Flock, Now Ending, is Like a Hot Tub Time Machine for Tech Blogs

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#Blogging#Browsers#web marshall kirkpatrick Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Flock, a Web browser with loads and loads of media sharing and social features baked inside it, announced today that it is shutting down. Flock went out with a sigh and the news of its closure has been greeted with a shrug. Back in the old days, when Flock was born, things were very different. Five or six years ago when Flock was launching (it was a long, slow, hyped-up process), people loved it. Tech bloggers in particular loved it. It was, as PaidContent founder Rafat Ali said, “a new browser with a lot of geek-love.” Top bloggers are so concerned these days with saving face by constraining their enthusiasm that I thought it would be fun to look back at what some tech stars said about Flock back then. Their early reviews are like a time machine that offers a ride into a simpler, perhaps happier time in the tech blogosphere. I miss that time and thought you’d enjoy reading some highlights.The best early review of Flock came from Michael Arrington, founder of TechCrunch. His write-up (Flock: Social Browsing is Cool), three months after launching TechCrunch and when it was just him writing by himself, is full of misspellings, over-the-top enthusiasm about what seem like the simplest things today and a long list of links off-site to competing blogs. You don’t see any of that on TechCrunch today. I miss that.Arrington called Flock “a functional browser with excellent features (including firefox features like tabbed browsing, etc.).”“This is pure magic…Wow. I mean, really, wow.” – Michael Arrington on FlockOf what he called the WYSIWYG Blogging Tool, Arrington went double-rainbow before double-rainbows existed:“This is pure magic. We’ve tested most blogging tools out there…I have to say I think Flock blows them all away. I’m dying to show a screen shot, but Flock has asked it’s [sic] beta testers not to (so ignore the very, very small screen shot above). To show this right now would be pushing the limits of their trust, so I won’t.“But it rocks. …It has functionality for editing posts (even posts not created with Flock), quick toggle between preview and viewing the actual code, and, the best feature in my opinion, the ability to simply drag flickr photos direclty [sic] into the post and manipulate them. They also allow quick and easy technorati tagging. Wow. I mean, really, wow. This stuff is not trivial to build. The ajax funtionality [sic] is stunning.”We can chuckle at a review like that today but some of Flock’s technology was, no doubt, not trivial to build. More importantly, an HTML editor in a content management system that published to the Web was a revolutionary technology just six years ago! That’s how drastically things have changed.Matt Marshall, founder of Venturebeat, was similarly wowed by something that seems pretty basic today. Maybe Flock was just ahead of its time? Or maybe the other browsers on the market were just woefully slow-moving? His favorite feature in Flock, Marshall notes: “Pulling RSS feeds from interesting sites you visit is a matter of clicking on a button that Flock shows you in the address bar — presto, the feed is showing in your browser.”Our own founder Richard MacManus got in on the game as well, posting an audio interview with Flock co-founder Geoffrey Arone to Odeo, the podcasting service that would later give birth to Twitter.“What interests me most about Flock these days,” Richard wrote, “is its goal to become one of the big browsers. Geoffrey said they’re planning to go-live (out of beta) in October this year and he is confident that Flock can become a big player in what is a very tough market.”Richard’s post concluded with the sentence, “Geoffrey said that my questions were the best he’s had in any interview about Flock (which is a nice compliment!).”Poor Richard didn’t know he was just at the beginning of years’ worth of startups saying nice things like that to us – after they made sure to show our competitors, TechCrunch, their tech first. “…this move takes Flock mainstream…Smart move.” – Pete Cashmore on FlockPete Cashmore, the then-21-year-old founder of Mashable, wrote about Flock’s partnership with giant photo-sharing-site Photobucket in 2006 and linked to