The Rhythm of the Nation

first_imgThe television advert featuring South Africans of all persuasions going about their daily work, creating the “rhythm of the nation”. The star of the advert – the conductor of the “orchestra” – is 10-year-old Tlotlego Tsagae, born on 27 April 1994.High Res streaming Low res streaming Downloadlast_img

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Photo library: Business and industry 4

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Business & Industry contact sheet (1.8MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Robertson Hlatshwyo works in the labelling plant at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. Producing 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employing some 900 staff, the brewery is the largest in the country. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Robertson Hlatshwyo works in the labelling plant at South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. Producing 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employing some 900 staff, the brewery is the largest in the country. Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: South African Breweries’ Alrode brewery. The largest in South Africa, it produces 1.9-million litres of beer a day and employs 900 staff.Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Scrap metal in transit in Alrode. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Scrap metal works in Alrode.Photo: Chris KirchhoffMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Maize cobs – known locally as mealies – for sale in the city centre. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Traders in the city centre. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Shop sign in Kliptown, Soweto. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Trainee diamond polisher Zubair Kassim inspects a diamond at the Harry Oppenheimer Diamond training school. Courses run from two weeks to eight months and include diamond polishing, polished diamond grading, gem identification and diamond evaluation. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 4: {loadposition business}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about using the image library? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]last_img read more

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SA chorus shines at world opera awards

first_img25 April 2013 South Africa’s Cape Town Opera beat 1 500 nominees from 41 countries to win the best opera chorus award at the inaugural International Opera Awards in London on Monday. Presenting the award during a ceremony at London’s Hilton Hotel, Opera magazine editor John Allison praised Cape Town Opera “for its energy and exciting commitment, which never fails to communicate itself to an audience and shows again why a chorus can be the backbone of any company”. Cape Town Opera managing director Michael Williams said in a statement afterwards that the award was “a climax to all the hard work of the company, particularly the chorus, last year. “Albert Horne (chorus master), you are to be congratulated on your leadership and musical ability. And to all the members of the chorus in Porgy & Bess, Mandela Trilogy, the Sheldonian Chorus Concert, the Porgy & Bess Concert in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic, and the concert tour to Melbourne, Australia – well done. This award belongs to you.” Other prizewinners at the inaugural awards included the Frankfurt Opera (opera company of the Year), New York’s Metropolitan Opera Company (orchestra of the year), Jonas Kauffmann (best male singer) and Nina Stemme (best female singer). SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Na klar!- Of course! Lackeys Learn German

first_imgLackey’s German Text BookAmong the sounds of “good morning” and “how are you?” you’ll hear Lackeys (employees at Groundspeak) sharing a “Guten Morgen!” or “Wie geht’s?” when passing in the hallway. Is this because we have suddenly become fluent in German? Sadly, no, but we are trying! 18 Lackeys met twice a week for eight weeks to learn how to better understand and communicate in German. The Founders of Geocaching.com sat next to Lackeys who answer emails from around the world and other Lackeys who commonly communicate with German geocachers.German language lessons at Groundspeak make sense. More than ten percent of geocaches located around the world today can be found on German soil. To see the incredible growth of geocaches in Germany, watch the YouTube video on this page. The video ends in 2009 when there were more than 118,000 geocaches in the country. Two years later, there are now more than 180,000 active geocaches in Germany.After eight weeks of lessons, Lackeys moved from, “Mein Name ist….” (My name is… ) and “Wie bitte?” (Beg you pardon) to mostly understanding “Jeremy und Bryan kommen per Fahrrad vorbei.” (Jeremy and Bryan are coming by on their bikes).  Lackey Annie Love recently met some German geocachers in the Groundspeak lobby with some freshly learned language skills: “Woher kommen Sie?” (where do you come from?)Understandably Lackey’s are not fluent in German… yet. More German language classes are in the works.As the global geocaching community grows, Groundspeak Lackeys strive to understand the local languages, culture and most importantly how to best serve local geocaching communities. You can choose to read the main sections of Geocaching.com in any one of eleven different languages. Geocaching unites more than five million geocachers around the world, regardless of whether they say “Hello” or “Hallo” or “Ahoj” or “Hej” or “Hola” or “Ciao” or “Bonjour” or “Olá” or “Witam” or “Tere,” we all say “Geocaching.” Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedThe Lackey Geocoin: An Unexpected 26,000-mile, 5-Year JourneyJanuary 21, 2015In “Community””Stadt im Wald” GC17K3A GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – June 6, 2011June 6, 2011In “Community”Geocoinfest 2011 – Europa: Travels with the World’s First GeocoinSeptember 14, 2011In “Community”last_img read more

