H View’s Bernard gives up semi-final chase in Red Stripe Premier League

first_imgThree weeks ago, Harbour View were in pole position to secure the last remaining Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL)semi-final spot, even though they only led UWI on goaldifference.However, three matches later following two draws and a loss the Stars of the East have sunk two places down the table to sixth, five points adrift of fourth place UWI (45) and four behind fifth place Humble Lion with two matches to go.One of those rounds will be played today, with Harbour View hosting Arnett Gardens at Harbour View Stadium.Following the team’s 1-1 draw with Reno at home on Sunday, Harbour View’s head coach Ludlow Bernard is willing to accept that the team will not make the last four thisseason.”We as the coaches will have to look into ourselves, do some introspection and find out if we were going about the business in a manner that could really get them over the hump. So we will have to review our position and take it from there,” he told The Gleaner.”But at the same time players have to be accountable. I am never going to complain about the content or quality of the squad because I believe the quality was good enough for us to execute on each day.”But at the same time, there seems to be a lack of desire and attitude, and it was very exemplary today (Sunday) with that opportunity Ranique Muir got at the back post, when he chose to simply tapped home when he should have really rammed home the advantage in a very decisive way and I think that speaks to the type of attitude that our players have, so it is a two-way street,” he reasoned.Harbour View controlled the first-half against Reno and went ahead through Muir after 17 minutes. The hosts then wasted great chances to extend their lead through Muir, Evan Taylor and Mark English.However, Reno found an equaliser in the 79th minute through Renario Downswell and then came inches to taking the three points twice at the death.”Clearly it wasn’t the result we planned for all week,” Bernard commented. “It’s very disappointing with what transpired here this evening (Sunday).”We were in control and should have come away with all three points as we got some very good one v one with the goalkeeper and failed to capitalise and as usual you pay the price for those instances.”Also, probably we were a little slack at the back and that caused us to concede the goal, so I think it’s lights out for us. It is going to be highly improbable for us to get back (in semi-final race) and I am willing to concede at this moment,” he stated.Today’s matchesBoys’ Town vs Tivoli Gardens at Barbican StadiumHarbour View vs Arnett Gardens at Harbour View StadiumHumble Lion vs Cavalier at Effortville Community CentrePortmore United vs UWI FC at Juici Park, ClarendonRivoli United vs MoBay United at Spanish Town Prison OvalWaterhouse vs FC Reno at DrewslandAll matches start at 3:30 p.m.last_img read more

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Evolution Is Not Just Change or Similarity