TechCrunch with credit for finding the story first! (That doesn’t happen very often anymore.) “I’ve often thought that Flock was far too geeky,” Cashmore said. “It’s only useful if you’re an early adopter and a heavy user of Flickr, del.icio.us and blogging tools. But that’s no longer the case: this move takes Flock mainstream, reaching out to Photobucket’s massive user base. Smart move.”It’s true – some of the leading voices on the Web today thought five years ago that having your friends’ photos dance around in the corner of your browser was something that was of interest primarily to power users of the social Web. Five years later, we assume just the opposite I think – who today would call Flock, or its follow-on effort Rockmelt “too geeky?”People say you know things have reached mainstream consciousness when The Wall St. Journal’s Walt Mossberg writes about them. Two years after the above tech bloggers ranted and raved about Flock, its features and its high-profile funding, Mossberg wrote about Flock that he’d “been testing a little-known Web browser.”Mossberg, back in 2008, was just trying to come to grips with tabbed browsers and the frenetic sense of obligation they imposed on him. “Even with the advent of tabbed browsing, which allows you to keep multiple Web pages open in the same window, Web multitasking can be a pain,” he wrote. “You have to constantly click back and forth among tabs if they contain fast-changing material you check often, like the status of your friends in social-networking services, or updates to news feeds.“Trying to share information with people on your Web-based networks can introduce another layer of digital jujitsu. It can be awkward to snag a photo or a snippet of text from one Web site and send it to a friend in a social network on another, or post it to your own blog.”Apparently Mossberg got over all that and hasn’t spent the last three years flipping back and forth from one tab to another to see if there have been any updates, or struggling to copy text from one website and post it on a blog in another tab. Otherwise he wouldn’t have gotten all the things done that he has since then.What Does it Mean?!My point is this. Looking back at the birth of Flock is amusing because so many people were so wide-eyed about things that seem so simple today. Maybe those things are simple now because people got so excited about them back then, though. Maybe that adorably naive enthusiasm, sung from the tops of growing blog-mountains, helped move the industry forward quickly. The five or six years Flock has been around might feel like a long time to those of us who think in 140 characters at a time – but it’s really not long at all!We were wrong when we said that Flock might capture the world’s imagination. It might be a little embarrassing to have been so wrong. I’ve tried to find something gushy I wrote about Flock and I can’t – but I write super-gushy things about freaky new technologies every day, and often I am wrong about their staying power.Dave Winer says that every generation of tech press moves from the outside to the inside, growing co-opted and comfortable with the leading vendors, giving up critical thought and concern for the real interests of users in exchange for getting intimate access to the big companies in the market. Maybe that’s true. But I think there’s something more human and hurt-puppy going on here than just that all our souls have rotted. I think the rapid acceleration of technology, history and cultural change, the exhausting pressure to report on that and the rough and tumble experience that being a new media leading voice can burn people out. You’re probably never going to read Michael Arrington write about something new again with words like “This is pure magic…Wow. I mean really, wow.”Some people will say that such unbridled enthusiasm was irresponsible. That it was dangerous. That it was fuel for a bubble economy wherein grandmothers would throw away their life savings on the IPOs of Twitter clients, only to be homeless in months. I’ll let other people issue those dour, if important (!), warnings.I want the old days of tech blogging back. Back before everyone was so jaded and conservative about what they get excited about. People play it safer today and I think it may be to the detriment of progress, innovation and users. It’s a lot less fun, too.last_img read more