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Researchers Test a New Type of Insulation

first_imgResearchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have helped develop a type of building insulation that combines vacuum panel cores and rigid foam. The new composite boards have double the thermal performance per inch of insulation now on the market. In an announcement, ORNL said that the modified atmosphere insulation (MAI) composite had resistance to heat flow “at least twice that of current building insulation materials made of plastic foams, cellulose or fiberglass.” “We’ve proven that MAI-based composites are technically viable options for buildings, providing higher performance than current insulations,” study co-author Kaushik Biswas said in a prepared statement.RELATED ARTICLESInsulation ChoicesChoosing Rigid FoamDoes Vacuum Insulation Make Sense? The results of their study were published in the journal Applied Energy. (A short summary of their findings can be viewed online for free, but the full article is behind a paywall.) Vacuum insulated panels (VIPs) are an established technology, but their use is limited. VIPs are much better insulators than conventional products, but they are expensive, can’t be modified in the field, and may show a loss of performance over time as the vacuum seal gradually degrades. For those reasons, VIPs are a specialty product useful in some situations but not as a replacement for conventional types of building insulation. The MAI composite boards were created in a semi-automatic operation and were much simpler to make than traditional vacuum insulation panels, lowering costs to within reach for some retrofit applications, according to researchers who worked on the project. Real world testing is underway In a telephone call, project manager André Desjarlais said Oak Ridge collaborated with two manufacturers — Firestone and NanoPore — to develop panels that combine fumed silica, barrier materials borrowed from the food industry, and polyisocyanurate foam board. Samples from a limited production run were installed in a low-slope rooftop in Caribou, Maine, over the summer (see the photos in the gallery above). The new insulation consists of MAI panels completely encased in polyiso. The composite has at least two advantages over the vacuum panels that have been on the market for decades: they’re much cheaper to make, and they should last for 25 years without a significant decline in R-value. A 2-inch-thick MAI/polyiso panel has an R-value of about 25, or R-12+ per inch — about twice as high as polyiso foam alone. By themselves, the sealed MAI packages have an R-value of 40 per inch. “The idea of having this encapsulated package and pulling a vacuum on it and getting a high R-value has been around for 40 years, maybe longer,” Desjarlais said. “The issue has always been one of cost.” In its early work with NanoPore, the lab learned that 80% of the cost of vacuum panels is in manufacturing. To lower the cost, researchers started with fumed silica, a common and relatively inexpensive nano material that already has broad commercial uses (it’s used to filter swimming pool water, for example). They combined that with an outer barrier material similar to what is used in the food industry to keep products fresh. “We’re basically taking a potato chip bag and filling it with dirt,” he said. “That’s what we’ve got.” The lab also worked with Firestone, a major producer of polyiso panels for the commercial roofing market. The group adapted an existing foam line and found a way to insert a dozen MAI panels inside a 4×8 sheet of foam. The facing of the foam is printed to show where the panels are located, so that if the roofing contractor wants to use mechanical fasteners to install the sheets it can be done — providing the installer is careful. In the Maine test installation, Desjarlais said, the roof was divided into thirds. In one section, installers used mechanical fasteners to put down the insulation; in another the sheets were fully adhered (no mechanical fasteners). On the last section, a double layer of polyiso was installed. So far, embedded sensors indicate that all parts of the roof are performing about the same. Desjarlais said he’d like to return to the test site with an infrared camera when it gets a little colder for a followup visit. Costs are coming down A major goal