo, it became an international incident when Mexico, Belize and the Bahamas followed suit.Multinational elements emerged in the dumping scandal as well. That’s because the Islandia veterans housing complex was built for veterans returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. And the two parks dumped upon are in the communities of Brentwood and Central Islip, which are both among the few LI hamlets where Hispanic residents make up the majority of the population.“Community members in Brentwood and Central Islip saw this as another instance of environmental racism,” said Daniel Altschuler, Civic Engagement and Research Coordinator for Make the Road New York. There have also been language barriers between residents and the town that left some in the community feeling as though their concerns were not heard.The public outrage has led to multiple rallies at town hall, where advocates for the communities have blasted the town board for their response to the dumping at nearly every meeting since news of the scandal broke. Similarly, environmental activists with Green Peace hung a giant banner on the Mobro barge that read: “Next time try recycling.”The question now is: Will the Islip town toxic dumping scandal serve as the same wake-up call that its garbage barge did three decades ago, or will the town try to sweep it under the rug after the park eventually reopens?—With additional reporting by Jaime Zahllast_img read more

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House starts deliberation of job creation bill as protesting unions forced to stay at home

first_imgHowever, according to Saan, the House leadership has yet to decide whether the bill will be handled by the House’s Legislation Body (Baleg) or a special House committee (Pansus).Read also: House members lead campaign to donate salary to COVID-19 victims“We’ve suggested that it be handled by the Baleg,” he said.Speaking at the House’s plenary meeting on Monday, Saan said the bill was needed to mitigate the economic impacts of COVID-19. The House of Representatives will begin its deliberation of the controversial omnibus bill on job creation despite the coronavirus pandemic.The secretary of the NasDem Party faction at the House, Saan Mustopa, told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday that the House leadership had agreed to read the presidential letter to begin the bill’s deliberation at a plenary session on Thursday.”Yes, it has been decided in a meeting with the House’s [steering committee] on Wednesday to announce [the deliberation] in the plenary session,” he said, adding that the meeting had also been attended by representatives of all House factions and commissions. “We need to prepare for [economic] recovery […]. We should start deliberating the omnibus bills on job creation and taxation to prepare for the post-outbreak situation. We need to recover quickly,” he said.House Speaker Puan Maharani, who is from Jokowi’s Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), has appeared reluctant to process the bill. Of the six political parties in the government coalition, the PDI-P has been the only one to urge lawmakers not to rush, citing public objections to the bill.Responding to Saan’s statement, Puan said during Monday’s plenary session that the House would focus on emergency measures for COVID-19 at this time.Read also: House ready to support 2020 budget revisions to account for COVID-19Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions (KSPI) president Said Iqbal said deliberating the omnibus bill at a time like this showed that the lawmakers had no empathy for the people that currently were facing a difficult situation due to the pandemic.He said the House should prioritize the coronavirus handling rather than the omnibus bill.”The omnibus bill is not a solution to the layoff phenomenon following the pandemic. It’s not a solution for Indonesia’s economic growth problem due to the pandemic too. It is clear that the omnibus bill is not being prepared to anticipate COVID-19,” he said.Civil society organizations, major labor unions and student organizations had prepared for street rallies to protest against articles in the omnibus bill on job creation that — if passed — would harm labor rights, the environment and democracy. They also protested against the bill’s less-than-transparent drafting process.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Barca-Las Palmas in Shadow of Referendum