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Video: D’Angelo Russell Whiffed Horribly While Attempting To Drive A Golf Ball

first_imgD'Angelo Russell swings golf club and misses horribly.D’Angelo Russell GolfOhio State point guard D’Angelo Russell is a likely top-three pick in next month’s NBA Draft. The freshman floor general is incredibly gifted on the basketball court, but his golf game could definitely use some work.Maryland guard and NBA hopeful Dez Wells captured footage of Russell attempting to drive a golf ball this evening, and it was not pretty. Wells recorded two Russell tries; the first one was a whiff, and the second wasn’t much better.Don’t worry, D’Angelo, you’re young. There’s plenty of time to improve your skills on the links.last_img read more

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HapagLloyd CEO Market Is Still Challenging

first_imgzoomRolf Habben Jansen; Image Courtesy: Hapag-Lloyd German shipping company Hapag-Lloyd managed to shrink its net loss in the first quarter of this year, however, market headwinds persist, the company warns.The company’s net loss for the period stood at EUR 34.3 million (USD 41 million), almost halved when compared to the last year’s loss of EUR 58.1 million.Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) reached EUR 219.4 million, also up from last year’s EUR 135.3 million.However, as the figures for the quarter include the contribution from the United Arab Shipping Company Ltd. (UASC), which merged with Hapag-Lloyd last year, the comparison of the figures can be made on a limited basis, the company stressed.“We have had a solid start into the current year, but the market environment is challenging. Freight rates have been under pressure, bunker costs and trucking cost in some important markets were up and we faced a weaker US Dollar, whereas higher transport volumes and synergies supported the result. We expect a gradual improvement of the market throughout 2018 – but most of that will only hit the books in the second half of the year,” said Rolf Habben Jansen, Chief Executive Officer of Hapag-Lloyd.Jansen’s mandate as the company’s CEO has been extended for additional five years.The company’s executive board said that earnings for the period were below expectations, primarily as a result of the significant increase in bunker prices and a changed cost structure due to the new service network.  Volatile freight rates and stiff competition are not making things easier moving forward.Growth has been reported in revenues and transport volume, with revenues increasing from EUR 2.1 billion to EUR 2.6 billion. Transport volume rose by 47.9 pct in the first three months of the year, particularly due to UASC, the company said.The average freight rate of 1,029 USD/TEU in the first quarter 2018 was in line with the last year’s freight rate of 1,056 USD/TEU, reflecting the competitive market environment.“Assuming that the general recovery of freight rates continues, Hapag-Lloyd’s average freight rate in 2018 is likely to be around the same as in the previous year,” the company said, adding that a clear rise in the average bunker consumption price is expected in 2018.“Provided that the expected freight rate is achieved and a significant portion of the synergies from the merger with UASC are realized, along with the expected improvement in the quality of earnings and the anticipated growth in volumes, Hapag-Lloyd is forecasting a clear year-on-year increase in its EBITDA and EBIT in 2018.”This also takes into account the one-off expenses of around USD 10 million resulting from the merger and integration.last_img read more

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28th Annual Talk Of The Town Gala To Honor Nancy ODell