of the project was to find a way to make high-performance panels at an attractive cost. Loose-fill fiberglass costs between 3 and 5 cents per square foot per R, Desjarlais explained, while rigid foam insulation costs about 10 cents per square foot per R. “We’re about in the 20-cent range, where it used to be a buck,” he said. “We’ve made a big dent in the cost.” Although the new vacuum panels are not yet competitive with conventional building insulation, “it’s getting close.” A simulator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory used to test the performance of a new type of insulation panel. With lower costs, Desjarlais thinks the panels could have two important applications: retrofits for low-slope commercial roofs, and residential energy retrofits. Rooftops of commercial buildings are often crowded with mechanical equipment and access hatches, making it difficult if not economically impossible to add layers of conventional polyiso during an upgrade. Having R-25 panels only 2 inches thick would be a breakthrough when space is a key issue. Roofers would find the insulation very familiar. “We wanted to come up with packaging similar to what contractors see today,” Desjarlais said. “What better place to put it then right inside the foam board they’re used to handling. It looks like, it tastes like, it smells like a piece of polyiso foam. The only time you’ll know that it’s not is when you pick it up. It weights about five times more than a piece of polyiso foam.” Residential energy upgrades also are a likely target for producers. A 2-inch-thick panel applied to the outside of the house would be enough to meet current energy codes in the continental U.S., even if the house had no cavity insulation, Desjarlais said. One problem would be wall areas where standard 4×8 sheets or half sheets wouldn’t fit. Like the old vacuum panels, MAI sheets can’t be cut in the field without piercing the barrier and ruining the vacuum. The solution would be for a contractor to have standard polyiso on hand to fill in spots where the vacuum-panel sheets wouldn’t work. Better performance over time One advantage of making the cores of the vacuum panels from fumed silicate is that high R-values are possible without pulling a very “hard” vacuum, Desjarlais said. And, when plotting R-values against pressure, the curve tends to be very flat over a wide range of vacuum pressures, from 10 to 100 torr (torr is a unit of measurement for vacuums). That means the panels can afford to lose a relatively large amount of vacuum before their thermal performance fails. “We can over-evacuate it and have quite a bit of cushion in vacuum loss before we see any significant loss of R-value,” Desjarlais said. “We think we can get 25 years of service out of a panel if we evacuate to a certain level. Even if it leaks, the R-value loss is minimal.” Leaks should be less likely because the barrier material that’s used to encase the silica also is much better than what was available 25 years ago. Back then, vacuum panels relied on a two-component barrier of aluminized Mylar. Today, barrier materials are six or seven layers thick and don’t cost any more, he said. Coming to market? It’s one thing to develop a promising prototype in the lab, and another altogether to invest in manufacturing and marketing to get it to consumers. The panels appear to be working exactly as designed on a roof in Caribou, Maine, but will either NeoPore or Firestone feel good enough about its commercial prospects to bring it to market? That’s not a question Desjarlais can answer. Both firms are apparently weighing their options at the moment and have not made a decision. “I would say I’m cautiously optimistic,” Desjarlais said. GBA emailed inquiries to both companies seeking comment on how likely it was that the ORNL research would result in a commercially available product. In a reply, Firestone spokeswoman Laura McCaslin confirmed the company is working on the insulation, adding, “We can’t comment on any additional details at this time regarding commercialization or future plans for going to market as they have not been determined.” NeoPore did not respond. This post was updated on Sept. 25 to include new information from Firestone.last_img read more

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Google Glass Shows Off Upcoming Apps: Path, NY Times, Evernote & Skitch

