Young victims remembered

first_imgElize Venter, one of the survivors, stands at the memorial. Most of the victims are buried in the Heroes Acre at the Westpark Cemetery.(Images: Lucille Davie)MEDIA CONTACTS • Elize VenterSurvivor, Westdene Dam disaster+27 82 434 2989RELATED ARTICLES• SA’s youth can beat drugs• Young people: own your destiny!Lucille DavieDewald van Dyk’s shoes lie in the murky depths of Westdene Dam in Johannesburg. They have been there since 1985, when he dived into the dark waters again and again to pull out children whose school bus went into the dam.Van Dyk was a paramedic at the time, and he was part of the emergency services team that arrived at the dam 15 minutes after the accident happened. There were 76 schoolchildren on the bus that day; only 34 survived. They ranged in age between 13 and 17, and were catching the bus home from school on Wednesday, 27 March 1985.This year, on Youth Day, 16 June, the executive mayor of Johannesburg, Parks Tau, visited several sites in the city to commemorate children who had died in various incidents. He visited Alexandra, where pupils marched on 18 June 1976, two days after Soweto exploded in student revolts. What started as a peaceful march was a protest against the imposition of Afrikaans in township schools.Several hundred people were gunned down by police in Johannesburg on 16 June 1976, and as the riots spread across the country, the body count rose to over 560. A plaque was unveiled at Realugile School in Alexandra, and a red-bricked trail will be created to mark the route taken by the children.The mayor and other city officials laid a wreath at Westdene Dam, at the memorial erected in 2009 to mark the tragedy. He then moved on to Soweto, where wreaths were laid at the Hector Pieterson Memorial. Twelve-year-old Hector was the first child to die on the tragic day back in 1976, and Sam Nzima’s iconic image of his unconscious body being carried by fellow student Mbuyisa Makhubo, with Hector’s sister, Antoinette Sithole, running alongside, has come to symbolise apartheid oppression.At the dam Tau said: “To lose a family member is difficult but to lose someone so young must be doubly difficult.” Survivors and those involved in the rescue remembered the day on the weekend.Roof of the busAs Van Dyk drove down the low hill to the dam, minutes after the accident, he could see the roof of the bus on the surface of the water. He took off his tunic as he dashed for the water, and dived in. He tried to break a window with his knee but with the water pressing against both the inside and the outside of the window, he couldn’t budge it. He swam to the side of the dam and retrieved a jack from one of the ambulances.With this, he managed to break open a window, and pulled out Reinett du Plooy. He tried to resuscitate her on the roof of the bus which protruded from the water. She vomited into his mouth, and he swam with her to the side, where he handed her over to the paramedics on the road. But Van Dyk got to her too late – Reinett didn’t make it.“The time was too long. In five minutes the brain is dead,” says Van Dyk.It was chaotic, with children being dragged from the bus, some to survive, but most already dead. For Van Dyk it became a recovery operation that lasted until midnight. He and his colleagues repeatedly dived into the water to retrieve the bodies, helped by bystanders. Several pupils also stepped in to save some lives.Eurika du Plessis was pulled unconscious from the bus by her brother, Theo de Kooker. He dragged her through one of the small ventilation windows by her foot, and brought her to the surface where he laid her on the bus roof. She was near