first_imgAssociates for Breast and Prostate Cancer Studies, (ABCs), hosts its annual, star-studded Talk of the Town black-tie gala at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, Beverly Hills, Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017.Gala benefits breast and prostate cancer research at the John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence Saint John’s Health Center. ABCs president Gloria Gebbia is proud to announce that Patrick M. Byrne, founder and CEO of Overstock.com will be honored with the Spirit of Hope Award and Entertainment Tonight’s co-anchor Nancy O’Dell will receive the Spirit of Entertainment Award. Singer/songwriter Bret Michaels will perform and actor Taye Diggs will emcee. Sheri Rosenblum is gala chair and Beverly Cohen is décor chair. The gala includes a luxury boutique and silent and live auctions.“We are honored to celebrate Patrick Byrne and Nancy O’Dell at this year’s Talk of the Town and we are extremely grateful that they will be joining us to help raise awareness and support of our mission to find a cure for breast and prostate cancer,” said ABCs president, Gloria Gebbia. “For more than 28 years we have dedicated ourselves to raising much needed funds to continue the life-saving research being conducted at the John Wayne Cancer Institute, with the generosity and support of individuals like this year’s honorees.”“Our Institute is so fortunate to have such extraordinary and dedicated supporters like Gloria Gebbia and the ABCs,” said Patrick Wayne, chairman of the Board of the John Wayne Cancer Institute and son of the legendary actor John Wayne. “It is their commitment that enables our physicians and scientists to continue their groundbreaking cancer research for early detection and treatment and provide hope to cancer patients everywhere.”Patrick M. Byrne will be honored with the Spirit of Hope Award. In 1999, Byrne launched Overstock.com and in 2016, Overstock.com had revenues of $1.8 billion. In 2001, Byrne began Worldstock Fair Trade, an Overstock.com division selling handcrafted products from artisans in developing nations. Worldstock profits have been donated to fund philanthropy projects, including building 26 self-sustaining schools across Asia and Africa educating thousands of students. As a public service, Byrne created a pet adoption service that has connected people with over 100,000 pets since 2014. In 2010, Forbes magazine named Overstock the No. 9 Best Company to Work for in the Country, and Byrne the CEO with the highest employee approval rating (92%). In 2014, Overstock was one of the Most Trustworthy Companies in America as named by Forbes/MSCI ESG Research. Byrne believes that our nation’s success depends on education and capital markets. In 2012, Overstock became the first business with more than $1 million in revenue to accept bitcoin as a payment method and in 2015 Byrne used Medici’s t0.com cryptosecurities trading platform to become the first person to purchase a digital bond entirely on the bitcoin blockchain. Byrne made history again in 2016 when Overstock.com issued the first share of a public company ever traded on an alternative trading system (ATS) utilizing the blockchain’s distributed ledger technology. Byrne received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and Asian studies from Dartmouth College, a master’s in philosophy from Cambridge University as a Marshall Scholar and a doctorate in philosophy from Stanford University. Having taught at the university level, he is a frequent guest lecturer discussing internet commerce, blockchain, capital markets, Wall Street practices, education, leadership and ethics.Emmy Award-winning journalist Nancy O’Dell will receive The Spirit of Hollywood Award. O’Dell has proven to be a force in all areas of her career as a host, author, producer and entrepreneur. One of the country’s most respected and leading entertainment journalists, O’Dell is co-host of the most-watched entertainment news program in the world, Entertainment Tonight. Prior to her work at ET, she served as the co-host of Access Hollywood and was named one of Television Week’s “10 Most Bankable Stars in Syndication.” With more than 20 years of experience, O’Dell contributes to CBS This Morning and is a go-to anchor for live TV specials. She was a host of the American Country Music Awards and hosted the 2016 Grammy Red Carpet Live Special on CBS as well as the live Emmys, Golden Globes and Critics Choice Red Carpet Special for multiple years. For 17 consecutive years she has hosted the Tournament of Roses Parade. She is a member of the Academy of Country Music Awards and the was the original host and consulting producer for Nashville Star, as well as the host and producer of HGTV’s Celebrities At Home. O’Dell has been honored with three Emmy Awards, three Associated Press Awards and two Society of Professional Journalists Awards. After her mother passed away in 2008 from complications related to ALS, O’Dell became a National Vice President of the Muscular Dystrophy Association and serves as the spokesperson for ALS.net. In 2009, MDA, O’Dell and O’Dell’s family formed a foundation in her mother’s name called Betty’s Battle: Fighting ALS.Find out more about the event here.last_img read more

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How Our Womens World Cup Model Works