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … taylor hatmaker Tags:#Google#Google Glass#Project Glass#SXSW 2013 Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Photos by Taylor Hatmaker. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Beyond what we’ve seen so far in the official videos and demos using Google’s own suite of products, Google Glass will also be getting some big-name third-party apps. At a somewhat last-minute event announced for SXSW 2013, Developer Advocate Timothy Jordan spoke to a room hungry for more intel about Google’s buzzy wearable tech, Project Glass. While he didn’t reveal a launch date, Jordan did say Google Glass has been working on an app with the The New York Times. The re-thought news reader app lets Google Glass wearers visually scan headlines and have stories read aloud with the device’s built-in speaker, which only Glass wearer can hear.Path will be another early entrant to the Glass app marketplace. Path is a social feed designed around tracking your life and sharing what you’re up to with your inner social circles. While a great many people don’t seem to know what to do with Path, its “in the background” ethos seems to make it a natural fit for Google Glass.There’s more than just news reading and social apps, too. Google said that productivity darling Evernote (and its image-snapping partner, Skitch) will also tie into Glass, letting wearers share and annotate images all while syncing them seamlessly with their accounts. Take a sneak peek of the first wave of Google Glass apps in the photos below: last_img read more

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Augmented Reality Technology: The Nuts And Bolts

first_imgMelissa Crooks is Content Writer who writes for Hyperlink Infosystem, a mobile app development company based in USA & India that holds the best team of skilled and expert app developers. She is a versatile tech writer and loves exploring latest technology trends, entrepreneur and startup column. Tags:#Trending Melissa Crooks AR And VR: Which is More Important to Emerging … Augmented reality (AR) is obviously one of the world’s biggest digital stories of all time. The successful release and debut of Pokémon Go happened to be a striking demonstration of the potential abilities of the new technology which is aimed at providing a new and solid platform for customer engagement. This is the mobile game produced by a mobile app development company that brought Augmenter reality (AR) into the limelight.For the first time in history, developers were able to successfully turn imaginations into reality. Now, many mobile app development companies are following suit. Though Pokémon Go didn’t last that much on the radar, the underlying technology that powered its ascension is not really over as many may be thinking. As a matter of fact, the technology has just begun its course.Now that some brands are beginning to consider AR for their local marketing initiatives, it is obvious that the technology isn’t just for gamers alone.What is the technology all about?Augmented reality (AR) is one aspect of modern technology that is steadily proving its usefulness in daily lives of every technology buff. Due to its wondrous ability to transform the real world with awesome elements from the virtual world, AR is just on the move to enhance the things people feel, hear, and see. While serving as a link between the real world and the virtual world, augmented reality is holding the ace for mixed reality spectrum.Just so you know, this is a unique technology that seeks to augment the live views (direct or indirect) of the natural environment using superimposed computer-generated images to establish an enhanced version of reality. Basically, it seeks to use images to provide an enhanced version of how individuals perceive reality and view the real world.When you hear word “augmented,” the first thing that comes to bare is “add something.” This is exactly the principle behind the objectives of this technology. Ultimate, AR is concerned with the use of touch feedback, sounds, and graphics to augment the natural world of its users. In this situation, you don’t need to inhabit a whole virtual environment as is the case with virtual reality.AR revolves around the use of virtual information to augment, in other words, enhance, the existing natural environment of the user. To this end, users tend to achieve an augmented reality (AR) experience