Forum on HIV/AIDS and hunger cites importance of faith groups

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Forum on HIV/AIDS and hunger cites importance of faith groups Ecumenical & Interreligious, HIV/AIDS Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By John ZarocostasPosted Mar 1, 2012 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Archbishop of Canterbury, [Ecumenical News International, Geneva] Senior U.N. officials, business leaders, and development experts on Feb. 29 praised faith groups’ support of global efforts to fight HIV/AIDS and hunger but also stressed their continued support was vital in confronting daunting challenges ahead.During the forum, which was held at the Geneva headquarters of the World Health Organization and included the participation of Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, participants also praised the strong human rights-based approach taken by faith groups.Challenges ahead, they said, include new threats posed by climate change and how to increase food output to feed an extra two billion people as the world’s population is projected to increase to nine billion by 2050.“We are counting on our faith-based partners and their networks to fight this disease (HIV/AIDS),” said Dr. Debrework Zewdie, deputy executive director at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.“Without them, the millions of people that depend on us would not be reached,” Zewdie noted. She also thanked groups such as the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) for raising funds to fight infectious diseases in Africa such as malaria.But she also pointed out faith organizations play a major role in helping communities in developing countries increase testing for HIV and in fighting stigmatization of people living with HIV/AIDS.Williams said that for the faith communities, testing and tackling issues of stigmatization and marginalization is key.Jon Pender, a vice president of pharmaceutical group GlaxoSmithKline told delegates the role of faith-based groups is vital in delivering care and treatment. Ellen ‘t Hoen, executive director of the Medicines Patent Pool, which works to improve access to treatment, said the strong support by faith organizations for corporate social responsibility has played an important role in helping to secure life-saving antiretroviral medicines.With regards to fighting hunger, David Nabarro, U.N. special representative for food security and nutrition, emphasized that one-third of the world’s children are chronically malnourished, and new threats of climate change pose serious challenges across the globe.Peter Prove, executive director of the Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance (EAA), highlighted that finding ways to reduce food waste by consumers should not be overlooked.Williams remarked that faith communities exist “to help continuously.” He also said that an excessive focus on short-term results “is the enemy,” and argued on the need to focus on sustainable production.Forum organizers included EAA and members Brot fur Alle, Caritas, LWF, World Alliance of YMCAs, World Student Christian Federation and World Vision International, in collaboration with the World Council of Churches and the Permanent Mission of the United Kingdom. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Health & Healthcare, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Head of Jacksonville Episcopal School killed in murder-suicide

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral Dean Kate Moorehead, second from right, listens as State Attorney Angela Corey, left, speaks with investigators and faculty near the back entrance of Episcopal High School March 6 in Jacksonville, Fla. after a shooting at the school. (AP Photo/The Florida Times-Union, Bob Self)[Episcopal News Service] A Spanish teacher who had been fired earlier in the day March 6 shot and killed Dale D. Regan, the head of Episcopal School in Jacksonville, Florida, on the school’s campus and then turned the gun on himself.Police said Shane Schumerth, 28, came on campus with an AK-47 in a guitar case, went to the administrative office and shot Regan several times before killing himself, according to a report from News4 television station. Teacher Carolyn Cooper told News4 she heard five gunshots.Regan had been at Episcopal for 34 years, teaching English before she became head of school, according to Moorehead. Regan was profiled by the Times-Union in May 2010 during the school’s expansion.Schumerth was hired in August 2010. He graduated from Purdue University with a B.A. in Spanish and had taught Spanish to students of all ages, including an immersion program to eighth graders, the school said at the time.“No children have been injured,” Jacksonville Sherriff’s Office spokeswoman Melissa Bujeda told media at the scene just after 2 p.m., about 30 minutes after the shooting. “This doesn’t appear to be involving any student at the school.”However, some students knew something bad was happening.“Another teacher came in and said, ‘Go to the small office on the side and hide,’” 11th-grader Maria Boyance told News4. “A lot of people were crying and freaking out, but the teachers stayed calm the whole time.”Lilly Sheppard, 13 and in the eighth grade, told the Florida Times-Union newspaper that she was close to where the shooting happened, but didn’t hear gunshots. The head of the upper school ordered her to go back to where she was when she walked out of a classroom. She said she was then evacuated from the school about 20 minutes later.Sheppard called the teacher “shy” and said “he didn’t really seem to fit in with the other teachers.”That morning there were rumors he’d been fired, Sheppard said.“No one seemed that surprised that he’d been fired,” she told the newspaper.Dale Regan, head of Episcopal School of Jacksonville, Florida, was killed March 6 by a teacher fired earlier in the day. Photo/Episcopal School“We have full confidence that Dale Regan is already with God and in heaven with our Lord and savior Jesus, but we ask for your prayers as we mourn this great leader,” the Very Rev. Kate Moorehead, dean of St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Jacksonville, said during a later media briefing at the scene with Undersheriff Dwain Senterfitt.Moorehead is vice chair of the school’s board, and Senterfitt’s daughter graduated from Episcopal. “I knew Ms. Regan pretty well, too,” Senterfitt told reporters.Moorehead said, “We have to reassure the students that Dale believed in God and that she, in fact, is in a good place but that it’s okay to be angry and to be upset. I think all of us will go through a lot of emotions in the coming months and even years as we remember this incident.”She also urged parents to pray with their children and to pray for Regan. She also urged parents and students to “pray for the man who was so distraught that he committed this terrible act of violence — pray for his soul.”The school said in part on its website that “the entire school family mourns the loss of our friend and leader.”The school will be closed until March 19, according to the statement. Students were scheduled to be on spring break next week.“We are deeply shocked and saddened to hear of the tragic death of Dale Regan,” the Rev. Daniel R. Heischman, executive director of the National Association of Episcopal Schools, said in a statement. “Our hearts and prayers go out to all members of that community, her family, and her friends. Dale Regan was a great leader of an Episcopal school, deeply devoted to the school that she loved and served for so long, and we have all lost a visionary educator and compassionate human being.”At least three churches, including the cathedral, San Jose Episcopal Parish and St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Jacksonville announced that they would hold prayer services this evening. A memorial service is reportedly planned at the school for March 10.Jacksonville-based Diocese of Florida Bishop Samuel Johnson Howard and other Episcopal clergy gathered at the school to provide pastoral care if they were needed, the Rev. Kurt Dunkle, rector at Grace Episcopal Church in Orange Park, told the Times-Union.