Check out FiveThirtyEight’s Women’s World Cup predictions.Women’s sports don’t have the same rich data that men’s sports do. So what do you do if you want to forecast the Women’s World Cup? You gather up everything you can get.We put together a database of about 8,000 international women’s soccer matches since 1971 — as many games as we could find. And we used these to develop a set of women’s national team ratings — we call them WSPI (Women’s Soccer Power Index) — and projections for the 2015 World Cup. The United States and Germany enter as front-runners, and you can read more about all the elite teams, the dark horses and the players to watch in our colleague Allison McCann’s World Cup preview. We’re here to take you through the methodology behind these projections.WSPI ratings are based on a simplified version of the Soccer Power Index (SPI), a system that Nate developed in conjunction with ESPN in 2009 to rate men’s soccer teams. Men’s SPI is based on two components: a team rating derived from scores of international matches and a player rating, which is primarily based on results from club play for the individual players on each national team’s roster. For WSPI, we use only the team ratings component because detailed data on club play is not readily available for women’s soccer.Otherwise, the major features of WSPI are similar to the team-rating component of SPI:Ratings account for the final score of each match, including whether the match went into extra time or a shootout, and the location of the game.Ratings also account for the importance of the match: A World Cup match counts far more than a friendly.A team’s rating varies continuously over time. For example, China had a considerably stronger WSPI in 1999, when it played the United States in the World Cup final, than they do now.WSPI ratings, like SPI ratings, are broken down into offensive and defensive components. The offensive rating can be interpreted as how many goals we would expect the team to score in an average competitive international match,1In the past, we’ve sometimes referred to SPI ratings as indicating how many goals a team would score and allow against an average international opponent. But that’s not quite accurate: The way SPI ratings are designed, they indicate a team’s performance in an average international match, controlling for strength of schedule and weighting by match importance. The same is true for WSPI. The distinction matters because stronger teams tend to play more matches than weaker ones, especially in women’s soccer. The average international match, in other words, is typically against a considerably above-average opponent. while the defensive rating is how many goals it would concede in such a match, controlling for strength of schedule. Higher offensive ratings are better. Lower defensive ratings are better.The offensive and defensive components are combined into an overall WSPI rating, which reflects the percentage of possible points we would expect the team to score in a hypothetical round-robin tournament against every other team in the world.Let’s look at a more detailed example of how a team’s WSPI rating is calculated. Here are some of the United States’ recent results, along with the ratings the team received for each match and the weight WSPI gives to the match: You can see some of the key features of WSPI in these examples (a team’s overall offensive and defensive ratings are a weighted average of these game-by-game ratings). The USWNT’s March 11, 2015, match against France receives relatively little weight, even though it was played fairly recently, because it was a friendly. The 2012 Olympics still receive quite a lot of weight, however, given their importance.2Unlike in men’s soccer, women’s Olympic soccer teams don’t have any age restrictions. The Olympic tournament tends to be almost as competitive as the World Cup. (The maximum possible weight for a match, in case you’re wondering, is 1.68.)Meanwhile, you can see how much strength of schedule matters in WSPI. The USWNT gets a higher offensive rating for beating France 2-0 than for beating Mexico 3-0 because France has a tougher defense. It’s not uncommon for a team to win a match against a weak opponent but receive poor adjusted ratings because it didn’t win by as much as WSPI expected. Conversely, a team can receive a good offensive rating just by scoring on a very good team, even if it loses. The location of a match is also important: Home advantage in competitive matches has historically been worth about 0.35 goals and would make the home team about a 60-40 favorite in a matchup between two equally rated teams.Once we’ve generated WSPI ratings for every team in the world, we can estimate the probability that any team will beat any other team.3This part of the model is “trained” on all non-friendly matches between two teams in the WSPI top 50 — matches that roughly approximate World Cup competition. More specifically, we first calculate the expected number of goals that each team will score in a given match and then convert these into a matrix of possible outcomes using Poisson distributions. Thus, in any given match, we’ve estimated the probability that it will end in a 0-0 tie, a 1-0 victory, a 2-3 loss or any other possible scoreline. Knowing this distribution of possible scores is important because the tiebreaker to advance to the knockout stage of the World Cup takes goals scored and allowed into account.With these individual match probabilities in hand, we can calculate the chance that each team in the tournament will advance to the knockout round or eventually win the tournament. To do so, we simulate the tournament 20,000 times: If the U.S. has a 28 percent chance of winning the tournament, this means that it won in approximately 5,600 out of 20,000 simulations. As simulations are played out, each team’s WSPI is updated to reflect its results in that simulation. Loosely speaking, this accounts for the possibility that a team will “get hot” during the tournament and considerably outperform its pre-World Cup WSPI.4For a more technical discussion, see here.Matches in the knockout round continue into extra time if they are tied at the end of regulation and a shootout if tied after that, so we’ve spent some time making sure our simulations handle these cases accurately. Extra time is treated as a shortened match in which teams score at a slower rate than during regulation.5Historically, teams have scored at a rate about 25 percent lower during extra time. Shootout win probabilities are also derived from WSPI instead of being treated as random. There is evidence that shootouts are skill-based — the team with the better WSPI rating has won 58 percent of shootouts in our database — but good teams don’t tend to be as dominant in shootouts as they are in regular time. For example, the USWNT would be more than a 90 percent favorite to beat Thailand in a regular game, but only a 71 percent favorite to win in a shootout. For this reason, it’s usually in the interest of the weaker team to play for a shootout even though it’d be an underdog if one occurred.Have any more questions? See Nate’s 2009 article and FAQ for more of the technical details and philosophy behind SPI, most of which also apply to WSPI. Or drop us a note here. We hope you’ll enjoy following the women’s tournament with us. DATELOCATIONCOMPETITIONOPPONENTSCOREWEIGHTOFF. RATINGDEF. RATING 10/24/14Chester, PennsylvaniaWorld Cup qualifierMexico3-00.963.10.1 7/28/12Glasgow, ScotlandOlympicsColombia3-00.803.10.1 3/11/15Faro, PortugalFriendlyFrance2-00.284.3-0.3 7/25/12Glasgow, ScotlandOlympicsFrance4-20.808.11.3 10/15/14Kansas City, KansasWorld Cup qualifierTrinidad & Tobago1-00.960.30.4 read more