first_img(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Many scientific findings get labeled with “evolution” even though neo-Darwinism has nothing to do with them.Reversible evolution:  A study on dust mites reported by Science Daily claims evolution can run backwards to previous states – a violation of an evolutionary principle called Dollo’s Law.  For one, the supposed phylogenetic analysis began and ended with dust mites, not with one kind of creature turning into another.  For another, a violation of Dollo’s Law (“evolution is unidirectional and irreversible”) amounts to a falsification of neo-Darwinism, not a confirmation of it.Predictable evolution:  An article on PhysOrg and another on Science Daily claim long-term evolution is “surprisingly predictable,” contrary to a key tenet of neo-Darwinism that evolution is aimless and purposeless.  The first study involved just a computer model of a particular protein connection, irrelevant to evolution anyway.  The second began and ended with E. coli (one species), of doubtful relevance to the issue of Darwinian “origin of species.”Gambler evolution:  Can studies of living gamblers provide any insight into human evolution?  Science Daily thought so (“It’s in the Cards: Human Evolution Influences Gamblers’ Decisions“), but the big question left begging is whether humans’ ability to make “rational decisions” is a product of neo-Darwinism.  If they think so, they have refuted their own thesis: the scientists’ own decision to study rationality is undermined by an aimless, purposeless process, leading a critic to question whether their own rationality is rational.Swallow evolution:  Several science sites, like Nature News, toyed with the idea that swallows are evolving to dodge traffic.  This is based on findings that fewer swallows are winding up as roadkill.  This again, though, even if the statistics are legitimate, does nothing to confirm neo-Darwinism.  It does not find that a mutation has created an innovation.  It might just mean that the clumsiest birds have already died.  The remainder are all still members of the same species.Cicada evolution:  An open-access paper on PNAS struggled to understand the evolutionary dynamics of periodic cicadas.  Often, those with 13-year cycles coexist with others on 17-year cycles.  That fact alone refutes the neo-Darwinian position that fitter species displace others.  Moreover, they’re all cicadas, members of the same genus Magicicada.  Even strict creationists allow for that amount of variation within created kinds.  The ending part of the paper’s Discussion section included a mixture of hubris and humility: “Our results support the idea that life cycle plasticity has been a creative force in the evolution of Magicicada,” they said.  “However, the regulatory system of Magicicada life cycles and the mechanism of putative life cycle shift are completely unknown and require future comparative genomic studies of 13- and 17-y periodical cicadas.”  What, exactly, was known?Survival of the fattest:  An article on Science Daily about polar bears appears to be about evolution, but really is just about challenges polar bears face with sea ice changes.   Any reporter touting “survival of the fattest,” needless to say, is stretching the idea of “fitness” far astray from what Darwin envisioned.From frog to Beatle:  Any connection between the little hairs on frog toes and human locks of hair seems a stretch.  Nature News, though, claimed that there’s an evolutionary relationship: “Frog feet share human hair origin.”  Surely they did not mean to imply that frog hair evolved from Beatle moptops.  Because of similarity in the genes for keratin between the distant species, researchers advanced this leap of faith: “The authors say that these proteins must have arisen in an early tetrapod ancestor before diverging to become hair in mammals and toe pads in frogs.”  Exactly how a suite of complex proteins “arose” was left unexplained.In each of these crazy articles, evolution was assumed, not demonstrated.  “Evolution” has become such a flexible term, it means nothing any more.  Darwin tried to link progress from molecules to man to a mechanism that produced innovation without a designer, but where is it?  These stories are all nonsensical in that context.  Whatever is observed, evolved.  Whatever exists, emerged.  That’s the new rule, no matter how contrary to expectations, no matter how trivial the change, no matter how illogical.  Even strong evidence for design is twisted into supposed evidence for evolution.  Evolutionists have succeeded in committing the perfect crime, the ultimate scam.  It’s time to unmask these charlatans.  Send them back to basics.  They have completely lost their way as to what science is and what it’s supposed to be.  Sadly, their way is leading millions astray.  They need a healthy dose of shame.last_img read more

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SA, Japan sign science agreement

first_img2 September 2003South Africa and Japan have signed a memorandum of understanding to cooperate in the areas of science and technology.The agreement was signed in Pretoria last week as part of the sixth session of the South Africa-Japan Partnership Forum.President Thabo Mbeki proposed the partnership in science and technology during his visit to Japan in October 2001.Speaking at the signing ceremony, Arts, Culture, Science and Technology Minister Ben Ngubane said the agreement was based on the need to increase the number of women and people from previously disadvantaged communities entering the fields of science and technology.“The priority area in the agreement includes increasing the presence of new science missions in the two countries”, Ngubane said.Yasukuni Enoki, the Japanese ambassador, said the agreement was the beginning of a long relationship between the two countries. “We look forward to learning more from South Africa”, he said.The agreement also covers cooperation in biotechnology, information and communication technology, rural development, and environmental management technologies, which will be facilitated through exchange programmes of scientists from the two countries.The two-day South Africa-Japan Partnership Forum, attended by Japanese Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Tetsuro Yano, also discussed the interaction between the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad) and the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD).Japan is South Africa’s most important trade partner in Asia, and the third most important in the world. Imports from Japan totalled over R19-billion in 2002, while SA exports to Japan totalled over R24-billion.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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How Low Oil Prices Can Be Good for the Environment