to death, and had turned black, but he opened her mouth and pulled out her tongue, water rushed out of her, and she breathed again.Of the experience, Eurika said: “I experienced a feeling of dying, I felt as if I was going towards a light, then I was pulled away from the light although I kept my eyes on it, then I was suddenly awake on top of the bus. I should have died.”Her brother was so traumatised by the experience that 28 years after the accident, he still won’t speak about it. But that day he saved five other children and received the Dirkie Uys and Wolraad Woltemade awards for bravery. Another boy, 17-year-old Pieter Koen, rescued five of his schoolmates from the bus, but he did not return from his sixth dive. He received a bravery award posthumously.Van Dyk recounts that a police constable dived into the water. He pulled out a girl, and when he saw it was his niece, he shouted out, “Oh, my God!” His niece was dead, and in his distress, Van Dyk says, the policeman himself had to be rescued from the water: “He nearly drowned.”His colleague, Eddie Haskins, went down for the driver, Willem Horne, says Van Dyk. “I didn’t even think about the driver; I just wanted to save the kids,” he explains.Unconscious driverHaskins found the driver unconscious behind the wheel, and pulled him to the surface and saved his life. Horne was charged with culpable homicide but the judge acquitted him after it was ascertained that he had blacked out and swerved into the dam. He had been assaulted four years previously, and suffered occasional black-outs.He was well-liked by the children, says Chantal Parkin, another survivor. She was walking to the door of the bus as she was going to disembark at the stop after the dam, she recalls.“I saw the bus burst through the fence. It shook as it broke the fence. I bumped my head, then took a last breath before I lost consciousness,” she explains. She was cut on her forehead and her legs, and fragments of glass were found inside her underwear, but somehow – she can’t remember – she swam to the surface. She rested on the roof of the bus, where she saw the driver spread out. “There was foam coming out of his mouth. I put something under his head. He was unconscious.”She swam to the wall, then to the edge of the dam when she realised the dam wall was too high for her to climb up. “The driver did not do it on purpose. The kids never threatened him; they liked him.”This was a time in South Africa’s history when racial tensions were particularly volatile, as apartheid was unwinding. Horne was coloured, and there was a suggestion by the parents who lost children that he was intent on killing white children.He had to be kept under police guard at the hospital because a father had appeared with a gun, threatening to shoot him.Parkin says that today she swims and loves being in the water, but nobody must come near her or touch her. But she doesn’t like the dark – it makes her feel claustrophobic. When walking into her home she switches on all the lights. “If I don’t I feel as if I am falling somewhere into a dark pit or hole.”Van Dyk, who is now retired, says that when he’s alone, he thinks about his ambulance career, and he remembers the Westdene Dam disaster as “the ugliest scene”.“It was the ugliest day of my life,” he shudders. He ponders that if the water had been colder perhaps more lives would have been saved as the cold water would have stopped the heart temporarily, to be resuscitated shortly afterwards. “I always would have liked to do something more.”Most of the victims of the bus crash are buried in the Heroes Acre of the Westpark Cemetery in Montgomery Park in Joburg.last_img read more