of a whole new and improved world where virtual and real worlds harmoniously relate. In a bid to provide the required assistance in their day to day activities, virtual information is also employed to enhance the augmented reality experience.Application of AR can be experienced in either a simple fashion such as a text-notification or more complicated manner such providing relevant information/instruction as to how a life-threatening surgical procedure can be effectively performed. Already, many AR app development companies are using this technology to provide accessible and timely data, enhance understandings, and highlight certain features.It may interest you to know that business apps and smartphone apps are only a few of the numerous applications already driving augmented reality (AR) application development in the industry. It is important to know that the relevancy of this technology in the today’s world of transformations cannot be underestimated as it is gradually going to affect every stratum of human engagement and interaction.Types of Augmented RealityAt the moment, there are several existing categories of AR technology. It may interest you to know how they employ varying application use cases and objects. Here are some of the various technologies any AR app development company can explore to develop their own augmented reality apps.Superimposition Based Augmented RealityWhether partially or dull developed, most AR app development companies employ superimposition based augmented reality to create a newly augmented view of an object that can be used to replace the original view of the very same object. The app will only be able to effectively replace the original view of an object with an augmented one only when it can determine the object model.So, when it comes to developing AR apps based on superimposition, it is important to understand the role object recognition plays. A typical example of this form of AR technology can be observed in the Ikea augmented reality furniture catalogue. This type of superimposition based AR strategy presents a strong consumer-facing example that enables users to strategically locate virtual Ikea furniture in their own home with the help of augmented reality (AR). All they need to do is to download the app and use it to scan digital or printed catalog in some selected places.Projection-Based Augmented RealityWith this technology, users can easily get involved with a new form of AR which simply projects artificial light onto real-world surfaces. It allows for human interaction by releasing light onto a real-world surface and then stimulating the human interaction of the projected light through touch or any other means. Most projection-based augmented reality apps are designed to detect user interaction by differentiating between a known or expected project and the altered projection which occurs as a result of the user’s interaction. The use of laser plasma technology to launch an interactive hologram (based on a three-dimensional analysis) into mid-air is another interesting application of projection-based AR.Markerless Augmented RealityThis technology is one of the most widely utilized applications of augmented reality. Also known as GPS, position based, or location-based, markerless AR employs an accelerometer, velocity meter, digital compass, or GPS embedded in the device to provide data based on the user’s location. The wide availability of mobile devices (tablets and smartphones), as well as their enhanced location detection abilities, have helped to establish a strong force behind the growth and expansion of the markerless augmented reality technology. This technology is commonly featured with location-centric mobile apps that are used for finding nearby businesses and mapping directions.Marker Based Augmented RealityAlso known as Image Recognition, any AR app development company can employ the marker based AR technology to create application-based results. Basically, it involves the use of a distinct, but simple pattern such as a QR/2D code and a camera to produce results. This is only achievable when a reader is used to sense the marker. The camera on the device plays an important role in helping to distinguish a marker from other real-world objects. How AR and VR Will Enhance Customer Experience How a Modern Gaming Engine Can Supercharge Your… Related Posts Few Industries will not be Transformed by AR an…last_img read more