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Scotts helping hand sparks newlook Buckeyes

Senior guard Shannon Scott (3) dribbles the ball during a game against Marquette on Nov. 18 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 74-63.Credit: Muyao Shen / Lantern photographerIn the first two games of the 2013-14 season, the Ohio State men’s basketball team tallied 27 assists.Through two games this season, Shannon Scott has 25.The No. 20 Buckeyes — playing without their top three scorers from last season — are 2-0 and shooting 63.3 percent from the field in those two games.After OSU’s 74-63 win against Marquette on Tuesday, Scott — who had 14 of the team’s 23 assists in the game — said his teammates have a different offensive mindset than they did a year ago.“I think last year, we would play the same way at times, but players didn’t know if they wanted to shoot the ball or not,” Scott said. “I think this year everybody knows that when they touch the ball, it’s gonna be their shot, and they gotta make the shot.”Against the Golden Eagles, making the shot is exactly what the Buckeyes did, and what they have done consistently through 80 minutes of basketball this year. With five new players contributing to the scoring output, the shooting — and making — has come on the shoulders of a variety of players.Including a true freshman, a redshirt-freshman and a redshirt-senior playing in their first seasons at OSU, six different Buckeyes have scored in double figures at some point this season. Four of those six players have averaged double digits through two games, and two of those four didn’t take the court last season.The distribution of scoring has led to all 10 OSU players who have taken the court this season scoring on both games.With senior forward Sam Thompson, senior centers Amir Williams and Trey McDonald, redshirt-senior forward Anthony Lee, sophomore forward Marc Loving, redshirt-freshman guard Kam Williams, freshman guard D’Angelo Russell, freshman forwards Keita Bates-Diop and Jae’Sean Tate and himself all contributing points, Scott said the Buckeyes already have a good idea of how they each fit into the team dynamic.“Just the simple fact that everybody came in and contributed in some aspect of the game is just a great feeling,” Scott said Tuesday. “And I think everybody has a better understanding of what their role is.”The wide range of contribution has helped Scott excel as a distributor, as he picked up 11 assists in the opener against the University of Massachusetts-Lowell last Friday before his 14 helpers against Marquette.Those 14 assists are tied for the second most in a single game in school history, but Scott attributed the big numbers to his teammates and not his own play.“I just have so many weapons around me, it makes the game a lot easier,” he said. “Kam came into the game, played great. Amir played well.“Sam, Marc, D’Angelo, Jae’Sean, Kam, Keita, Trey, Anthony, everybody played well. So having so many weapons around me, it makes the game a lot easier for me.”After the Buckeyes’ hot hand from 3-point land carried them to a seven-point halftime lead against the Golden Eagles, they moved inside and scored 32 points in the paint in the second half. Coach Thad Matta credited Scott’s ability to push the team for the second-half switch on offense.“I think Shannon was able to open things up a little bit and obviously Sam running in transition,” Matta said after the game. “I think our bigs are really doing a good job of getting down the floor as well which opens things up.”Scott said the team’s mindset has changed from a year ago, allowing for the more free-flowing offense OSU has run so far this season.“I think everybody just has the mindset this year that we’re not gonna take any plays off on the offensive end,” he said. “We played so hard on defense the last couple years that we kind of forgot about offense.”Perhaps contributing to his recent success passing the ball, Scott added that the Buckeyes have more of a plan on offense than they did last year as well.“This year we know when we get the ball we’re gonna attack every time,” Scott said. “You can ask Kam and Amir the same thing, we’re all attacking every time we touch the ball, and that makes it a lot easier for all of us.”Apart from the new-look offense, Amir Williams said the Buckeyes have benefited from a change to their defensive philosophy as well after switching to a zone look.“We have so much length and quickness on defense,” he said after the Marquette game. “It allows us to attack our opponents better than last year. We have guys doing a great job of covering the gaps, and we’re definitely still working out the kinks, but so far it’s been working very well for us.”As the team transitions its mindset on both sides of the ball, Scott has helped lead a high-flying young roster to a fresh start to begin a potential-laden season. But with the rest of the year an unknown, one thing is for sure. If Lee had flown just a little higher on one dunk attempt, Scott would have made his mark in the records books, and not just on recent box scores.Amir Williams and Kam Williams combined to let out a long “oooh” when they found out Scott was just a Lee-missed-dunk away from tying former Buckeye Aaron Craft’s program record of 15 assists, but the fourth-year veteran took it in stride, and instead looked ahead to another chance.“It’s OK, we’ll just try to get it again, another game or something,” Scott said.OSU is scheduled to return to the court on Sunday against Sacred Heart at the Schottenstein Center. 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Guild approaches Imran Khan to ensure participation of Pakistani Publishers at Kolkata