first_imgOver the past year and a half, oil prices have declined from over $100 a barrel to less than $35 a barrel. Should environmentalists be worried that this will cause people to turn away from clean energy and fail to meet climate pollution goals?In my judgment, no. On balance, the break from high oil prices can be good for the environment. I believe we should celebrate our good fortune if we are entering a period of lower energy prices. But we must make sure that we do not squander the benefits by weakening our resolve to transition to efficiency and clean energy supply. We must instead expand our efforts to provide a suite of carrots and sticks, new regulations in some areas and reduced regulation in others, to encourage more efficient transportation systems, which account for the lion’s share of oil use.Low prices do not mean that oil is “cheap,” since the true costs of oil include the damage to our health, to the world’s climate, to American national security, to economic stability, and to the environments where oil drilling takes place. These costs are usually invisible to the consumer. But they are real, and they represent an irresponsible if unintended policy to shift costs from producers and consumers of oil to the general public. RELATED ARTICLES Low oil prices can deter some of the dirtiest energyMany of the dirtiest oil resources are expensive. They only make sense when oil prices are high. If oil prices remain low, it should help discourage new investments in high-cost oil extraction, such as in the Arctic and the Canadian tar sands. And it will also reduce fracking and tight oil (“shale oil”) production projects.At current oil prices, infrastructure projects like the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline stop being viable investments. However, at prices only slightly below $70 a barrel, pipeline projects like Keystone XL become even more of a threat to the environment: they would enable economically marginal tar sands projects that otherwise would not be economical to move forward by providing cheap transportation capacity. This is a reason why stopping this project when we did was so important. But at current prices, neither tar sands nor the pipeline pencil out.Stopping tar sands production is a big win for the environment because the tar sands have a higher carbon footprint than other sources of oil, and because production is especially damaging to the local environment. Some of the other projects impacted by low oil prices produce, as a by-product, natural gas that oil and gas producers choose not to transport to market today — primarily due to the economics of building new pipelines compared to current low gas prices — and so it is flared at the well, producing extra carbon pollution.Already, major oil companies are announcing the cancellation of environmentally damaging drilling projects, and I anticipate more to come.Low oil prices do not stop oil drilling — all of which is environmentally damaging to a greater or lesser extent. Drilling, fracking, and ongoing production have adverse effects on health, the local economy, the livability of a community, or the local ecology. Some areas can be drilled at a low price, and still require careful regulation to prevent or minimize impacts.Environmentalists cannot slacken in our vigilance to stop inappropriate oil production schemes.Just because a project becomes uneconomic does not mean it will necessarily be cancelled: sometimes oil companies are more interested in winning than in profits, or in cross-subsidizing operations to lock in leases for down the road when they expect prices to rise again. Also, oil service companies make money on drilling regardless of whether the project they are constructing does. So some inappropriate projects may go forward unless they are stopped by policy. Some of these invisible costs are saved as low oil prices make some of the worst projects financially infeasible, and reduce the flow of money to regimes that promote global instability.Today’s low oil prices, and the market expectation that they will remain low for almost a decade — futures markets expect them not to recover to even $60 as far out as these markets go, which is 2024 — will cause many oil production plans to be canceled, which is a good thing from an environmental perspective. (I expect that oil prices will not remain low that long unless we can deploy clean energy strategies faster than we are doing now, which I will discuss later, and others agree.) Here is a link to Part 2 of Goldstein’s blog series: The Effect of Low Oil Prices on Climate Emissions. High prices do not promote efficiencyThe bulk of clean energy resources are energy efficiency, and all the evidence I have seen shows that efficiency is only minimally affected by price. Behavior — such as driving more — is affected by price, but the size of this effect is small. This issue is discussed in detail in the accompanying blog..What if you are not convinced that low prices have such a benign (if still directionally bad) influence on oil consumption?Then you should be supporting a pollution fee. A pollution fee could restore oil prices to consumers to a level that you feel is appropriate. Perhaps that means the level that they were at before the decrease: about $110-120 a barrel. If $110-120 a barrel for the consumer is an appropriate price for oil, we should charge producers a fee of somewhere about $80 a barrel. Notwithstanding the arguments I make here, I think that such a fee is a good idea. It is fair, in that it makes those who benefit from oil consumption compensate those who are hurt by it. And even if it doesn’t have a large effect on consumption it still moves the nation in the right direction.And think of what it could do to the federal government deficit! An $80 a barrel fee would eliminate the deficit. (The Energy Information Administration finds that the United States consumed 6.97 billion barrels of oil in 2014. Thus a fee of $80 a barrel would generate about $550 billion a year. In comparison, for FY2015 and FY2016 the deficit is about $450 billion each year.)Note that I am not arguing that the correct amount of the fee is $80 a barrel. Lower amounts may make more sense. Nor am I arguing that deficit reduction is the best use of the money: investments in clean energy transportation alternatives would be far better for both the economy and the environment. But if you think low oil prices are a problem, you ought to be proposing a solution