“One of the great gifts of being part of a larger church, which we call a diocese, is that when you need your colleagues, they show up,” Dunkle told reporters.Dunkle was in a meeting with Howard when they heard about shootings. The first thing Dunkle did was call to check on the well-being of his daughter, who is a senior at the school.Bujeda said in her short statement to the media that law-enforcement officials received a call at 1:23 p.m. EST reporting that a man was on campus with a firearm, followed by a subsequent call saying that “they had heard shot fired.” When police arrived they found two people dead, she said.Emails were sent just after 2 p.m. to parents of Episcopal High School students telling them to “respond to the normal pick up location” because “the situation is under control. At this time there are no outstanding suspects,” according to a Times-Union news story.Traffic was apparently backed up for blocks along Atlantic Boulevard leading to the school that describes itself as providing “a superior college-preparatory education for students in grades six through twelve within a nurturing Christian atmosphere.”The school has an enrollment of 900 students with 300 in the middle school and 600 in the upper school. Episcopal’s main campus, the Munnerlyn Campus, is situated on 56 acres along the south bank of the St. Johns River in central Jacksonville, according to information on its website. The student-to-teacher ratio is 10 to 1; the average class size is 17. Episcopal employs 90 faculty, all of whom have 4-year degrees or higher; 65 percent have graduate degrees and 3 percent have earned a doctorate. The average teaching tenure for faculty members is 19.75 years.Lauren Baxter, a parent of an Episcopal High School student, told the media that “private school, public school, these things happen. Who knows what the circumstance were,” and added that “this is a very safe school and very wonderful school, and if something happened here, it can happen anywhere.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tony Green says: Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ March 7, 2012 at 10:15 pm Clair,I’m in Jacksonville at St.Marks.If I can help your family let me know.Sandy VTS 97 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 7, 2012 at 2:30 am It is very sad to hear of this news.May God’s blessings be upon the School.John Yamane ,Retired Priest of Nippon Sei Ko Kai Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rev Sandra Moyle says: Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Head of Jacksonville Episcopal School killed in murder-suicide No students involved, killer was teacher fired earlier in day March 6, 2012 at 8:58 pm I lift up the families of both these victims at this time of their loss. May the Lord receive Ms. Regan into his nearer presence, and be with all the friends and people of both these victims in this their hour of need. God’s special blessings be upon the Episcopal High School and the Diocese at this difficult time! Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest martha knight says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Gun Violence Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET March 6, 2012 at 6:42 pm Know that my prayers are with Episcopal High School and certainly with this Diocese over this senseless violence. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 6, 2012 Randy Dean says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments (5) Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN John Yamane says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN March 6, 2012 at 7:42 pm It may be hardest to lift up the perpetrator and his family. Let us try.last_img read more

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Episcopal Church’s ACC members eager to work on common life

first_imgEpiscopal Church’s ACC members eager to work on common life Agenda ranges from Scripture, continuing dialogue to covenant, budget Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Auckland’s Holy Trinity Cathedral, shown here with historic St. Mary’s Cathedral in the background, will be the site of most of the Anglican Consultative Council’s 15th meeting Oct. 27-Nov. 7.[Episcopal News Service] The 15th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council Oct. 27-Nov. 7 is being billed in Auckland, New Zealand, as a “once in a lifetime” event that will be “the biggest-ever Anglican gathering to hit these shores.”And, the Episcopal Church’s ACC members are eager to be part of a gathering that will discern ways in which Anglicans can deepen their understanding of their common call to God’s mission in the world.“I am more optimistic about the [Anglican] Communion than I have been in recent years,” Josephine Hicks, the Episcopal Church’s longest-serving member of the ACC, told Episcopal News Service. “I hope that optimism is reinforced at this meeting.”The ACC is the Anglican Communion’s most representative decision-making body and includes more than 80 bishops, clergy and laity. It makes policy, approves the Anglican Communion Office’s budget and guides the communion’s agenda for mission and ministry.While it has no jurisdiction over the 38 individual provinces of the communion, its constitution says that its objective is “to advance the Christian religion and in particular to promote the unity and purposes of the Churches of the Anglican Communion in mission, evangelism, ecumenical relations, communication, administration and finance.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in comments e-mailed to ENS that the ACC “provides a focused opportunity for cross-provincial dialogue about issues of local and more global concern, and it is the only body of the Anglican Communion that makes formal legislative decisions.”Meetings of the ACC are a “key and important way the Anglican Communion comes together,” Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, the church’s episcopal member on the ACC, told ENS.Douglas added that “while [the ACC’s] primary job is advocating positions – we can’t force any church to do anything – the Anglican Communion itself at this level of common participation is broadly representative and we celebrate that kind of representative coming together that embraces differences, different orders, different genders, different peoples from around the world and that’s not to be minimized.”The ACC’s diverse members will be asked to consider issues ranging from the current status of the Anglican Covenant and the Anglican Communion Office’s financial situation, to ecumenical and interfaith relations and reviews of the work of the office’s staff and that of the communion’s 14 networks that help coordinate the communion’s work of mission and social justice.Also, members have been asked to report on the status of the Anglican Covenant in their provinces.Jefferts Schori said it is “hard to say what will come forward [out of the ACC’s covenant discussion] for decision or position statements, though this is the first time the ACC has said it would discuss membership and ways forward around the covenant.”Douglas suggested that “there was probably a hope that more churches would have adopted the covenant than have at this point,” and that fact “draws into stark relief” the question of the covenant’s future.He predicted the covenant discussion could include questions of how many provinces must adopt the covenant before it is considered to be in effect and what the timeframe for adoption might be. None has yet been sent, even though the provinces have had the covenant for nearly three years.“And then a related question is the other end: If the covenant does not have, if you will, legs, then when is the covenant discussion drawn to an end?” Douglas added.If the “covenant exercise,” as Douglas put it, were to end, its impact would still have been worthwhile, he said.“I think most people would say that one way or another it has engendered more discussion across the Anglican Communion as to what’s the nature of our belonging together. Even if you are against this particular draft or the whole idea of a covenant, we are having substantial discussions about what does it mean to be part of the Anglican Communion and that’s good.”The Rev. Gay Jennings, president of the House of Deputies and the church’s clerical ACC member, told ENS that she comes to her first ACC meeting in hope that that covenant exercise will point the communion in a different direction.“Given the lack of enthusiasm for the proposed Anglican Covenant, I hope that at this meeting the Anglican Consultative Council can catalyze more collaborative and productive ways for the Anglican Communion to pursue the mission to which God calls us in our ministries around the world,” she said in a comment e-mailed to ENS.Hicks says it seems the covenant “has lost a lot of steam” and while she is “not prepared to say it will never happen,” she sees the need for Anglicans to come together and learn from each other. Those opportunities, such as the communion’s Continuing Indaba process, ought to provide ways “for people to meet each other, spend time together, spend time with each other in different contexts — really engage with each other on issues in a genuine and thoughtful way, not in the context of plenary debates on the floor of some legislative body, but sitting around tables with a cup of coffee, talking about issues.”