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How Low Oil Prices Can Be Good for the Environment

first_imgOver the past year and a half, oil prices have declined from over $100 a barrel to less than $35 a barrel. Should environmentalists be worried that this will cause people to turn away from clean energy and fail to meet climate pollution goals?In my judgment, no. On balance, the break from high oil prices can be good for the environment. I believe we should celebrate our good fortune if we are entering a period of lower energy prices. But we must make sure that we do not squander the benefits by weakening our resolve to transition to efficiency and clean energy supply. We must instead expand our efforts to provide a suite of carrots and sticks, new regulations in some areas and reduced regulation in others, to encourage more efficient transportation systems, which account for the lion’s share of oil use.Low prices do not mean that oil is “cheap,” since the true costs of oil include the damage to our health, to the world’s climate, to American national security, to economic stability, and to the environments where oil drilling takes place. These costs are usually invisible to the consumer. But they are real, and they represent an irresponsible if unintended policy to shift costs from producers and consumers of oil to the general public. RELATED ARTICLES Low oil prices can deter some of the dirtiest energyMany of the dirtiest oil resources are expensive. They only make sense when oil prices are high. If oil prices remain low, it should help discourage new investments in high-cost oil extraction, such as in the Arctic and the Canadian tar sands. And it will also reduce fracking and tight oil (“shale oil”) production projects.At current oil prices, infrastructure projects like the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline stop being viable investments. However, at prices only slightly below $70 a barrel, pipeline projects like Keystone XL become even more of a threat to the environment: they would enable economically marginal tar sands projects that otherwise would not be economical to move forward by providing cheap transportation capacity. This is a reason why stopping this project when we did was so important. But at current prices, neither tar sands nor the pipeline pencil out.Stopping tar sands production is a big win for the environment because the tar sands have a higher carbon footprint than other sources of oil, and because production is especially damaging to the local environment. Some of the other projects impacted by low oil prices produce, as a by-product, natural gas that oil and gas producers choose not to transport to market today — primarily due to the economics of building new pipelines compared to current low gas prices — and so it is flared at the well, producing extra carbon pollution.Already, major oil companies are announcing the cancellation of environmentally damaging drilling projects, and I anticipate more to come.Low oil prices do not stop oil drilling — all of which is environmentally damaging to a greater or lesser extent. Drilling, fracking, and ongoing production have adverse effects on health, the local economy, the livability of a community, or the local ecology. Some areas can be drilled at a low price, and still require careful regulation to prevent or minimize impacts.Environmentalists cannot slacken in our vigilance to stop inappropriate oil production schemes.Just because a project becomes uneconomic does not mean it will necessarily be cancelled: sometimes oil companies are more interested in winning than in profits, or in cross-subsidizing operations to lock in leases for down the road when they expect prices to rise again. Also, oil service companies make money on drilling regardless of whether the project they are constructing does. So some inappropriate projects may go forward unless they are stopped by policy. Some of these invisible costs are saved as low oil prices make some of the worst projects financially infeasible, and reduce the flow of money to regimes that promote global instability.Today’s low oil prices, and the market expectation that they will remain low for almost a decade — futures markets expect them not to recover to even $60 as far out as these markets go, which is 2024 — will cause many oil production plans to be canceled, which is a good thing from an environmental perspective. (I expect that oil prices will not remain low that long unless we can deploy clean energy strategies faster than we are doing now, which I will discuss later, and others agree.) Here is a link to Part 2 of Goldstein’s blog series: The Effect of Low Oil Prices on Climate Emissions. High prices do not promote efficiencyThe bulk of clean energy resources are energy efficiency, and all the evidence I have seen shows that efficiency is only minimally affected by price. Behavior — such as driving more — is affected by price, but the size of this effect is small. This issue is discussed in detail in the accompanying blog..What if you are not convinced that low prices have such a benign (if still directionally bad) influence on oil consumption?Then you should be supporting a pollution fee. A pollution fee could restore oil prices to consumers to a level that you feel is appropriate. Perhaps that means the level that they were at before the decrease: about $110-120 a barrel. If $110-120 a barrel for the consumer is an appropriate price for oil, we should charge producers a fee of somewhere about $80 a barrel. Notwithstanding the arguments I make here, I think that such a fee is a good idea. It is fair, in that it makes those who benefit from oil consumption compensate those who are hurt by it. And even if it doesn’t have a large effect on consumption it still moves the nation in the right direction.And think of what it could do to the federal government deficit! An $80 a barrel fee would eliminate the deficit. (The Energy Information Administration finds that the United States consumed 6.97 billion barrels of oil in 2014. Thus a fee of $80 a barrel would generate about $550 billion a year. In comparison, for FY2015 and FY2016 the deficit is about $450 billion each year.)Note that I am not arguing that the correct amount of the fee is $80 a barrel. Lower amounts may make more sense. Nor am I arguing that deficit reduction is the best use of the money: investments in clean energy transportation alternatives would be far better for both the economy and the environment. But if you think low oil prices are