first_imgBarcelona can extend their perfect start to the Liga season when they take on Las Palmas on Sunday in a game surrounded by political turmoil, as it occurs on the same day as a planned referendum in Catalonia on a break from Spain. There was concern that the match would have to be postponed due to a lack of police resources as a result of the vote, which the Spanish government says is illegal, although it was given the green light at a meeting of Catalonia’s security council on Thursday.The Nou Camp has witnessed displays of pro-secession fervour in recent years, including chants of “independence” which take place after 17 minutes and 14 seconds in a match to mark the 1714 siege of Barcelona. Barca defender Gerard Pique showed his support for the referendum on Thursday – although he has never expressed his outright support for independence – but urged citizens to behave in a peaceful manner.“From today until Sunday we will express ourselves peacefully. We cannot give them any excuse, that is what they want. We will sing loud and clear. #WeWillVote,” Pique wrote on his Twitter account.Barca have positioned themselves in favour of the right to decide and released a statement last week condemning crackdowns on referendum activity which led to the arrest of 16 local government officials.“It will be an important day in the history of our country but we have to focus on football,” said Barca vice-president Jordi Cardoner.“I think that all members, fans and supporters will express what they think is right.”Barca lead the Liga standings by four points over Atletico Madrid after winning six games from six and maintained their 100 percent start in Europe by scraping a 1-0 win at Sporting Lisbon on Wednesday.They face a Las Palmas side who are 15th with six points from six games and reeling from the resignation of coach Manolo Marquez.New coach Pako Ayestaran takes charge of his first game for the club and has sweet memories of his last visit to the Nou Camp, where his Valencia side stunned Barca by winning 2-1 in April 2016.Las Palmas are facing an injury crisis with five players unavailable while Barca have no fresh concerns ahead of the game.Also on Sunday, Real Madrid will search for their first home win of the season in the league when they host Espanyol, who have proved generous opponents in recent years, with Real winning the last 10 games between the two sides in all competitions.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Raymond Taylor: Finding The Right Open Door

first_imgThat official separation of the races was very much part of life that followed Taylor when he was drafted and inducted into the Army in 1942. Taylor served in the all-African-American machine-gunner units assigned to the 450th and 207th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (AAA) Battalions. His units had served in the Alaskan Aleutian Islands before being moved to the farther Pacific theater, stationed in Australia. “Australia didn’t want us then, either,” he recalled, referring to his black fellow servicemen.Taylor went on to see duty in New Guinea, New Britain, Guam, the Philippines, “All the way to Japan,” Taylor recounted with pride.He ended the war with the rank of “buck sergeant,” the lowest level of sergeant, indicated by a three-chevron, with no rockers, insignia.Taylor returned to Fair Haven and then again to active military duty during the Korean War. He again served with the 450th Battalion, being involved in the landing and battle at Inchon in 1950, which became a decisive victory for U.S. and United Nations forces.He finished his military service with the rank of first sergeant; his brothers, William and Kenneth, both gone now, had seen duty at the Battle of the Bulge and elsewhere for William; Kenneth was part of the “Red Ball Express,” a famed truck convoy relying largely on African-American soldiers to provide supplies to the fast-moving Allied Forces making their way across Europe after the D-Day invasion.“I guess we got it in our blood,” to serve, Taylor observed.The three boys came to live in Fair Haven when Raymond was 7. Their parents weren’t in a position to care for the boys. They were taken in by John and Ella Bailey, who weren’t related but became their foster parents. The Taylor boys lived with the Baileys in the River Road home built by John Bailey, who worked as the lighthouse keeper at Twin Lights, Highlands.“Aunt Ella,” as the boys referred to her, was the child of former slaves who relocated to Fair Haven. Her father, Horace Corliss, was one of the carpenters who helped build the historic Bicentennial Hall/Fisk Chapel, still existing on Fisk Street. The site was the center of Fair Haven’s African-American community in the late 19th- and early 20th century.The Taylors continue to live in the Bailey River Road home, having raised their children there.Fair Haven was a good town to grow up in, both Taylor and Elizabeth said. As a child, she said, there were just two stores in town, one at each end, and only one policeman.“We had fun,” Taylor recalled fondly. “We would build wagons. We would go down to the river and jump in,” living the carefree life of the very young.Coming home from the Army in 1953, Taylor went to work for the Little Silver Board of Education, spending his career as a custodian at Point Road School, the district’s elementary school, eventually becoming head custodian. He retired in 1992, but not before establishing some lasting relationships with both teachers and students. “Some of those kids grew up with my kids, played with my kids,” Taylor said. And he cared for his charges, always looking out for them in small ways. “I always knew all their names,” he said.“I always lectured the boys who worked under me about what was expected of them,” in the school, he said. “To respect the kids, respect the teachers.”It’s been a good life for the Taylors, who have six grandchildren and six great-grandkids, who come to visit when they can. And a life that will continue in Fair Haven, if Elizabeth has any say in it. “I wouldn’t live anywhere else,” she said.For Raymond, his more than nine-decade life provided lessons. One of the most important, he stressed is, “The world’s open to you if you just find the right door.”This article was first published on the Scene Page in the April 20-27, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times. By John Burton |Memorial Day means a lot to Raymond Taylor Sr., who has spent most of his 94 years living in Fair Haven. As the day approaches Taylor takes out his U.S. Army uniform – the olive drab, old Eisenhower waist jacket that Taylor can still fit into, bearing the “three up and two down,” chevrons and rockers indicating his rank of Army first sergeant and his Distinguished Service medal and combat infantry badge. His Army cloth side cap can sit proudly on his head, now with the gray hair of age, the cap adorned with insignias of his former outfits, as well as noting his membership in the Red Bank Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 438, alluding to his experiences in World War II and in the Korean War a few years later.Taylor, barring his deployment for military service, has appeared at every Fair Haven Memorial Service since 1947, according to Mayor Benjamin Lucarelli. At the annual services honoring those who gave the ultimate sacrifice for their country, Taylor often offers a few words about the holiday’s true meaning and his personal experiences. “I just want to speak the truth,” he said. “I don’t write it down … I just speak whatever comes into my head and out my mouth.”And he said he plans to do it as long as he can, God willing, because “I understand what I was fighting for,” he said in his soft-spoken voice and with a steely glint of remembrance in his eyes. “I was fighting for the good of my people.”“His people” – Taylor is an American who served his country proudly in two conflicts and cared for his wife, Elizabeth, who is now 88, and their seven children. But he’s also an African-American man who grew up in the early part of the 20th century, a time when segregation was still very much a part of life.Taylor and his wife, who also grew up in Fair Haven, recalled going to Red Bank on Saturdays. She and her friends would walk there and back, Elizabeth remembered, “to save the 20 cents the bus cost, 10 cents each way.”Taylor said he liked to go to the Carlton Theater (now the Count Basie Theatre) to watch the “cowboy pictures.” But as an African-American, Taylor acknowledged, he would have to sit in the balcony.In his hometown at the time, blacks and whites attended separate churches and he, his brothers and black friends had a separate Boy Scout troop. Taylor was the first African-American to graduate Red Bank High School, back when it was on Mechanic Street.And the “’N-word’ was spoken,” he remembered. But, “We learned to live around it,” he said. He and his brothers, William and Kenneth, played with white children and had wonderful relationships with their families in the days before Fair Haven’s streets were paved, when they were simply covered with dirt or gravel. “Sometimes we stayed over in each other’s house,” as children, he said.last_img read more