“I think that [model] has much more promise for Anglicans to regain a stronger sense of unity and a renewed sense of common mission, even in spite of different views on issues,” she added.The Anglican Covenant first was proposed in the 2004 Windsor Report as a way that the communion and its provinces might maintain unity despite differences, especially relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality issues. The last ACC meeting, in Jamaica in May 2009, decided to delay release of the third and final draft of the covenant to the provinces for their consideration because the ACC members thought the covenant’s process for resolving disputes needed more work.After a small working group solicited input from the provinces about that process, the final version of the covenant was released to the provinces for formal consideration in December 2009. Seven provinces (Ireland, Mexico, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, South East Asia, Southern Cone of America, and the West Indies) have approved or subscribed to it. Two (the Scottish Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia) have refused to adopt it, and the Episcopal Church in the Philippines’ bishops also have rejected it.In March, it became clear that the Church of England could not adopt the covenant in its current form when a majority of its dioceses voted the document down.The Church in Wales in April gave the covenant “an amber light, rather than a green light” as its governing body said it feared the Church of England’s rejection of the covenant jeopardized its future.The Anglican Church of Southern Africa has adopted the document pending ratification at its next synod meeting later this year.At the General Convention in July, the Episcopal Church, via Resolution B005, “declined to take a position” on the covenant. Convention also passed Resolution D008 which pledged that the Episcopal Church would “maintain and reinforce strong links across the world-wide Anglican Communion committing itself to continued participation in the wider councils of the Anglican Communion” and “deepen its involvement with communion ministries and networks.”While some people have suggested that acceptance or rejection of the covenant might determine a province’s future membership in the communion, Douglas said such a position would be “an erroneous starting point” and “divisive.”“I don’t think there’s a spirit right now in the Anglican Communion or in the ACC that is wanting to foment that kind of divisiveness and that kind of discussion tending towards alienation,” he said.Hicks, who began her term with the ACC’s 13th meeting in Nottingham, England, in June 2005 when the Episcopal Church and Anglican Church of Canada representatives had voluntarily withdrawn from the meeting and attended only as observers following a request from the provinces’ leaders, would agree.“The strongest theme … since 2005 — being involved in these Anglican Consultative Council meetings and continuing to stay in touch with members of the ACC inbetween meetings — is that we have much more in common than we differ on as Anglicans and most people are really interested in focusing on our common mission and do not want differences of opinion on sexuality or any other issue to derail that,” she said.Also on the ACC agenda in Auckland is:the work of the Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order (IASCUFO), including the Anglican Covenant process;the communion’s ecumenical dialogues with a report from the communion’s Network for Inter Faith Concerns;discussion of the ongoing Bible in the Life of the Church project begun at the last ACC meeting as well as other theological education efforts and the Continuing Indaba project;reports and possible resolutions for future work from the communion’s networks;discussion of the work of all four instruments of communion, of which the ACC is one, (the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, and the Primates Meeting being the others);discussions of the environment, gender-based violence and Christian witness based on the  results of three evening sessions, one on each of the topics, to which members of the public have been invited;approval of a budget for the Anglican Communion Office, a discussion during which Douglas said “the Episcopal Church as members will have to be accountable” for a decision made at General Convention this summer to contribute $700,000, or just more than a fourth of what is asked, to the budget. The church’s Executive Council agreed Oct. 18 to increase the church’s 2013 contribution by $104,000 in recognition of what Bishop Stacy Sauls, chief operating officer, called a mistaken reduction in the triennial amount. Council members agreed they would revisit the church’s contributions in 2014 and 2015;a visit to the Maori King Tuheitia Paki, the seventh leader of the Kingitanga movement; anda Nov. 4 “Mission Encounter” during which ACC members will be dispersed among the province’s cathedrals, parishes and pastorates, and to the centers of the major hui amorangi (the equivalent of dioceses in the Maori portion of the church). Many of the ordained members of the council will preach in local churches. Back in Auckland the next day, the ACC plans a discussion of mission informed by what the members learned the previous day.ACC-15 opens with a powhiri on the morning of Oct. 27 at the TelstraClear Pacific Events Centre in Auckland. The powhiri, a central part of Māori protocol, is a ceremony of welcome involving speeches, dancing, singing and hongi, the traditional Māori greeting in which two people press their foreheads and/or noses together.Students from Anglican schools in Auckland and the surrounding area will form a kapa haka party as part of the welcome. Kapa haka is a traditional Māori performance art that can include soft choral singing with war chants, screams, foot stamping, tongue protrusions and rhythmic body slapping.There also will be a time during which young people can ask Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams about the state of the church and its future.Later on Oct. 27, the ACC will get an orientation to the meeting and close the day with evening worship. Those two events will take place in Auckland’s Holy Trinity Cathedral, the site of the ACC meeting.The meeting’s opening Eucharist is set for the morning of Oct. 28 at the cathedral and Williams will preach.Additional ACC backgroundFormed in 1969, the ACC’s membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s provinces. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership.Bishop James Tengatenga of Southern Malawi chairs the ACC and Elizabeth Paver, lay representative for the Church of England, is vice chair. The Rev. Canon Kenneth Kearon, secretary general of the Anglican Communion, is the secretary to ACC meetings.Episcopal Church member Hicks, who has served on the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council, is attending the last ACC meeting of her term.Jennings, who is also president of the House of Deputies, recently completed a term on Executive Council, which elected her in 2010 to fill out of the remainder of Douglas’ clerical term after Douglas had to resign his clerical position when he was elected bishop in October 2009. The Executive Council later elected him as the church’s episcopal, or bishop, member.Jefferts Schori is attending the meeting in her role as a member of the Standing Committee which is meeting in Auckland prior to the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas also is a member of the Standing Committee.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. October 23, 2012 at 6:45 pm Anglican Church throughout the world prays every Sunday for the unity of church as Holy Trinity is united in One True God. Holy Trinity is united because of one common deity of God. If Christ would have preached different views conformed to world views, God the Father would not say about Christ that He is well pleased with His Son, there would have been no unity, no one God.Likewise if 38 provinces of Anglican world some conformed with the world, some not, there could not be unity with broad mission goal without a covenant. If some province says sexual behavior is not factor of receiving God’s grace, or if some says Christ is not the only way to receiving God’s grace for salvation, good works like Mahatma Gandhi, Deli lama could enter into heaven, covenant is not possible.Covenant is not necessary as long all provinces stand on one platform proclaiming same message as Christ proclaimed and fulfilled His father’s will while He was in this world. United, we are strong, divided, we are weak. We have enough divisions among Christian, and we do not need more. May God bless Anglican Communion to proclaim His salvation in one voice? Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Anglican Consultative Council Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET October 24, 2012 at 1:57 am AMEN to that ,brother. Let us please, please focus on the main message, the main model that Christ Jesus set for us. Let us get on with forwarding and implementing that message. MOVE ON. MOVE ON. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 23, 2012 Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Julian Malakar says: Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN October 23, 2012 at 6:27 pm Thanks for such a well written article. I learned much. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (3) Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Kathleen Chipps says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT thomas mauro says: last_img read more

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Esperanzas en el arzobispo entrante y gratitud para el saliente.