a problem, you ought to be proposing a solution rather than sitting in a corner wringing your hands.But a fee would address both the supply-side and the demand-side environmental issues by encouraging conservation and discouraging production. The Effect of Low Oil Prices on Climate Emissions Green Building in the Cheap Energy EraEnergy Predictions for 2012Designing for the FutureU.S. Wind Energy Prices Hit an All-Time LowThe End of Peak Oil?PV Systems Have Gotten Dirt CheapThe Big Allure of Cheap PVcenter_img Profiting from today’s lower oil pricesLower prices for oil and for gasoline save consumers money, and this is good for the economy in the short term. We celebrate these consumer and business savings. Amory Lovins has noted that energy price is a race between efficiency and depletion (actually a race between efficiency plus renewables and depletion). We rejoice that the market in 2016 is telling us that clean energy is pulling ahead.But we do so with the memory that price cuts (or spikes) are not permanent. At some point, perhaps next year, more likely in 5 years, and possibly not for 10 years, oil prices may go up again. We want to approach that time prepared, with a drastically reduced dependence on volatile-priced fossil fuels. Indeed, this reduced dependence may prevent prices from ever going up much.Yes, I noted above that futures markets expect oil to remain well below $60 for ten years. But we’ve seen this movie before — especially in the early 1980s and the late 1990s. Futures markets are thin and volatile, and often fail dramatically to predict the future. In particular, oil futures markets predict that today’s lower prices will fade away. Such predictions may encourage producers to hang on when they should be shutting down, and thus become self-defeating, because they result in overproduction and reductions in price when markets are expecting small increases.While lower oil prices may help the economy in the short term, in the long term the states and countries with strong policies supporting clean energy do better economically than those that are less active, and spend less on energy even in those cases when energy prices are higher. (They spend less because diminished consumption due to efficiency means bills are lower, even when unit costs are higher.)And strong clean energy policies everywhere are likely to take the demand pressure off oil prices permanently.We need to take a long-term planning perspective. The more effective we are at transitioning to a clean energy economy, the less vulnerable we will be to the next uptick in oil prices (or gas prices). And the more competitive our economy will be, and the more healthy and safe our communities, clean water and clean air will be now and in future generations when that happens.Those who think that price is more influential than I do should be supporting a pollution fee on oil (and other polluting energy forms).The risk to lower oil prices is if we get complacent and lazy. If we slack off on policies to reduce automobile efficiency/carbon pollution reduction or on encouraging smart growth, if we start to think that renewable energy is not so important, then low oil prices will have been a snare, not a benefit. The risks of low pricesThe risk of low prices is that they will divert people’s attention from the policies needed to improve our air and climate: policies that require continually improving fuel economy as well as cleaner fuels in cars and other vehicles, that provide incentives for clean vehicles that surpass the minimum requirements, and that promote compact, walkable, communities that require less driving.As demonstrated in California, such a package of policies can benefit all drivers (and also households that do not drive cars) by lowering fuel bills and reducing vulnerability to future price shocks. Aggressive clean energy policies will not only lower overall fuel bills by increasing fuel economy and reducing the need to drive, they may also allow oil prices to stay low indefinitely, helping to ensure that major new oil projects never come to market.Another risk to avoid is the prospect that energy companies may try to invest in dirty energy even when an objective analysis would say that it makes no business sense. Investors can be overly bullish on future oil prices, which is one of the reasons for the bust part of the boom-and-bust cycle in fuels. This is why advocacy against environmentally irresponsible projects is as necessary now as it was when oil prices were higher. Some of my earliest projects at NRDC were stopping power plant projects that would have turned out to be white elephants.The Paris climate agreement and other climate protection policies are also important in discouraging uneconomic investments in dirty energy: financial analysts are now cautioning against oil and coal infrastructure investments because of climate commitments. Low oil prices do not affect most renewable energy sourcesRenewable resources are mainly used in the electricity system, and electricity prices are almost entirely independent of oil prices. Oil is largely missing from the list of power generation fuels in the U.S. Renewables compete against gas and coal, and the prices of these fuels are only minimally affected by oil prices.Oil and natural gas prices fluctuate dramatically, especially over 5- or 10-year time frames. We have, notwithstanding this, successfully produced large investments in both efficiency and in renewable energy sources in times of low prices as well as high prices. We have done this through policies such as financial incentives for clean energy investment, by reformed regulatory policies that allow utilities to profit from clean energy, by regulations on product efficiency and renewables portfolio standards and low carbon fuel standards, by reductions in regulations that prevent developers from building smart-growth neighborhoods or that require parking spaces that they do not want to build, and by providing transparency on the energy costs of cars, buildings, and appliances.States and countries that have more consistently adopted and maintained these policies have much lower carbon footprints (and lower energy bills) than those that have not. They also tend to have more robust economies. David Goldstein is energy program co-director for the National Resources Defense Council in San Francisco. This post was originally published at NRDC Switchboard. Next time, a look at how low oil prices affect efficiency, consumption, and climate emissions.last_img read more