rather than sitting in a corner wringing your hands.But a fee would address both the supply-side and the demand-side environmental issues by encouraging conservation and discouraging production. The Effect of Low Oil Prices on Climate Emissions Green Building in the Cheap Energy EraEnergy Predictions for 2012Designing for the FutureU.S. Wind Energy Prices Hit an All-Time LowThe End of Peak Oil?PV Systems Have Gotten Dirt CheapThe Big Allure of Cheap PVcenter_img Profiting from today’s lower oil pricesLower prices for oil and for gasoline save consumers money, and this is good for the economy in the short term. We celebrate these consumer and business savings. Amory Lovins has noted that energy price is a race between efficiency and depletion (actually a race between efficiency plus renewables and depletion). We rejoice that the market in 2016 is telling us that clean energy is pulling ahead.But we do so with the memory that price cuts (or spikes) are not permanent. At some point, perhaps next year, more likely in 5 years, and possibly not for 10 years, oil prices may go up again. We want to approach that time prepared, with a drastically reduced dependence on volatile-priced fossil fuels. Indeed, this reduced dependence may prevent prices from ever going up much.Yes, I noted above that futures markets expect oil to remain well below $60 for ten years. But we’ve seen this movie before — especially in the early 1980s and the late 1990s. Futures markets are thin and volatile, and often fail dramatically to predict the future. In particular, oil futures markets predict that today’s lower prices will fade away. Such predictions may encourage producers to hang on when they should be shutting down, and thus become self-defeating, because they result in overproduction and reductions in price when markets are expecting small increases.While lower oil prices may help the economy in the short term, in the long term the states and countries with strong policies supporting clean energy do better economically than those that are less active, and spend less on energy even in those cases when energy prices are higher. (They spend less because diminished consumption due to efficiency means bills are lower, even when unit costs are higher.)And strong clean energy policies everywhere are likely to take the demand pressure off oil prices permanently.We need to take a long-term planning perspective. The more effective we are at transitioning to a clean energy economy, the less vulnerable we will be to the next uptick in oil prices (or gas prices). And the more competitive our economy will be, and the more healthy and safe our communities, clean water and clean air will be now and in future generations when that happens.Those who think that price is more influential than I do should be supporting a pollution fee on oil (and other polluting energy forms).The risk to lower oil prices is if we get complacent and lazy. If we slack off on policies to reduce automobile efficiency/carbon pollution reduction or on encouraging smart growth, if we start to think that renewable energy is not so important, then low oil prices will have been a snare, not a benefit. The risks of low pricesThe risk of low prices is that they will divert people’s attention from the policies needed to improve our air and climate: policies that require continually improving fuel economy as well as cleaner fuels in cars and other vehicles, that provide incentives for clean vehicles that surpass the minimum requirements, and that promote compact, walkable, communities that require less driving.As demonstrated in California, such a package of policies can benefit all drivers (and also households that do not drive cars) by lowering fuel bills and reducing vulnerability to future price shocks. Aggressive clean energy policies will not only lower overall fuel bills by increasing fuel economy and reducing the need to drive, they may also allow oil prices to stay low indefinitely, helping to ensure that major new oil projects never come to market.Another risk to avoid is the prospect that energy companies may try to invest in dirty energy even when an objective analysis would say that it makes no business sense. Investors can be overly bullish on future oil prices, which is one of the reasons for the bust part of the boom-and-bust cycle in fuels. This is why advocacy against environmentally irresponsible projects is as necessary now as it was when oil prices were higher. Some of my earliest projects at NRDC were stopping power plant projects that would have turned out to be white elephants.The Paris climate agreement and other climate protection policies are also important in discouraging uneconomic investments in dirty energy: financial analysts are now cautioning against oil and coal infrastructure investments because of climate commitments. Low oil prices do not affect most renewable energy sourcesRenewable resources are mainly used in the electricity system, and electricity prices are almost entirely independent of oil prices. Oil is largely missing from the list of power generation fuels in the U.S. Renewables compete against gas and coal, and the prices of these fuels are only minimally affected by oil prices.Oil and natural gas prices fluctuate dramatically, especially over 5- or 10-year time frames. We have, notwithstanding this, successfully produced large investments in both efficiency and in renewable energy sources in times of low prices as well as high prices. We have done this through policies such as financial incentives for clean energy investment, by reformed regulatory policies that allow utilities to profit from clean energy, by regulations on product efficiency and renewables portfolio standards and low carbon fuel standards, by reductions in regulations that prevent developers from building smart-growth neighborhoods or that require parking spaces that they do not want to build, and by providing transparency on the energy costs of cars, buildings, and appliances.States and countries that have more consistently adopted and maintained these policies have much lower carbon footprints (and lower energy bills) than those that have not. They also tend to have more robust economies. David Goldstein is energy program co-director for the National Resources Defense Council in San Francisco. This post was originally published at NRDC Switchboard. Next time, a look at how low oil prices affect efficiency, consumption, and climate emissions.last_img read more