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Trade reaction to U by Uniworlds Uturn Its a good idea to

first_img Kathryn Folliott Tuesday, March 20, 2018 Tags: Uniworld Trade reaction to U by Uniworld’s U-turn: “It’s a good idea to open up the age restriction” Share About Latest Posts Kathryn FolliottEditor at TravelweekKathryn is Editor at Travelweek and has worked for the company since 1995. She has travelled to more than 50 countries and counts Hong Kong, Jerusalem, the Swiss Alps and the Galapagos Islands among her favourite destinations. Latest posts by Kathryn Folliott (see all) “They need to go where the bucks are”: Agents on ACTA partnership – April 18, 2019 As the cost of doing business climbs, host agencies, retail groups say they have options – April 4, 2019 As of 2021 Europe-bound clients will need to apply online for a visa waiver and pay a fee – April 3, 2019 << Previous PostNext Post >> This story originally ran in the March 15th, 2018 issue of Travelweek magazine. To get Travelweek delivered to your agency for free, subscribe here. TORONTO — A boost in bookings from travel agents for clients in their late 40s, 50s and beyond may have helped sway Uniworld’s recent decision to lift the 21-45 age restriction on its U by Uniworld ships.Just a few months ago, U by Uniworld introduced new ‘UToo’ departures that waived the 21-45 age restriction for eight dates.The cruise line opened those sailings up to its trade partners to sell – and saw a significant spike in business as a result.For any travel agent booking older clients on those UToo departures, Uniworld’s decision to drop the 21-45 age restriction was less of a surprise and more of a wise business move.What was Uniworld hearing from its trade partners that clinched the decision to open up the U by Uniworld age range to a much deeper client base?“Many of our trade partners were telling us that they have clients in their 40s and 50s who very were interested in the U concept and liked the contemporary stylish décor, U Time Excursions and fun onboard programming like paint & wine, silent disco, etc. but were just outside the age range,” says Michelle Palma, Uniworld’s VP – Field Sales, North America.The age range will change for U by Uniworld sailings, but not the onboard experience, says Michelle Palma, Uniworld’s VP – Field Sales, North America. Uniworld is updating its trade and consumer websites and social media channels and is in the process of creating updated FAQs for front line teams to reflect the new policy.The target audience is virtually the same, she says. Only the age range has changed. “At this point, we have no plans to change our included meal or excursion programs. [And] we plan to keep the onboard programming exactly the same. This is the essence of what U by Uniworld is all about and that is what’s driving the demand in the market.”More news:  Air Canada’s global sales update includes Managing Director, Canada & USA SalesEarlier this month the cruise line sent out word to its retail partners that effective immediately, U by Uniworld sailings – previously restricted to ages 21-45 and marketed heavily to Millennials – are now open to all adults of all ages. The cruise line’s two ships, The A and The B, set sail in April 2018 with four eight-day itineraries on the Rhine, Main, Danube and Seine Rivers.Uniworld says it has made the changes to all of its trade and consumer websites and social media channels and is in the process of creating updated FAQs for front line teams.Uniworld’s decision is ultimately good news especially given the record high demand for river cruise product, say agents.Sandra McLeod with RedDoorTravel in LaSalle, ON says Uniworld made the right move.“I thought it might limit interest by both customers and agents when it first came out,” said McLeod. “It’s a good idea to open up the age restriction. There is a very large and active Baby Boomer group that was left out of trying this new experience. These are also the customers that have more disposable income and time to travel.”Dining onboard The BThat’s not to say the 21-45s don’t travel well, says McLeod. But “the appeal of more modern ships, more active and immersive excursions, healthier food choices will attract a wide range of clientele.”To minimize confusion between Uniworld’s boutique product and the U by Uniworld product, it will be important going forward to emphasize the differences between the ships and experiences, says McLeod.Matthew Eichhorst, Global Cruise Leader for Expedia Inc. and President, Expedia CruiseShipCenters, is onboard with the decision as well. “U by Uniworld offers a new take on independent, experiential travel, and Uniworld’s decision to revise their age restriction will allow more like-minded adults to fully enjoy what this innovative new cruise line has to offer.”More news:  Consolidation in the cruise industry as PONANT set to acquire Paul Gauguin CruisesTravel companies have been racing to deliver product to the coveted Millennial demographic. The oldest Millennials are now in their mid-to-late 30s and dedicated travellers from an early age.The number of Millennials who say they ‘definitely will’ book a cruise for their next trip was up from 63% to 70% this year, according to CLIA’s 2018 consumer research.CLIA says it’s also seeing Millennials develop a taste for luxury cruising. Their share of the premium and luxury cruise segments is higher than average, notes CLIA.CLIA’s survey of favourite types of vacations showed that 8% of Millennials favour river cruises, more even than Gen Xers (3%), Baby Boomers (5%) and older Traditionalists (6%).But family vacation opportunities are at a premium and that’s especially true for Millennials with young kids. While some Millennials may be lucky enough to convince the grandparents to babysit the little ones while they enjoy an adults-only getaway, most Millennial passengers in their 20s and 30s who have kids are looking for cruise options that are family-friendly.Time is at a premium too. CLIA’s survey shows that 3 – 5 day cruises are most favoured by Millennials (39%), compared to 26% for Gen Xers, 14% for Boomers and 6% for Traditionalists.It’s the older segments – the Boomers and the Traditionalists – who have the vacation time and inclination to embark on the longer durations more typical of European cruises. Posted bylast_img read more

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