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The Minimum Effective Amount of Preparation to Prospect

first_imgYou need to be prepared to prospect. But not as much as you might think.The first thing you need to know to begin prospecting is your company’s value proposition.What problems does your company solve?How do you solve those problems?What are the three or four main differentiators that allow you to make a difference and that compel your client to choose you over your competitors?When you can answer these questions, you know enough about your company to begin prospecting.The second thing you need to know is who your target clients are, your dream clients.You need a list of dream clients (Here is a video to help you define dream clients). These people or companies are plagued with the kind of problems you solve and will perceive the value in what you sell.It’s also helpful to know the titles and roles of the people who are going to be most compelled by what you sell, but it isn’t absolutely necessary. You can find the contact you need.You don’t need a CIA dossier on your contact before you contact them. You know enough to call.The third thing you need is a good script (or planned dialogue) that allows you to ask for a meeting while promising to create value for your prospect.You need two or three useful insights or ideas that you can share with your dream client so that you can ask for a meeting. This is the value you promise to create (which means your meeting isn’t a pitch meeting).You also need a list of reasons why people refuse an appointment and good methodology for overcoming objections.A List of Things You Don’t NeedExcept in the rarest of cases, you don’t need to do hours and hours of research (even though you may need to do more research later, once you’ve booked a call). A look at the company’s website and the contact’s LinkedIn page is smart, but hours of research is call reluctance.You don’t need a trigger event. You don’t need to wait until something is reported in a public source before you call. You want to be there before the trigger event occurs. You want to nurture relationships. When the trigger event occurs, you are already behind where you need to be.You don’t need to connect on social sites, and you don’t need to listen. It’s wonderful if you connect with a contact before you pick up the phone and call them. It’s even more wonderful if you can pick up some insight that allows you to create value. The telephone is an awesome social tool because it allows you to actually speak with your prospective client across long distances.There is no formula for success that includes waiting to take action. There is no benefit in doing more than the minimum amount of preparation necessary before prospecting. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Sergio Ramos named as world’s best defender

first_imgGoal 50 Sergio Ramos named as world’s best defender of 2017 Mark Doyle Deputy Features Editor Last updated 1 year ago 15:00 11/14/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(45) Sergio Ramos Real Madrid Getty Images Goal 50 Real Madrid Sergio Ramos UEFA Champions League Primera División The prolific centre-back has been recognised for becoming the first man to lead Real Madrid to a league and European Cup double since 1958 Real Madrid and Spain star Sergio Ramos is the highest-ranked defender in the 2017 Goal 50.The 31-year-old is coming off the back of another outstanding season, having become the first player to lead Los Blancos to a league and European Cup double since Juan Alonso in 1958.Spain 7/1 to win World Cup Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Ramos contributed an impressive 10 goals to the Madrid cause – a new personal best for the centre-half over the course of a single campaign.There was a precious equaliser in the 1-1 Liga draw at Barcelona that preserved his side’s unbeaten run, which ultimately stretched to 40 matches, as well as a dramatic late winner against Real Betis during the title run-in.Sergio Ramos Real MadridRamos also drew Madrid level at a time when they were 1-0 down on the night – but still 3-2 up on aggregate – in their Champions League last-16 tie with Napoli.As a result of his decisiveness at both ends of the field, the World Cup winner finished above fellow defenders such as Leonardo Bonucci and Dani Alves in this year’s Goal 50.But where exactly did Ramos finish? Find out when the full Goal 50 list is published at 1200 UK time on Tuesday!The Goal 50 is an annual award that both recognises and ranks the world’s 50 best footballers of the past 12 months. Chief editors and correspondents from Goal’s 37 editions around the world all cast their votes, with candidates judged on their level of consistency over the previous year of action, their big-game performances, footballing legacy and the success of their teams at both club and international level.last_img read more

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9 months agoEx-Chelsea midfielder Cesc: Henry and I will take Monaco forward together

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Ex-Chelsea midfielder Cesc: Henry and I will take Monaco forward togetherby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Chelsea midfielder Cesc Fabregas says he’s joined AS Monaco to help the club’s young players.Cesc is in line to make his debut tonight against Marseille.He said, “It’s a great pleasure to join the Monaco, it’s a new project for me with a team of young players and a new coach, there was a lot of discussion, obviously I spoke with Thierry Henry, he really wanted me to come and make a difference, now I’m here and we’ll take this challenge together.”I think my experience can help the young players to grow and progress to the highest level, I am a patient player with them because I was in their place. “This group has a huge potential, so I can help them and if we can win something together even this year, it would be perfect, I am now part of the team and I cannot wait to start. We’re currently in a delicate situation, but we all want to improve, we’ll do everything to change things quickly.” last_img read more

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9 days agoEverton could lose Djibril Sidibe to AC Milan