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Researchers Test a New Type of Insulation

first_imgResearchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have helped develop a type of building insulation that combines vacuum panel cores and rigid foam. The new composite boards have double the thermal performance per inch of insulation now on the market. In an announcement, ORNL said that the modified atmosphere insulation (MAI) composite had resistance to heat flow “at least twice that of current building insulation materials made of plastic foams, cellulose or fiberglass.” “We’ve proven that MAI-based composites are technically viable options for buildings, providing higher performance than current insulations,” study co-author Kaushik Biswas said in a prepared statement.RELATED ARTICLESInsulation ChoicesChoosing Rigid FoamDoes Vacuum Insulation Make Sense? The results of their study were published in the journal Applied Energy. (A short summary of their findings can be viewed online for free, but the full article is behind a paywall.) Vacuum insulated panels (VIPs) are an established technology, but their use is limited. VIPs are much better insulators than conventional products, but they are expensive, can’t be modified in the field, and may show a loss of performance over time as the vacuum seal gradually degrades. For those reasons, VIPs are a specialty product useful in some situations but not as a replacement for conventional types of building insulation. The MAI composite boards were created in a semi-automatic operation and were much simpler to make than traditional vacuum insulation panels, lowering costs to within reach for some retrofit applications, according to researchers who worked on the project. Real world testing is underway In a telephone call, project manager André Desjarlais said Oak Ridge collaborated with two manufacturers — Firestone and NanoPore — to develop panels that combine fumed silica, barrier materials borrowed from the food industry, and polyisocyanurate foam board. Samples from a limited production run were installed in a low-slope rooftop in Caribou, Maine, over the summer (see the photos in the gallery above). The new insulation consists of MAI panels completely encased in polyiso. The composite has at least two advantages over the vacuum panels that have been on the market for decades: they’re much cheaper to make, and they should last for 25 years without a significant decline in R-value. A 2-inch-thick MAI/polyiso panel has an R-value of about 25, or R-12+ per inch — about twice as high as polyiso foam alone. By themselves, the sealed MAI packages have an R-value of 40 per inch. “The idea of having this encapsulated package and pulling a vacuum on it and getting a high R-value has been around for 40 years, maybe longer,” Desjarlais said. “The issue has always been one of cost.” In its early work with NanoPore, the lab learned that 80% of the cost of vacuum panels is in manufacturing. To lower the cost, researchers started with fumed silica, a common and relatively inexpensive nano material that already has broad commercial uses (it’s used to filter swimming pool water, for example). They combined that with an outer barrier material similar to what is used in the food industry to keep products fresh. “We’re basically taking a potato chip bag and filling it with dirt,” he said. “That’s what we’ve got.” The lab also worked with Firestone, a major producer of polyiso panels for the commercial roofing market. The group adapted an existing foam line and found a way to insert a dozen MAI panels inside a 4×8 sheet of foam. The facing of the foam is printed to show where the panels are located, so that if the roofing contractor wants to use mechanical fasteners to install the sheets it can be done — providing the installer is careful. In the Maine test installation, Desjarlais said, the roof was divided into thirds. In one section, installers used mechanical fasteners to put down the insulation; in another the sheets were fully adhered (no mechanical fasteners). On the last section, a double layer of polyiso was installed. So far, embedded sensors indicate that all parts of the roof are performing about the same. Desjarlais said he’d like to return to the test site with an infrared camera when it gets a little