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STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – THURSDAY JANUARY 15, 2015

first_imgPeter Miller3896424%$531,386 Mark Glatt2054325%$167,776 SANTA ANITA STATISTICS COACHING LEGEND BOB BOYD MISSED AT SO CAL TRACKS            Southern California horse racing lost an ardent supporter on Wednesday, with the passing of longtime USC basketball coach Bob Boyd, who died of natural causes at age 84 in Palm Desert.A star player at USC in the early 1950s, Boyd coached the Trojans with distinction from 1967-79, amassing a record of 216-131. Through 1975, he went head to head with the legendary John Wooden at arch rival UCLA, and Boyd became the only coach to ever defeat “The Wizard of Westwood” twice on his home court, Pauley Pavilion.A regular attendee at Santa Anita, Hollywood and Del Mar during his playing and coaching days, Boyd was an annual visitor at Del Mar throughout his retirement and regularly sat with a spirited group of longtime friends such as fellow coaches Pete Newell (Cal), Jerry Tarkanian (UNLV, et al), Dan Ayala (assistant to Tarkanian), Ed Goorjian (Crescenta Valley High), and Gene Victor (Mt. SAC).Coach Boyd is survived by his sons, Bill, Jim and John, and 10 grandchildren. For all of those who knew him, he’ll never be forgotten. Elvis Trujillo5195418%$458,448 JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%Money Won Joseph Talamo535979%$409,508 (Current Through Sunday, Jan. 11 FINISH LINES: Yes, that is Chantal Sutherland galloping horses at Santa Anita these mornings, but she has no plans for a comeback. She studied interior design at the Interior Design Institute in Newport Beach and also hopes to obtain a real estate license soon . . . Jockey Drayden Van Dyke‘s five-pound apprentice allowance is good through Monday, Jan. 19. On Jan. 20, he starts as a full-fledged journeyman, with no weight advantage . . . Victor Espinoza worked Zenyatta‘s first foal to make it to the races, Cozmic One, five furlongs Thursday in 1:03.20. “This makes the third time I’ve worked him,” Espinoza said. “The time before, I worked him from the gate. He feels great. John (trainer John Shirreffs) has been going easy with him, bringing him along slow. I don’t know how good the horse is, because I’ve never really asked him to run yet. ” . . . Tom Quigley‘s guests in the East Paddock Gardens this weekend will be HRTV host/analyst Scott Hazelton, Saturday, and Derek Lawson, agent for jockey Flavien Prat, Sunday, both days at 11:20 a.m. . . . Jockey Alex Canchari has been suspended three racing days (Jan. 17, 18, 19) for careless riding on Best Efforts in Saturday’s fourth race . . . A Celebration of Life for the late Dr. Jack Robbins will be held Tuesday, Jan. 27, from 2 to 5 p.m., in Del Mar’s Turf Club . . . Sign of Beelzebub: Life a Riley, a son of the late Bertrando who turns six next Jan. 1, has finished sixth in his last three starts. In today’s sixth race, he breaks from post position six . . . Bob Baffert isn’t showing his age. The Hall of Fame trainer celebrated his 62nd birthday Tuesday and took the occasion to get a senior’s discount at a car wash. His day was made when the cashier carded him. Rafael Bejarano591313822%$674,816 TALAMO SEEKS STAKES REPEAT IN MONDAY FEATUREJoe Talamo seeks his second straight stakes win on Harlington’s Rose when he rides her in Monday’s holiday feature, the Grade II Santa Monica Stakes for older fillies and mares at seven furlongs on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.Talamo guided the 4-year-old daughter of Harlington to a picture-perfect victory in the Kalookan Queen at 6 ½ furlongs on Dec. 28, rallying from a stalking trip to win by a length and a quarter.