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Everton could lose Djibril Sidibe to AC Milanby Paul Vegas9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton could lose Djibril Sidibe back to parent club AS Monaco in January.The Frenchman is currently on a season-long loan at Goodison Park, but is reportedly attracting interest from AC Milan.Fox Sports Italia says if Milan place a substantial bid for the defender this winter then Monaco would look to recall Sidibe so they call sell him to the Serie A giants.Sidibe is set to start against West Ham this weekend in place of the suspended Seamus Coleman. last_img read more

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Jon Bon Jovi To Rock Food Bank For New York City CanDo

first_imgJon Bon Jovi will give a special musical performance at Food Bank For New York City’s Can-Do Awards on April 30.Being honored for their commitment to hunger-relief are Mario Batali, Diane Sawyer, Susan Cahn and the ABC News Hidden America Team.Expected to attend are Michael Stipe, Rachael Ray, David Burke, Anne Burrell, Cesare Casella, Jill Hennessy, Emeril LaGasse, Geoffrey Zakarian, Tom Collicchio, Josh Charles, Gail Simmons, Dominic Fumusa, Kelly Bensimon, Selita Ebanks, Cat Greenleaf and Michael Schlow.The Can Do Awards Dinner is the premier Food Bank For New York City event that helps support the nearly 2.6 million New Yorkers who are struggling to put food on the table. Highlights of the evening include a cocktail reception beginning at 6 p.m. followed by dinner, live auction, awards presentation, and a musical performance.Highlights of the evening include a cocktail reception followed by a sit down dinner, awards presentations, live auction & musical performance by Jon Bon Jovi.WHERE: Cipriani Wall Street55 Wall Street, NYCWHEN: Tuesday, April 30th, 2013For more info, or to buy tickets, visit the event pagelast_img read more

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Sharon Lawrence Joins Advisory Board Of Adrienne Shelly Foundation

first_imgThe Adrienne Shelly Foundation (ASF), a non-profit organization named after the late actor and filmmaker Adrienne Shelly who was killed in 2006, announced today its appointment of Cliff Chenfeld and Jon Harris to its Board of Directors, and the addition of Sharon Lawrence to its Advisory Board.Chenfeld is the Co-CEO of Razor & Tie, an independent music company, and Kidz Bop, a kids’ music, marketing and digital platform. He has also served as executive producer of a number of movies including the comedy Serious Moonlight, written by Ms. Shelly, and Concussion, which premiered at Sundance in 2013.Harris is senior vice president of global communications at the Hillshire Brands Company, a newly public $4 billion consumer food products leader. An active philanthropist, he serves on the boards of Common Threads, Gilda’s Club-Cancer Concern, The Lookingglass Theatre Company and Athletes Against Drugs.Lawrence is a four-time Emmy nominated and SAG Award winning actress who’s starred in NYPD Blue, Desperate Housewives, Monk, Law and Order: SVU, Grey’s Anatomy and currently stars in Lifetime’s Drop Dead Diva and TNT’s Rizzoli & Isles. She’s also appeared in the films Wasted Grace, Middle of Nowhere, Solace and The After, Chris Carter’s new thriller for Amazon Studios, which premieres later this year.
Formed in January 2007, the Adrienne Shelly Foundation supports the artistic achievements of female filmmakers through a series of grants distributed through partnerships with Women in Film, IFP, Nantucket Film Festival, Sundance Institute, Tribeca Film Institute, Columbia University, Boston University, Rooftop Films and American Film Institute. Since its inception, it has awarded forty-eighty grants. For more information, please visit www.adrienneshellyfoundation.org.last_img read more

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Cardale Jones looks to keep Ohio State on track against Minnesota