colder for a followup visit. Costs are coming down A major goal of the project was to find a way to make high-performance panels at an attractive cost. Loose-fill fiberglass costs between 3 and 5 cents per square foot per R, Desjarlais explained, while rigid foam insulation costs about 10 cents per square foot per R. “We’re about in the 20-cent range, where it used to be a buck,” he said. “We’ve made a big dent in the cost.” Although the new vacuum panels are not yet competitive with conventional building insulation, “it’s getting close.” A simulator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory used to test the performance of a new type of insulation panel. With lower costs, Desjarlais thinks the panels could have two important applications: retrofits for low-slope commercial roofs, and residential energy retrofits. Rooftops of commercial buildings are often crowded with mechanical equipment and access hatches, making it difficult if not economically impossible to add layers of conventional polyiso during an upgrade. Having R-25 panels only 2 inches thick would be a breakthrough when space is a key issue. Roofers would find the insulation very familiar. “We wanted to come up with packaging similar to what contractors see today,” Desjarlais said. “What better place to put it then right inside the foam board they’re used to handling. It looks like, it tastes like, it smells like a piece of polyiso foam. The only time you’ll know that it’s not is when you pick it up. It weights about five times more than a piece of polyiso foam.” Residential energy upgrades also are a likely target for producers. A 2-inch-thick panel applied to the outside of the house would be enough to meet current energy codes in the continental U.S., even if the house had no cavity insulation, Desjarlais said. One problem would be wall areas where standard 4×8 sheets or half sheets wouldn’t fit. Like the old vacuum panels, MAI sheets can’t be cut in the field without piercing the barrier and ruining the vacuum. The solution would be for a contractor to have standard polyiso on hand to fill in spots where the vacuum-panel sheets wouldn’t work. Better performance over time One advantage of making the cores of the vacuum panels from fumed silicate is that high R-values are possible without pulling a very “hard” vacuum, Desjarlais said. And, when plotting R-values against pressure, the curve tends to be very flat over a wide range of vacuum pressures, from 10 to 100 torr (torr is a unit of measurement for vacuums). That means the panels can afford to lose a relatively large amount of vacuum before their thermal performance fails. “We can over-evacuate it and have quite a bit of cushion in vacuum loss before we see any significant loss of R-value,” Desjarlais said. “We think we can get 25 years of service out of a panel if we evacuate to a certain level. Even if it leaks, the R-value loss is minimal.” Leaks should be less likely because the barrier material that’s used to encase the silica also is much better than what was available 25 years ago. Back then, vacuum panels relied on a two-component barrier of aluminized Mylar. Today, barrier materials are six or seven layers thick and don’t cost any more, he said. Coming to market? It’s one thing to develop a promising prototype in the lab, and another altogether to invest in manufacturing and marketing to get it to consumers. The panels appear to be working exactly as designed on a roof in Caribou, Maine, but will either NeoPore or Firestone feel good enough about its commercial prospects to bring it to market? That’s not a question Desjarlais can answer. Both firms are apparently weighing their options at the moment and have not made a decision. “I would say I’m cautiously optimistic,” Desjarlais said. GBA emailed inquiries to both companies seeking comment on how likely it was that the ORNL research would result in a commercially available product. In a reply, Firestone spokeswoman Laura McCaslin confirmed the company is working on the insulation, adding, “We can’t comment on any additional details at this time regarding commercialization or future plans for going to market as they have not been determined.” NeoPore did not respond. This post was updated on Sept. 25 to include new information from Firestone.last_img read more