“She ran great; it set up for her,” Talamo said. “They went quick up front, and she runs her race every time, especially sprinting on dirt. She comes with that big run, so hopefully they go pretty quick and she’ll have a big shot.”Added trainer Steve Knapp: “She’s really sharp right now. We just asked her a little bit and she exploded in her work. We know she loves the dirt and she came out her race fantastic, so now’s the time to run.”Fans can “buck up” on bargain day at Santa Anita this Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, which completes a three-day weekend at The Great Race Place with another popular Dollar Day. On-track attendees can enjoy draft beers, hot dogs and sodas for a dollar each. First post time is 12:30 p.m. Victor Espinoza4178317%$486,130 JOJO WARRIOR STRETCHES OUT IN LA CANADAIf punters were caught unaware by Jojo Warrior’s uncharacteristic eighth-place finish at7-2 in the Grade I La Brea Stakes at seven furlongs on Dec. 26, join the club.Imagine how Bob Baffert felt. He trains the 4-year-old Pioneerof the Nile filly, who finished 20 ½ lengths behind victorious Sam’s Sister.“I was surprised at how poorly she ran,” Baffert said. “She was training great going into it, but you know what? She wasn’t effective going one turn last year, and when I finally stretched her out, she was a different filly.”That’s what Baffert is hoping for when Jojo Warrior runs in Saturday’s Grade II, $200,000 La Canada Stakes for older fillies and mares at 1 1/16 miles.“She’s been training well for this race, so I think she doesn’t want any part of one turn,” Baffert said. “That’s it. She doesn’t want to be rushed.”On the status of Horse of the Year and male 3-year-old finalist Bayern Baffert said: “It’s not that serious, but I haven’t been able to work him.“He just had an abscess (on his right hind foot), so I’ve got to be really careful with it. He’s day to day.”The field for the La Canada: Fleet of Gold, Alex Solis, 12-1; Sam’s Sister, Elvis Trujillo, 2-1; Lexie Lou, Corey Nakatani, 6-5; Thegirlinthatsong, Rafael Bejarano, 8-1; Jojo Warrior, Martin Garcia, 4-1; Une Cherise, Joe Talamo, 15-1; Ramona’s Wildcat, Kent Desormeaux, 15-1; and Colonel Joan, Gary Stevens, 12-1. Martin Pedroza4375516%$241,410center_img Kent Desormeaux4395621%$512,008 Tyler Baze701031214%$520,698 Peter Eurton2252323%$244,130 DISTANCE KEY FOR JOJO; BAYERN ‘DAY-TO-DAY’THIRD TIME THE CHARM FOR FLORAL ROMANCE?HARLINGTON’S ROSE SHARP FOR MONDAY STAKESARDENT RACING FAN COACH BOB BOYD PASSES Gary Stevens2054225%$236,630 SISE HOPES FLORAL ROMANCE SETTLES IN FOR MEGAHERTZCliff Sise Jr. hopes for an improved performance from Floral Romance when she runs in Saturday’s $75,000 Megahertz Stakes for older fillies and mares at one mile on the turf.The Kentucky-bred daughter of After Market owned and bred by Marty and Pam Wygod finished a disappointing ninth in Katherine Crosby at Del Mar last out on Nov. 7. The Megahertz will mark her third start for Sise. Previously, Floral Romance had been trained by Jerry Hollendorfer. The 6-year-old mare was third for Sise in the Swingtime at Santa Anita last Oct. 4, rallying after a slow start.“She ran great in the Swingtime, but when she shipped to Del Mar for the Crosby, she got very nervous in her stall, but she’s always shipped to Santa Anita well,” Sise said. “I have a window in her stall and she’s OK in there.Sise is back training full time after running Jenny Craig’s farm, “but when she closed it down and sold it, I went to Saudi Arabia a few months, then I came back and here I am, training out of San Luis Rey Downs.”The field for the Megahertz: Blingismything, Kent Desormeaux; Fanticola, Martin Garcia; Rusty Slipper, Rafael Bejarano; Nashoba’s Gold, Joe Talamo; Floral Romance, Brice Blanc; Winning Rhythm, Kieren Fallon; Industrial Policy, Corey Nakatani; Bee Brave, Gary Stevens; Oscar Party, Victor Espinoza; Magnificent Shirl, Martin Pedroza; and also-eligible Birdlover, Elvis Trujillo. Mike Smith3765616%$530,841 TrainerSts1st2nd3rdWin%Money Won Jerry Hollendorfer3996523%$799,552 Drayden Van Dyke574597%$284,886 Corey Nakatani3063420%$293,536 Mark Casse2143319%$287,150last_img read more