OSU redshirt junior quarterback Cardale Jones (12) runs with the ball during a game against Rutgers on Oct. 24 at High Point Solutions Stadium in Piscataway Township, NJ . OSU won 49-7. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorWith the one-game suspension of Ohio State redshirt sophomore quarterback J.T. Barrett following a Saturday morning drunk-driving citation, the door has opened for redshirt junior Cardale Jones to come off the bench and lead the offense.It is a situation the Cleveland native is more than familiar with after filling in for the final three games of last season, but not likely one he expected just one game after losing his starting job for the first time.Still, OSU coach Urban Meyer said he has complete faith in Jones.“Cardale had a great week of practice last week, he’s engaged, he handled everything like a man,” Meyer said. “He threw for 300 yards a couple weeks ago at a 75 percent clip. He’s 10-0 as a starter. That’s not even a hesitation.”Despite Meyer’s confidence in Jones, senior left tackle Taylor Decker said the absence of Barrett could affect the offense for OSU (8-0, 4-0) that was improving each game.“I think it does affect our momentum,” Decker said. “We were getting J.T. in there more and more and we were improving week to week, but at the same time I don’t think it was just J.T. getting in there that affected our momentum. I think everyone was playing better.”That start for Jones is set to come on Saturday against visiting Minnesota (4-4, 1-3).OSU has won eight consecutive meetings with the Golden Gophers, but Decker said OSU expects a very tough matchup with the road team, which is led by the 25th ranked defense in the country.“It could be one of the toughest games for us thus far this year,” Decker said.If something were to happen to Jones on Saturday, Meyer said another former starting quarterback would step in: redshirt senior Braxton Miller.Miller, a two-time Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year, started at quarterback for the Buckeyes for three seasons before a shoulder injury and the emergences of Barrett and Jones forced him to switch positions to H-back.The Huber Heights, Ohio, native is yet to throw a downfield pass this season, but Meyer said the decision to slot him as the backup over redshirt freshman Stephen Collier was an easy one.“There’s no question that he’s our No. 2 quarterback,” Meyer said.Meyer said no decision had been made as of Monday as to if Miller would be behind center in the red zone, as Barrett did for the final two weeks of Jones’ original stint as the starter.Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. at Ohio Stadium.About the GophersMinnesota’s season has been marked by several strong performances and several duds.The Golden Gophers put scares in No. 8 TCU in the season opener and, last week, No. 17 Michigan, losing by six and three points, respectively.However, a trio of three-point wins over the Mountain West’s Colorado State and the Mid-American Conference’s Kent State and Ohio showed that Minnesota has oftentimes looked better in losses than wins this season.Minnesota’s interim coach, Tracy Claeys, is set to lead his team for the second consecutive game after stepping in following the sudden retirement of former coach Jerry Kill.The players rallied around Claeys in his first game, coming within a yard of upsetting Michigan. Meyer said he expects that same passion on the road in Columbus.“I think that they played their best game (against Michigan),” Meyer said. “They were very inspired, they played tremendous in that game on both sides of the ball against a very good team. So, I think they’re an excellent team. They’re hitting their stride right now as well.”A season ago, Minnesota put up a fight against the Buckeyes in Minneapolis, though OSU came away with a 31-24 victory. Barrett was responsible for 389 yards and four touchdowns in the game.That contest marked the last time OSU junior running back Ezekiel Elliott failed to rush for over 100 yards, as he finished with 91. The St. Louis native has eclipsed the century mark in 13 consecutive games since. Webb is backDuring Tuesday’s Big Ten coaches teleconference, Meyer revealed that sophomore cornerback Damon Webb’s suspension has been lifted and he could return to action on Saturday.Webb played in each of OSU’s first two games, picking up eight tackles, before being suspended for an undisclosed violation of a team policy before the Buckeyes’ Week 3 game against Northern Illinois.Webb’s return comes as a necessity for an OSU secondary that has lost junior safety Cam Burrows and, as Meyer also announced on Tuesday, sophomore safety Erick Smith for the season.Webb did not appear on OSU’s weekly depth chart, but Meyer indicated during the teleconference that he will see the field against the Golden Gophers.Meyer also said on Monday that junior H-back Dontre Wilson and redshirt freshman receiver Parris Campbell are questionable on Saturday, while redshirt freshman receiver Johnnie Dixon is out following a knee injury.Up nextAfter the matchup with Minnesota, OSU is scheduled to head to Champaign, Illinois, for a meeting with the Fighting Illini. Kickoff is slated for either noon or 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 14. read more

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Scotts helping hand sparks newlook Buckeyes