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Pete’s Puzzle: Old-School Turbine Vents

first_imgI did find an “Architects Manual” for these vents on eBid but did not spring for it at $35.00. But they were clearly state-of-the-art at the turn of the last century.Should they stay or should they go?The vents are on the roof of the St. Michael’s school here in Brattleboro, Vt. and are under scrutiny as part of a roofing project to replace the existing roof membrane and add rooftop solar. Along the way, though, the architect and roofing contractor became concerned about spotty efflorescence on the brick in the parapet and a hodgepodge of cellulose and fiberglass batt insulation in the 16-inch or so space between the top floor class room ceilings and the roof deck.On the roof of St Michael’s school, there are 3 of the larger and 3 of the smaller roof ventilators. The ventilators have the exterior wind vanes but also curved vanes on the interior as well.Is the brick efflorescence from wintertime condensation in the attic? Are the vents encouraging warm, moist air to move into the attic and intensifying moisture problems?This is the east side of the St. Michael’s school building. You can see white efflorescence on the brick parapet, most pronounced just to the left of the entry bump-out.Why are there two sizes of vents (three of each) and what do each of the vents do? Are they attic vents or part of the building’s ventilation system(s)? We spent quite a bit of time tracking down each of the rooftop ventilators and their interior connections.The smaller roof ventilatorsAll three of the smaller rooftop ventilators turned out to be ducted to exhaust fans. Two of the smaller ones were ducted directly to top-floor bathroom exhaust fans. These fans were builder-grade bath fans with just barely enough flow to turn the rooftop ventilators. The third smaller rooftop vent was connected to a powerful belt-driven impeller exhaust fan that connected to the basement boys and girls locker rooms and the kitchen exhaust (controlled by a simple switch in the kitchen).In the basement custodial room, this impeller motor drives the exhaust for the kitchen and the basement’s two locker rooms.The black grille on the rectangular duct is the kitchen exhaust.In the upper right, you can see the open-ended exhaust duct for this basement locker room.When on, this exhaust vent system got the rooftop ventilator whirling bigtime (see the video above).The bigger roof ventilatorsIn each classroom, we located a grille and scuttle hole tucked up into a row of back-wall cubbies.There is a grille like this one at the back of each classroom in the school.These cubbies in the back of each classroom contain both the vent grille and the scuttle hole to access the large chase above the cubbies.By crawling up into this chase space, we tracked the ducts connected to the grilles up into the attic. One last crawl into the attic space (see hallway access photo below) confirmed that each classroom duct connected to a 3 foot by 3 foot plenum connected to each of the three larger roof ventilators.Plenum connecting to larger roof ventilators.This was a 1920s passive ventilation and cooling system, designed to have use wind and the stack effect to create fresh air flow into the classrooms. It may have worked well during the spring and fall of the school year, but not so well in the winter (when each of the grilles gets taped closed with plastic).This is the top-floor hallway scuttlehole to access the attic plenum.In the attic, you can see the large duct that connects directly to the larger rooftop ventilator. In the foreground is the original cast iron pipe for one of the two rooftop drains.We solve the school ghost mysteryIt turns out that both the project architect and roofing contractor are parents of students at the school. Their kids insist that the boys and girls locker rooms are “haunted” by screeching ghosts. And yes, while we were doing our work the very slowly turning ventilators did produce a squeal that echoed up and down the metal ducts—pretty spooky, but not ghosts, at least as far as we could tell.But what about the attic wetting and parapet efflorescence?The patterns of wetting in the attic more strongly suggest bulk water leaks than condensation from leaking air. For sure, there is quite a bit of warm moist air making its way into the attic, through ceiling penetrations and the air permeable fiberglass and cellulose insulation. But we do know there is some level of rigid insulation between the roof deck and membrane, warming the attic air space (though we currently don’t know how much rigid insulation is on the roof deck). See the exterior brick efflorescence and the attic framing water stains in the photos below and the patterns they suggest.This roof framing in the attic is up against the brick parapet with water stains right where there is brick efflorescence on the exterior of the building.As water wicks through porous materials such as brick and mortar, calcium salts are solubilized and left behind as the water evaporates from the face of the brick. Efflorescence in and of itself is not a problem, and although it is typically the result of bulk water leaks, it can on occasion be driven by condensation (See this excellent BIA resource on brick efflorescence). The patterns of wetting discussed above though, correspond to the spotty brick efflorescence so almost certainly are the result of bulk water leakage at the parapet cap flashing.So, what are the solutions?The existing roof membrane is definitely coming up. At that time, the larger roof vents will be craned off for reuse (I found one of the larger Effico roof ventilators on sale on eBay as an antique for about $2100). Two of the smaller vents tied to small bathrooms will be eliminated and probably re-configured with through-wall exhaust. It’s possible that the last smaller Effico roof ventilator can stay and continue serve exhaust ventilation for the two locker rooms and the kitchen. The roof deck will be inspected for patterns of moisture damage, particularly at penetrations and at the parapet.The water stains on the top roof deck framing are more suggestive of bulk water leakage while the water stains on the lower ceiling overlay and strapping tie are more suggestive of wintertime condensation. When this photo was taken, it was about 20 degrees F outside, the roof deck was dry (inside and out), and the cellulose insulation was slightly damp.I don’t think the poorly installed fiberglass batts and cellulose insulation in the top floor ceiling has to come out; I think we can use a dewpoint calculation and enough roof deck rigid insulation to ensure that the attic space stays above dewpoint to avoid wintertime condensation.The school should invest in one or more CO2 monitors to determine just how much active ventilation the classrooms need in this admittedly quite leaky building. The school certainly is interested in protecting their historic building as well as their students.-Peter Yost is GBA’s technical director. He is also the founder of a consulting company in Brattleboro, Vermont, called Building-Wright. He routinely consults on the design and construction of both new homes and retrofit projects. He has been building, researching, teaching, writing, and consulting on high-performance homes for more than twenty years, and he’s been recognized as NAHB Educator of the Year. Do you have a building science puzzle? Contact Pete here. Photos courtesy of the author, except where noted. As it turns out, these vents are driven by a bit of each…To begin, the vents are quite beautifulThe turbine vents shown here are called Effico Roof Ventilators, manufactured by the WF Hirschman Co. in the 1920s.The name plate for the Effico W.F. Hirschman roof ventilators. Photo by Brian Knowles.The larger ones are about 4 feet in diameter and at nearly 100 years old, are still spinning freely.last_img read more