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Esperanzas en el arzobispo entrante y gratitud para el saliente. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Por Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 12, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Justin Welby, recién designado arzobispo de Cantórbery, sonríe durante una conferencia de prensa en el Palacio de Lambeth en Londres. Foto de Dylan Martínez /Reuters[Episcopal News Service] La noticia, el 9 de noviembre, de que al Rvdmo. Justin Welby lo nombraban como el próximo arzobispo de Cantórbery ha generado reacciones desde muchos rincones de la Comunión Anglicana, el organismo mundial de 38 provincias a cuya dirección espiritual ha sido llamado el obispo de Durham, Inglaterra, y ex ejecutivo de la industria petrolera.Durante una conferencia de prensa en el Palacio de Lambeth [el mismo] 9 de noviembre, Welby dijo a los medios de información que quería que la Iglesia fuese un lugar donde las personas pudieran discrepar en amor y que él era adverso al lenguaje de la exclusión.Dijo también, como activo usuario de Twitter, que tenía la intención de seguir valiéndose de las redes sociales como medios de comunicación.Como el 105º. Arzobispo, en una sucesión que se extiende por más de 1400 años, Welby asumirá el papel multifacético de líder espiritual de la Comunión Anglicana, Primado de toda Inglaterra y obispo de la Diócesis de Cantórbery, a partir de su entronización el 21 de marzo de 2013.Muchos episcopales han recibido la noticia con agrado, y han expresado su entusiasmo por el nombramiento de Welby, así como su gratitud por el liderazgo del actual arzobispo de Cantórbery durante los últimos 10 años.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori dijo estar “encantada” con la noticia, y añadió que Welby “aporta el conocimiento de los inmensos desafíos del mundo en que la Comunión anglicana procura actuar en el servicio de la misión restauradora y reconciliadora de Dios”.Welby tiene experiencia de las iglesias en varias partes de la Comunión Anglicana, “lo cual le resultará útil”, dijo Jefferts Schori, que regresó recientemente de Nueva Zelanda de participar en una reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, el principal organismo que diseña los planes de acción de la Comunión.“Doy gracias por este nombramiento y por su disposición a aceptar este trabajo, en el cual sus dones de reconciliación y discernimiento quedarán sobradamente demostrados”, y agregó: “Que Dios bendiga su ministerio, proteja a su familia y le brinde consuelo en medio de los difíciles criterios y decisiones que ha de tomar a solas”.La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidenta de la Cámara de Diputados, quien también representó a la Iglesia Episcopal en la reunión del CCA, dijo a ENS que ella salía de todas las reuniones internacionales de anglicanos a las que había asistido con la misma convicción: en su mayoría, las personas en la Comunión Anglicana estaban deseosas “de trabajar juntas por la causa del evangelio, independientemente de nuestras diferencias sobre aspectos teológicos específicos.“Necesitamos un arzobispo de Cantórbery que quiera facilitar esa cooperación y que aliente las alianzas que aún están por nacer”.Welby “es tenido en gran estima” por los episcopales que lo conocen bien, dijo Jennings.“Como árbitro de conflictos, ha demostrado extraordinario valor y un talento inusual en persuadir a personas, con diferencias mucho mayores de las que se dan dentro de la Comunión Anglicana, a trabajar juntas y a reconciliarse”, añadió. “Esto me da esperanzas de que sea la persona adecuada para este momento difícil en la historia de la Comunión Anglicana”.Citan el mérito de su variada experienciaLos obispos de la Iglesia de Inglaterra son nombrados en lugar de ser electos, [mediante un proceso] en el cual los 16 miembros de la Comisión de Nominaciones de la Corona somete dos nombres —un candidato favorito y un segundo candidato— a la oficina del Primer Ministro del Reino Unido, quien luego busca la aprobación del monarca británico, que es el supremo gobernador de la Iglesia de Inglaterra.Antes de su ordenación al presbiterado en 1992, Welby estudio derecho e historia en la Universidad de Cambridge y luego pasó 11 años como ejecutivo de la industria petrolera. Después de una década en el ministerio parroquial, fue nombrado canónigo residente, y más tarde subdeán de la catedral de Coventry. Fue deán de la catedral de Liverpool de 2007 a 2011.Como obispo de Durham, la cuarta sede en orden jerárquico de la Iglesia de Inglaterra, a la cual fue consagrado en octubre de 2011, Welby accedió automáticamente a un escaño en la Cámara de los Lores.El obispo Pierre Whalon, de la Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa, calificó el nombramiento de “acertado”, y citó la “amplia y variada experiencia [de Welby] que le será de utilidad como arzobispo de Cantórbery, tanto dentro de la Iglesia de Inglaterra como en el ámbito mayor de la Comunión Anglicana”.Welby “asumirá un acercamiento imparcial a las provincias de la Comunión”, dijo Whalon a ENS.Aportará también nuevas destrezas útiles al cargo, dijo el Rdo. Marek Zabriskie, rector de la iglesia episcopal de Santo Tomás [St. Thomas’] en Fort Washington, Pensilvania.“Debido a su experiencia como un exitoso empresario de la industria petrolera, creo que él aportará destrezas nuevas al papel del arzobispo de Cantórbery, incluida la planificación estratégica”, le dijo él a ENS. “Esto es algo que se necesita con urgencia en la Iglesia de Inglaterra y en la Comunión Anglicana, y es algo que pocos, si es que algunos, de sus predecesores han llevado antes a la Sede de Cantórbery”.Zabriskie se reunió con Welby durante una reciente visita al Reino Unido como parte de una gira para promover y crear conciencia del Desafío de la Biblia, una iniciativa que alienta y facilita la lectura de toda la Biblia en un año.“El obispo Welby cree firmemente en la lectura regular de la Biblia”, dijo Zabriskie,  “ya que fue así que él tuvo su propia experiencia de fe tarde en la vida: a través de la lectura de las Escrituras y asistiendo a la iglesia de la Santa Trinidad, en Brompton”, el lugar de nacimiento del Curso Alfa, que busca ofrecerle a las personas una medio para explorar la fe cristiana más profundamente.Si bien Welby “se inclina hacia el lado evangélico de la Iglesia,” dijo Zabriskie, el arzobispo designado “parece llevar la designación con mesura, de manera que no lo encasillen, ni en la Iglesia de Inglaterra ni en la Comunión Anglicana, como miembro de sólo una rama particular de la Iglesia más grande”.Cuando Zabriskie le preguntó a  Welby acerca de su candidatura y de que estaba siendo tomado en cuenta para el puesto, respondió: “Es un trabajo difícil… Me apena el hombre que tenga que echarse encima esa responsabilidad. Exigirá muchísima oración y enormes esfuerzos asumir ese papel”.La Rda. Lee Alison Crawford, canóniga misionera de la Iglesia Anglicana Episcopal de El Salvador y ex miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo que ella esperaba que Welby continuara el compromiso de Williams, su predecesor, de abordar los problemas de justicia social y económica.“El arzobispo Williams reconoció que el compromiso en los dominios de lo social y lo político complementa el imperativo del evangelio de vestir al desnudo, alimentar al hambriento, curar al enfermo, visitar al preso y liberar a los cautivos”, dijo a ENS Crawford, sacerdote episcopal con sede en Vermont. “¡Ojalá que el obispo Welby continúe su obra de reconciliación, llevando todas las voces a la mesa para los diálogos difíciles pero esenciales que la Comunión Anglicana debe tener sobre eclesiología, misión, proclamación del evangelio y un mundo cambiante, y cómo esos cambios afectan la comprensión de las personas de lo que significa ser humano y cómo todos estamos interconectados y somos interdependientes”.Crawford dijo que ella espera que Welby alentará a la Comunión Anglicana “a asumir algunos riesgos y a trascender el status quo.