Senior guard Shannon Scott (3) dribbles the ball during a game against Marquette on Nov. 18 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 74-63.Credit: Muyao Shen / Lantern photographerIn the first two games of the 2013-14 season, the Ohio State men’s basketball team tallied 27 assists.Through two games this season, Shannon Scott has 25.The No. 20 Buckeyes — playing without their top three scorers from last season — are 2-0 and shooting 63.3 percent from the field in those two games.After OSU’s 74-63 win against Marquette on Tuesday, Scott — who had 14 of the team’s 23 assists in the game — said his teammates have a different offensive mindset than they did a year ago.“I think last year, we would play the same way at times, but players didn’t know if they wanted to shoot the ball or not,” Scott said. “I think this year everybody knows that when they touch the ball, it’s gonna be their shot, and they gotta make the shot.”Against the Golden Eagles, making the shot is exactly what the Buckeyes did, and what they have done consistently through 80 minutes of basketball this year. With five new players contributing to the scoring output, the shooting — and making — has come on the shoulders of a variety of players.Including a true freshman, a redshirt-freshman and a redshirt-senior playing in their first seasons at OSU, six different Buckeyes have scored in double figures at some point this season. Four of those six players have averaged double digits through two games, and two of those four didn’t take the court last season.The distribution of scoring has led to all 10 OSU players who have taken the court this season scoring on both games.With senior forward Sam Thompson, senior centers Amir Williams and Trey McDonald, redshirt-senior forward Anthony Lee, sophomore forward Marc Loving, redshirt-freshman guard Kam Williams, freshman guard D’Angelo Russell, freshman forwards Keita Bates-Diop and Jae’Sean Tate and himself all contributing points, Scott said the Buckeyes already have a good idea of how they each fit into the team dynamic.“Just the simple fact that everybody came in and contributed in some aspect of the game is just a great feeling,” Scott said Tuesday. “And I think everybody has a better understanding of what their role is.”The wide range of contribution has helped Scott excel as a distributor, as he picked up 11 assists in the opener against the University of Massachusetts-Lowell last Friday before his 14 helpers against Marquette.Those 14 assists are tied for the second most in a single game in school history, but Scott attributed the big numbers to his teammates and not his own play.“I just have so many weapons around me, it makes the game a lot easier,” he said. “Kam came into the game, played great. Amir played well.“Sam, Marc, D’Angelo, Jae’Sean, Kam, Keita, Trey, Anthony, everybody played well. So having so many weapons around me, it makes the game a lot easier for me.”After the Buckeyes’ hot hand from 3-point land carried them to a seven-point halftime lead against the Golden Eagles, they moved inside and scored 32 points in the paint in the second half. Coach Thad Matta credited Scott’s ability to push the team for the second-half switch on offense.“I think Shannon was able to open things up a little bit and obviously Sam running in transition,” Matta said after the game. “I think our bigs are really doing a good job of getting down the floor as well which opens things up.”Scott said the team’s mindset has changed from a year ago, allowing for the more free-flowing offense OSU has run so far this season.“I think everybody just has the mindset this year that we’re not gonna take any plays off on the offensive end,” he said. “We played so hard on defense the last couple years that we kind of forgot about offense.”Perhaps contributing to his recent success passing the ball, Scott added that the Buckeyes have more of a plan on offense than they did last year as well.“This year we know when we get the ball we’re gonna attack every time,” Scott said. “You can ask Kam and Amir the same thing, we’re all attacking every time we touch the ball, and that makes it a lot easier for all of us.”Apart from the new-look offense, Amir Williams said the Buckeyes have benefited from a change to their defensive philosophy as well after switching to a zone look.“We have so much length and quickness on defense,” he said after the Marquette game. “It allows us to attack our opponents better than last year. We have guys doing a great job of covering the gaps, and we’re definitely still working out the kinks, but so far it’s been working very well for us.”As the team transitions its mindset on both sides of the ball, Scott has helped lead a high-flying young roster to a fresh start to begin a potential-laden season. But with the rest of the year an unknown, one thing is for sure. If Lee had flown just a little higher on one dunk attempt, Scott would have made his mark in the records books, and not just on recent box scores.Amir Williams and Kam Williams combined to let out a long “oooh” when they found out Scott was just a Lee-missed-dunk away from tying former Buckeye Aaron Craft’s program record of 15 assists, but the fourth-year veteran took it in stride, and instead looked ahead to another chance.“It’s OK, we’ll just try to get it again, another game or something,” Scott said.OSU is scheduled to return to the court on Sunday against Sacred Heart at the Schottenstein Center. 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