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How to Give Up Non-Deals

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now The only reason you keep working on deals you know you don’t have a real chance of closing is because you don’t have real opportunities with which to replace them. In order to rid yourself of time-wasting non-deals, you need to replace them with real opportunities.Massively Increase Your Prospecting EffortsThere isn’t any way to create more opportunities that doesn’t require you spend more time and more energy prospecting. You cannot create new opportunities until you develop new relationships.The more prospecting you do, the more relationships you develop, and the more opportunities you will create. The faster you do the necessary prospecting work, the faster you will produce the opportunities that allow you to ditch non-opportunities.Vary Your Approach and Use All Methods and ToolsSome of your prospective clients will respond to your phone call, cold, warm, or whatever. Others will respond to a LinkedIn connection. A small few may respond to an email request for a meeting, if it’s personal and value creating.The best place to start is referrals. The second best place to start is with deals that you lost in competitive situations in the past.There is no plan that includes waiting for inbound marketing or lead generation to do this work for you. You need to consistently use every method and every tool available.Build a Serious Plan to Nurture Your Dream ClientsThe problem with acting with a great sense of urgency is that it can be sporadic and undisciplined. There are some prospects for whom you need a proactive, disciplined, professionally persistent approach. These are your dream clients.A nurture plan is a blueprint for contacting your best prospects over time using a campaign. That campaign starts with a message that creates value for your dream client. That might be a blog post, white paper, or case study. That content is followed up with a phone call.Your nurture plan can be written in advance and used to pursue the small number of your very best prospects over the course of a year. You will get some of these dream clients to respond and engage with you. You will win some of them. Those will be your best deals and the best use of your time. But you still have to prospect and for other opportunities while you are nurturing your dream clients.last_img read more

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10 months agoMcGrath slams Man Utd players: I’ll go to grave knowing I gave my all

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say McGrath slams Man Utd players: I’ll go to grave knowing I gave my allby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United hero Paul McGrath says it’s time for the players to start playing for the fans.McGrath wrote for the Irish Independent: “Now the Manchester United players have to step up to the plate. And that’s from someone who knows what he is talking about.”You are reading here the words of a man who had a row with a Manchester United manager, someone he didn’t get on with.”But every time Alex Ferguson picked me to play in that famous red shirt, I went out and gave it my all. I will go to my grave certain of that.”And I played as hard as I could for three reasons.”Firstly, it was a matter of pure professional pride for me.”Secondly, because I wanted to show I was a half decent footballer.”And thirdly, and above all, because I was doing it for the supporters, those people who put their hands into their pockets for their hard-earned cash to watch the team and thus pay my wages.”That’s what I thought of when I was a Manchester United man, not that the manager wanted me out of the dressing-room.”There were Manchester United players who did not do those three things over the last few weeks and months.” last_img read more

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9 days agoEverton could lose Djibril Sidibe to AC Milan

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Everton could lose Djibril Sidibe to AC Milanby Paul Vegas9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton could lose Djibril Sidibe back to parent club AS Monaco in January.The Frenchman is currently on a season-long loan at Goodison Park, but is reportedly attracting interest from AC Milan.Fox Sports Italia says if Milan place a substantial bid for the defender this winter then Monaco would look to recall Sidibe so they call sell him to the Serie A giants.Sidibe is set to start against West Ham this weekend in place of the suspended Seamus Coleman. last_img read more

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