“Ruego que el pueda juntar las muchas facetas de la Comunión Anglicana —un organismo rico, diverso y unificado, pero no uniforme— a través de su proclamación del mensaje evangélico del amor para todos de Cristo”.En marzo de 2012, Welby asistió a la reunión de la Cámara de Obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal como invitado internacional. En sus palabras en la clausura de la reunión, dijo que las conversaciones de Indaba en que los obispos habían participado a lo largo de la reunión facilitaron la generosidad y la claridad y que él se iba de la reunión con “una comprensión más profunda de contextos y realidades diferentes”.Después de haberse reunido con Welby y de haber compartido con él un almuerzo durante esa reunión, el obispo Ed Little, de Indiana del Norte, dijo a ENS que el obispo lo había impresionado en varios niveles.“Él es muy perceptivo de los desafíos que enfrenta la Iglesia de Inglaterra y la Comunión Anglicana, y entiende bien tanto los problemas como la complejidad del conflicto”, dijo Little. “Al mismo tiempo, es muy agradable, con un magnífico sentido del humor y una auténtica calidez. Es un cristiano genuinamente comprometido, con una fe profunda y una mirada centelleante. Él será capaz, creo yo, de llegar a los elementos discrepantes dentro de su propia Iglesia y a través de la Comunión”.Ian Douglas, obispo de la Diócesis de Connecticut, que sirve en el CCA y es miembro del Comité Permanente de la Comunión Anglicana, dijo que había encontrado que Welby era “un líder cristiano fiel y previsor dedicado a la misión reconciliadora de Dios.“Su variada experiencia le dará una amplia base a partir de la cual dirigir una Iglesia y una Comunión Anglicana cada vez más diversas y cambiantes en el siglo XXI”, apuntó. “Tengo muchos deseos de trabajar junto al obispo Welby en el Comité Permanente”.Daniel Martins, obispo de la Diócesis de Springfield, dijo que encontraba a Welby “inteligente, de una transparencia cautivadora, políticamente sagaz y con excelente ‘don de gentes’”.“Creo que sus instintos pastorales y administrativos lo convertirán en una bendición para la diócesis y la provincia de Cantórbery, y su capacidad para un trato efectivo con las personas le será de utilidad al asumir los desafíos monumentales que enfrenta la Comunión Anglicana”, dijo Martins —que entrevistó a Welby poco después de que éste participara de la reunión de la Cámara de Obispos— a ENS.Cuando Martins le preguntó como esperaba ser más conocido, por los titulares de los periódicos o de otra manera, Welby le respondió que su mayor ambición “sería no aparecer demasiado en los titulares, ya que dado el estado de la prensa británica eso probablemente significaría que he cometido alguna inmensa estupidez”.Pero si tuviera que aparecer en los titulares, dijo Welby, él esperaba que sería porque la Iglesia había crecido en número y en profundidad espiritual, por trabajar efectivamente con los que se encuentran en los márgenes de la sociedad, añadiendo que a él le gustaría ser conocido “como un obispo a quien le importa Dios y le importa la gente”.Luego del anuncio del 9 de noviembre, Welby declaró: “No creo que nadie pueda estar más sorprendido que yo del resultado de este proceso. Ha sido una experiencia el leer más acerca de mí de lo que yo mismo sabía. Ser nominado a Cantórbery es, al mismo tiempo, abrumador y asombroso. Es abrumador debido a aquellos a los que sigo y la responsabilidad que conlleva. Es asombroso porque es algo que nunca había esperado que ocurriera”.[El arzobispo] Williams dijo en unas declaraciones el 9 de noviembre que  estaba “encantado con el nombramiento… He tenido el privilegio de trabajar estrechamente con [Welby] en varias ocasiones y siempre he salido enriquecido y animado por la experiencia.“Tiene una extraordinaria gama de talentos y es persona de gentileza, paciencia, sabiduría y humor. Aportará a este cargo una rica experiencia pastoral y un agudo sentido de las prioridades internacionales, para la Iglesia y para el mundo. Le deseo —con Carolina y la familia— toda suerte de bendiciones, y espero que la Iglesia de Inglaterra y la Comunión Anglicana compartirán mi regocijo por este nombramiento y lo apoyarán con sus oraciones y su afecto”.Welby y su esposa, Caroline, tienen cinco hijos, entre 16 y 27 años de edad.Entre los mensajes que entraron a raudales de todas partes de la Comunión Anglicana a la noticia del nombramiento de Welby estaba una declaración del Rvdmo. David Chillingworth, primado de la Iglesia Episcopal Escocesa, en el que decía que Welby “aportaba a esta tarea una notable diversidad de dones —espirituales, relacionales e intelectuales— así como su variada experiencia vital”.Gratitud por el liderazgo de WilliamsWelby, de 56 años, sucederá a Williams, que abandonará su cargo a fines de año luego de servir como el 104º. arzobispo de Cantórbery desde febrero de 2003. Williams ha aceptado un nuevo cargo como director del Colegio de la Magdalena, en Cambridge, en el cual comenzará a partir de enero.Williams ha dirigido a la Comunión Anglicana a través de tiempos muy turbulentos, tratando de mantener unidos —a pesar de algunas diferencias teológicas y culturales profundas— a los anglicanos en más de 165 países.Durante los últimos 10 años, dijo Whalon, el Obispo Episcopal de Europa, ha llegado a considerar a Williams como un hermano.“El ministerio que él ha ejercido como arzobispo se verá en el futuro, creo yo, con una luz mucho más clara que en la actualidad, y sus contribuciones vitales a la vida y ministerio de la Comunión Anglicana y de la Iglesia de Inglaterra serán reconocidas”, dijo Whalon, quien está radicado en París y supervisa las congregaciones y ministerios de la Iglesia Episcopal en Francia, Bélgica Suiza, Alemania, Italia y Polonia.Williams, como primado de Toda Inglaterra, también dirige congregaciones de la Diócesis en Europa de la Iglesia de Inglaterra.“En nuestras iglesias en Europa hemos orado por él cada domingo, de manera que él se encamina hacia su nuevo ministerio con nuestros mejores deseos”, dijo Whalon.Jennings, la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados llamó a Williams “una persona de oración, profundamente fiel, que sirvió durante una época difícil en la vida de la Comunión”.Durante la reunión del CCA, Jennings dijo que “estaba particularmente impresionada por su pasión por la justicia y la paz y su profundo respeto por la dignidad de todo ser humano.“La Iglesia será bendecida por su continua reflexión teológica y por sus escritos en los próximos años”.De sus varios encuentros con Williams, el obispo Little, de Indiana, dijo que sobresale un recuerdo de los primeros días de la Conferencia de Lambeth 2008 que fueron dedicados a retiro en la Catedral de Cantórbery.“Por dos días los obispos tuvimos la catedral sólo para nosotros —sin turistas— y el arzobispo Rowan nos dirigió en un período de reflexión. Fue una experiencia maravillosamente enriquecedora: encontrar a Cristo, encontrarnos los unos a los otros, reflexionar sobre nuestros ministerios”, explicó Little. “Él ha traído al oficio arzobispal los dones de la enseñanza y el servicio pastoral en nombre del cuerpo de Cristo. En una época contenciosa, él ha luchado por la reconciliación, y se ha entregado incansablemente a ese ministerio. Su amor por Jesús y su devoción por la unidad de la Iglesia son dones por los cuales alabo a Dios”.Williams acaba de regresar de dos semanas en Nueva Zelanda, donde presidió su última reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano.Al preguntarle en una sesión informativa de prensa en la clausura de [la reunión] del CCA sobre las características necesarias del próximo arzobispo de Cantórbery, Williams citó al teólogo protestante suizo Karl Barth: “uno tiene que predicar con la Biblia en una mano y el periódico en la otra”.“Tienes que hacer constantemente referencias cruzadas, diciendo ‘¿cómo en la visión de la humanidad en comunidad que nos presenta la Biblia se localizan estos problemas de pobreza, privación y violencia y conflicto?’”, dijo Williams. “Y uno tiene que usar lo que lee en el periódico para inducir y dirigir las preguntas que le hace a la Biblia. De manera que yo creo que alguien que le guste leer la Biblia y que le guste leer el periódico tendría un buen comienzo”.Josephine Hicks, representante laica de la Iglesia Episcopal ante el CCA, dijo que el legado permanente de Williams sería “que la Comunión anglicana se mantuviera unida a pesar de las profundas divisiones que amenazaran dividirla durante la mayor parte del tiempo que él estuvo en el cargo”.Un legado igualmente importante, dijo ella, es el regreso de la Conferencia de Lambeth a su propósito original de consulta, culto, oración y desarrollo de relaciones” en lugar de [un organismo] para tomar decisiones políticamente motivadas. Estoy encantada de que la última reunión del CCA se centrara en los problemas de paz y justicia, de la Biblia en la vida de la Iglesia, de Indaba Continuo y la misión, más bien que en temas divisivos”.El obispo Douglas de Connecticut definió como “un increíble privilegio y un gozo” trabajar al lado de Williams en el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano y como miembro del Grupo Organizador de la Conferencia de Lambeth 2008.