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Brentford on the verge of signing Anderlecht defender

first_imgBrentford are on the verge of completing a deal to sign Anderlecht defender Maxime Colin.The right-back, 23, has been undergoing a medical ahead of a move to Griffin Park.A former France Under-20 international, Colin joined Anderlecht last summer and has played 25 times for them, including one Europa League appearance.Brentford are looking for a right-back to compete with Alan McCormack after the sale of Moses Odubajo to Hull City.See also:Brentford’s Odubajo wraps up £3.5m Hull switchFollow West London Sport on Twitter Find us on Facebooklast_img read more

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10 months agoBatshuayi reveals influence on Chelsea Pulisic deal

first_imgBatshuayi reveals influence on Chelsea Pulisic dealby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea striker Michy Batshuayi has hinted an influence on the deal for Borussia Dortmund midfielder Christian Pulisic.Pulisic made a £58million switch to Chelsea on Wednesday, although he will return to Dortmund on loan for the remainder of the campaign.Batshuayi, who is currently on loan at Valencia, spent the second half of last season with Dortmund, where he formed a strong friendship with Pulisic.Batshuayi wrote on Instagram: ‘#AgentMichy. Happy for you bro @cmpulisic #specialtalent’.#[email protected]/2XpsW8ynAo— Jake Heasman (@jakeheasman) January 2, 2019 TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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