first_imgKolkata: Keen to rope in publishers from Pakistan for the first time in the history of the International Kolkata Book Fair (IKBF), the organisers have written to the country’s Prime Minister Imran Khan seeking his intervention, an official said on Friday. “We have written to the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Imran Khan on November 28 and am hopeful of the country’s participation for the first time as six publishers have shown interest in our invitation,” secretary of the Publishers and Booksellers Guild Tridib Chatterjee said. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe 12-day event, beginning January 30, 2019, is slated to be inaugurated by Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee. The central American nation Guatemala — the heart of the Mayan World — is the focal country this time along with participating countries such as the UK, the US, Russia, China, Japan, Vietnam, 11 Latin American countries and Bangladesh. He said he had approached the National Book Foundation of Pakistan in September and spoken to them. Not hearing from them even after two months, the Guild decided to seek the help of Pakistan’s Prime Minister. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedChatterjee recalled that Khan, World Cup winning Pakistan cricket captain, was one of the speakers at the Kolkata Literature Festival, a highlight of the IKBF, in 2012. “He came to the Book Fair in 2012 and experienced the gathering and footfall himself. So we requested him to look into the matter,” he said. The organisers are hopeful as the participants and publishers have already applied for the Visa. “We wrote to him reminding about 2012 when he was a special guest and visited Kolkata Literature Festival.. That time he was a participant but not a Prime Minister, now things have changed,” Chatterjee said. Khan had himself seen the craze among the Abook lovers of Kolkata and the excitement surrounding the fair. “So we are hoping for the best,” Chatterjee added. With the fair’s regular venue Milan Mela still undergoing renovation, the fair would be held at the Central Park in Salt Lake this year too, and stalls of approximately 600 publishers and 200 small magazines will be set up. Also, the sixth Kolkata Literature Festival, will be held from February 7 to 9 and the book fair wraps up on February 10.last_img read more

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