“Le doy gracias a Dios por la dádiva del arzobispo Rowan”, dijo. “Él ha dirigido la Comunión Anglicana y la Iglesia de Inglaterra desde un lugar de profunda oración, de profunda sabiduría y de espíritu generoso”.Bajo el liderazgo de Welby, dijo Hicks, ella espera que la Comunión Anglicana “continuará avanzando [en el camino de] la misión y el ministerio, sin ignorar las dificultades ni los temas divisivos, pero discutiéndolos de manera que nos ayuden a comprendernos mutuamente y a aprender los unos de los otros y a acercarse a un consenso más bien que a tomar decisiones con ganadores y perdedores —decisiones que marginarían a un ‘lado’ o a al otro”.La transición de Williams a Welby, apuntó Zabriskie, significa “reemplazar un teólogo liberal católico de primer orden, que posee una memoria casi fotográfica…con un evangélico, que llegó tarde a la fe cristiana, que es casi completamente desconocido como teólogo…y a quien se le conoce en primer lugar y sobre todo como administrador y pensador estratégico con una sólida comprensión de las finanzas y un don para la diplomacia y la reconciliación.“Sus dones podrían ser precisamente los que necesitamos en este momento, pero sólo el tiempo lo dirá.– Matthew Davies es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LAcenter_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

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Prayers offered after killing of Roman Catholic nuns in Yemen

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Mar 7, 2016 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Tags Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [Anglican Communion News Service] Four Roman Catholic nuns and 12 other staff and residents at a care home for the elderly in the Yemeni port city of Aden were killed on March 4 in an attack that has been blamed on Daesh. The nuns were members of the Missionaries of Charity, the order founded by Mother Teresa of Calcutta.Anglican Bishop of Cyprus and the Gulf Michael Lewis has expressed concern following the killing.A Reuters news agency reports that four attackers told a guard they were visiting their mother before storming the home, opening fire with rifles. The guard was killed along with two nuns from Rwanda, one from Kenya and one from India. Two Yemeni women staff and eight elderly residents were also killed. Reports say that the victims were tied up before being killed.A Roman Catholic priest who has been missing since the attack, is thought to be being held captive by the assailant, according to the Agence France-Presse (AFP) news agency.“According to our information, the extremists who attacked the elderly care home in Aden have kidnapped priest Tom Uzhunnalil, a 56-year-old Indian, who was taken to an unknown location,” a Yemeni security official told AFP. “We are aware that no group has yet claimed the criminal attack. . . but information points to the involvement of Daesh,” the anonymous source said.Lewis said that the home cared for around 70 or 80 old elderly people, many of whom were found destitute on the streets.“Doubtless the murderers are from the pernicious ultra-fundamentalist fanatical puritan strand of Islam that encompasses [Daesh] and takes inspiration from the Wahhabi sect,” Lewis said. “Their actions will be met with revulsion by true Muslims, especially native Adenis, whose respect for the works of charity and service by Christians in their city is great.“Hearing of these killings in the middle of the season of Lent, those of us who have often visited the sisters and prayed with them will reflect that all Christians are called to walk with Christ the way of the cross, and that that Way is none other than the way of glory and the gate of heaven.“We join [Roman Catholic] Bishop Paul Hinder [of Southern Arabia], the Christians of the Yemen, and all who know God to be the God of mercy and compassion in praying for the eternal repose of the souls of these faithful departed servants of the Lord.”In a statement, the Vatican’s Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, said that “His Holiness Pope Francis was shocked and profoundly saddened to learn of the killing of four Missionaries of Charity and twelve others at a home for the elderly in Aden. He sends the assurance of his prayers for the dead and his spiritual closeness to their families and to all affected from this act of senseless and diabolical violence.“He prays that this pointless slaughter will awaken consciences, lead to a change of heart, and inspire all parties to lay down their arms and take up the path of dialogue. In the name of God, he calls upon all parties in the present conflict to renounce violence, and to renew their commitment to the people of Yemen, particularly those most in need, whom the Sisters and their helpers sought to serve.“Upon everyone suffering from this violence, the Holy Father invokes God’s blessing, and in special ways he extends to the Missionaries of Charity his prayerful sympathy and solidarity.” Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Prayers offered after killing of Roman Catholic nuns in Yemen Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

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Letter from Presiding Bishop, President of House of Deputies

first_imgLetter from Presiding Bishop, President of House of Deputies ‘Jesus tells us to love God and love our neighbor as ourselves’ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK June 29, 2016 at 10:59 am Please don’t assume that I don’t relate with transgender folks and am somehow blind to the issue. I have those connections and know the issue at hand. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Doug Desper says: Channing Smith says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 30, 2016 at 8:25 pm I would like someone in some church, especially a very liberal one, to come out in force against the discrimination against fat people, esp. fat women. I scan all articles to see if they are fat positive. The answer is usually no. There is a caste system regarding obesity. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Ann Ely says: Submit an Event Listing Stuart Lauters says: Melinda Sykes says: Comments (33) June 30, 2016 at 7:45 pm Thank you, Bishop Curry, for your leadership in turning our attention Christ-ward, as uncomfortable as that can be for us sometimes. I am the rector of a suburban church south of Seattle that is rapidly becoming more urban. I had ordered a rainbow flag for Pride weekend but it arrived too late so I have been wondering when might be the best time to add it to our flag-pole. You have helped me make up my mind. The flag will flying on Sunday morning! Catherine Cheek says: Helen Bell says: June 28, 2016 at 8:51 pm So why does the Church still allow separate bathrooms in the parishes ? Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Jun 28, 2016 Doug Desper says: July 2, 2016 at 5:15 pm In Reflection and Respect for All, I must recall during my/our family visit to Europe(1958) and to Paris the Eiffel Tower Restaurant in unisex bathrooms as I was leaving my stall I saw my father leaving the end stall–and we both smiled in this unique/unusual encounter/experience—when are Americans going to grow up/mature to our worldly/global social dynamics rather than being still caught in arrogant,superpower politics?? Yes as Episcopalians we consider ourselves as progressive and perhaps more intellectual than some other denominations … but then one can start to wonder… at the other end of our selective compassionate mode(according to political demands) when will we acknowledge the cruel Israel/U.S. occupation of Palestinian lands by Israel Military supported by US Taxpayers $Billions/annually and sophisticated weaponry!! God Help Us All. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET June 28, 2016 at 10:59 pm We have never allowed our young children or grandchildren (male or female) to go to a restroom alone. It has nothing to do with the biological gender and/or gender identification of others, & the possibility of the children being sexually abused by them. It has to do with placing vulnerable children in an unsupervised situation with adults who are strangers. So to my way of thinking, following this example would shoot down the expressed concern for “the safety of women & children”. And as a woman, I feel I am more vulnerable to violence in the parking lot of any mall or large box store than I am in a bathroom inside a store, library, etc. In terms of safety, I think this complaint is a non-issue. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Doug Desper says: Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Helen Bell says: June 28, 2016 at 5:40 pm Doug, you obviously have never spoken with a transgender person about the fear they deal with every day when using public restrooms. I have. To say that they are just fine despite this law proves that you don’t know the fear of still having female genitalia but otherwise living as a man and expecting to be beaten up by the men in the men’s room or by the spouses of the women in the ladies’ room if you use either one of those.And many transgender people chose not to have sexual reassignment surgery for a variety of reasons. This is especially true for those who are in a stable, loving relationship. One transgender person I know lives as a male, has had a double mastectomy and takes hormones, but chooses not to have a penis created. All of his current IDs list him as male, but the state of his birth will not change his gender on his birth certificate unless he has the genital surgery. He’s lived as a male for many years, is happily employed and happily married, but his birth certificate still says female because of government stupidity. Which bathroom should he use? Featured Jobs & Calls Human Sexuality, Doug Desper says: June 28, 2016 at 2:22 pm Maybe Doug would like to pay for the surgeries for all those who can’t yet afford it or for the teens who are not yet ready for the actual sex change. June 28, 2016 at 5:08 pm Wouldn’t it be simpler to just carry on using restrooms that were designed for your particular personal plumbing, regardless of how you identify yourself to the world outside the bathroom? I must be missing something. June 28, 2016 at 6:51 pm Thank you, Bishop Curry, for being firm in your faith in the totality of God’s love. My cradle church in Columbia, South Carolina, continues to preach and act as if God’s love was limited and selective. I have members of my family who are gay and have asked the church to welcome them in the fullness of God’s love. The Dean has refused. I have found three other churches in Saluda, NC; Edisto Island, SC and even Columbia SC who understand God’s love and who do not discriminate on the base of sexual orientation, and I am enjoying supporting those loving churches in all ways I can. Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. June 28, 2016 at 4:46 pm Thank you for standing up and speaking out. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Davis Dassori says: June 28, 2016 at 4:49 pm I find North Carolina’s law to be incredibly legalistic and unkind. Who wants to have to prosecute someone who broke this law? Is this the best use of tax dollars? There are stalls in the Women’s Bathrooms anyway. It seems like this is such an over-reaction. What would Jesus do? He broke most of the cultural laws of his day that were barriers to inclusion: eating with prostitutes and tax collectors; healing and eating on the sabbath; and his regard for the laws of the temple. When he healed the leper in Mark 1:41 the original text says that he was “moved with anger” and then healed him. The anger wasn’t at the leper, but the Temple laws which labeled him as unclean and kept him out of the community. In my own mind, I can’t justify North Carolina’s law. It just doesn’t line up with the faith that I know. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA June 29, 2016 at 9:37 am So, does that mean in N. C. we need to carry our birth certificate? I also wonder who is going to check? Rector Albany, NY June 28, 2016 at 11:48 pm I’m sure Jesus said something confirming seperate but equal…hmmm, can’t seem to find it anywhere. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Wayne Helmly says: June 30, 2016 at 10:01 am Melinda, you reference search results discussing bathroom molestations by transgender people. Can you please provide these cites? Can you please also provide statistics showing that molestation is perpetrated more frequently by transgender people than by cisgender people? I’m not buying it.As for why this matters – there are lots of situations of people who are biologically male but dressing and identifying as female being assaulted in the men’s room. Richard Bidwell says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem June 28, 2016 at 5:24 pm Thank you Bishop Curry for this courageous pastoral letter and response to the deplorable situation in North Carolina. I am not aware of reports of dangerous behavior in bathrooms from transgender people using the bathroom in which they feel most comfortable. I am so thankful to have a Presiding Bishop who boldly speaks to the fear that gets mobilized in people in a ways that lead us to act in hateful ways to our neighbors, and who encourages us not to surrender to such fear. You remind us that Jesus calls us to love—even that which we do not understand and those whom we may fear because of difference. We need all the help we can get overcoming our fear and acting in loving ways toward our neighbors, and your letter provides such help. Melinda Sykes says: Doug Desper says: The Rev. John Forman says: June 28, 2016 at 12:49 pm North Carolina’s new privacy and security law validates the reality of the two sexes, as it makes a decent — and reasonable — accommodation for people who wish to change from one sex to the other.The law does declare that people must use the bathrooms that match their “biological sex.” That’s the part of the law that the media usually gets correct. That’s the starting place of the ax-grinding by TV-ready victims who want to push a case for discrimination.But here’s the part of HB2 that is often left out: The law carefully defines “biological sex” as “the physical condition of being male or female, which is stated on a person’s birth certificate” AND the law also then allows people their freedom to choose identity and act as they wish — but they must go through their final medical procedure before fully identifying. This, apparently, galls some people to the point of their feeling insulted. A 2005 state law allows people to change the sex on their birth certificates once they’ve undergone medical procedures, reading, (b) A new certificate of birth shall be made by the State Registrar when … (4) A written request from an individual is received by the State Registrar to change the sex on that individual’s birth record because of sex reassignment surgery, if the request is accompanied by a notarized statement from the physician who performed the sex reassignment surgery or from a physician licensed to practice medicine who has examined the individual and can certify that the person has undergone sex reassignment surgery.So, the law sets up a process that allows transgenders to use their preferred bathrooms.The supposedly anti-transgender law is actually a compromise law that allows the few transgenders in the state to use bathrooms reserved for people of the other sex — once they’ve gone through the medical procedures to actually become transgender. And it also protects sexual privacy for everyone else — a subject mainly left out of any consideration. It IS a reality that disturbed and predatory people are going to take advantage of this situation. Some store owners and employees now watch fully bearded men walk into multi-stalled Women’s Restrooms – and are afraid to confront due to being labeled as a bigot. If your 10 year old daughter slipped away from shopping to go to a multi-stalled Women’s Room wouldn’t common sense prevail to be alarmed at a bearded male following behind? Societal re-engineering is re-creating common sense to be viewed as bigotry.We need to stop letting TV-ready victims do our thinking for us.center_img beverly johnson says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 28, 2016 at 6:28 pm How anyone can read this letter and respond at length with commentary about bathrooms and human anatomy is beyond me. The letter is about the teachings of Jesus Christ and what those of us who are members of the Episcopal Church are to make of those teachings in how we treat others. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Jane Tillman says: Kerry Nesbit says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA June 28, 2016 at 4:46 pm There is no problem if one uses a single person, any-gender restroom. The issue is larger multi-stall restrooms. Is it OK for your daughters to be alone in there and be met by someone who is obviously male? How about 4 men in the bathroom with a 10 year old girl? A quick Google search shows that such is happening because a loophole has been found. The sensibility grid didn’t catch on to that possibility. How on earth did people use public restrooms until they were recently given an option to pick the one that they identify with? Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, June 28, 2016 at 8:48 pm Thank you for your courage and commitment, Bishop Curry. You are one of the people, through your actions, who give me hope. Blessings on you [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have written the following letter to the Episcopal Church.June 28, 2016Dear People of God in the Episcopal Church:We all know that some things in holy Scripture can be confusing, hard to understand, or open to various ways of understanding. But some essential teachings are clear and incontrovertible. Jesus tells us to love God and love our neighbor as ourselves, and he tells us over and over again not to be afraid (Matthew 10:31, Mark 5:36, Luke 8:50, John 14:27).There’s no confusion about what Jesus is telling us, but it often requires courage to embody it in the real world. Again and again, we become afraid, and mired in that fear, we turn against Jesus and one another.This age-old cycle of fear and hatred plays out again and again in our broken world, in sickening and shocking events like the massacre targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in Orlando, but also in the rules we make and the laws we pass. Most recently, we’ve seen fear at work in North Carolina, a state dear to both of our hearts, where a law called the “Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act” has decimated the civil rights and God-given dignity of transgender people and, by extension, drastically curtailed protections against discrimination for women, people of color, and many others. We are thankful for the prayerful and pastoral public leadership of the North Carolina bishops on this law, which is known as House Bill 2.North Carolina is not the only place where fear has gotten the better of us. Lawmakers in other jurisdictions have also threatened to introduce legislation that would have us believe that protecting the rights of transgender people—even a right as basic as going to the bathroom—somehow puts the rest of us at risk.This is not the first time that the segregation of bathrooms and public facilities has been used to discriminate unjustly against minority groups. And just as in our painful racial past, it is even being claimed that the “bathroom bills,” as they are sometimes called, ensure the safety of women and children—the same reason so often given to justify Jim Crow racial segregation.But we believe that, as the New Testament says, “perfect love casts out fear.” On June 10, the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church stood against fear and for God’s love by passing a resolution that reaffirms the Episcopal Church’s support of local, state and federal laws that prevent discrimination based on gender identity or gender expression and voices our opposition to all legislation that seeks to deny the God-given dignity, the legal equality, and the civil rights of transgender people.The need is urgent, because laws like the one in North Carolina prey on some of the most vulnerable people in our communities—some of the very same people who were targeted in the Orlando attack. In a 2011 survey, 78 percent of transgender people said that they had been bullied or harassed in childhood; 41 percent said they had attempted suicide; 35 percent had been assaulted, and 12 percent had suffered a sexual assault. Almost half of transgender people who responded to the survey said they had suffered job discrimination, and almost a fifth had lost housing or been denied health care due to their gender identity or expression.In keeping with Executive Council’s resolution, we are sending a letter to the governor and members of the North Carolina General Assembly calling on them to repeal the “Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act.” When legislation that discriminates against transgender people arises in other places, we will also voice our opposition and ask Episcopalians to join us. We will also support legislation, like a bill recently passed in the Massachusetts state legislature, that prevents discrimination of all kinds based on gender identity or gender expression.As Christians, we bear a particular responsibility to speak out in these situations, because attempts to deny transgender people their dignity and humanity as children of God are too often being made in the name of God. This way of fear is not the way of Jesus Christ, and at these times, we have the opportunity to demonstrate our belief that Christianity is not a way of judgment, but a way of following Jesus in casting out fear.In the face of the violence and injustice we see all around us, what can we do? We can start by choosing to get to know one another. TransEpiscopal, an organization of transgender Episcopalians and their allies, has posted on their website a video called “Voices of Witness:  Out of the Box” that can help you get to know some transgender Episcopalians and hear their stories. Integrity USA, which produced the video, and the Chicago Consultation are two other organizations working for the full inclusion of LGBT people in the church. Their websites also have online materials that you can use to learn more about the stories of transgender Christians and our church’s long journey to understand that they are children of God and created in God’s image.When we are born anew through baptism, we promise to respect the dignity of every human being. Today, transgender people and, indeed, the entire LGBT community, need us to keep that promise. By doing so, we can bear witness to the world that Jesus has shown us another way—the way of love.Faithfully,The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry                              The Rev. Gay Clark JenningsPresiding Bishop and Primate                                 President, House of Deputies Rector Tampa, FL Wayne Helmly says: Kathy Gray says: Submit a Press Release June 28, 2016 at 5:43 pm While we are at it, the bathroom laws are only one part of HB2. HB2 doesn’t just repeal the existing civil-rights ordinances protecting the LGBT community; it bars any locality or agency from enacting new ones. It also limits how people pursue claims of discrimination because of race, religion, color, national origin, biological sex or handicap in state courts. The law also means a city or county cannot set a minimum wage standard for private employers. What many people don’t realize is that this law takes away the self-determination of local communities (something that has been a major trend with the current NC legislature). This includes a town’s ability to declare anti-discrimination laws in, say, the hiring of Mexican immigrants of which there are many in my area. It is not just about LGBT bathroom rights, though I object to that provision as much as I object to the other ones. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry June 29, 2016 at 1:08 am The HB2 bill/law is perceived to be discriminatory and in violation of certain LGBT rights by many. However, as people try to be sensitive to LGBT people, the heterosexual community suffers discrimination and violation of the very same certain rights. Now that certain transgenders have insisted on being allowed to use the ladies public restroom, perverts and predators of women and young girls are gaining access, unquestioned, under the guise of being transgender. To which I would think appall the LGBT community and would generate an out cry from them equally as loud as their out cry of HB2. There have been many reports, documented and accessible via internet search, of men accessing the ladies room under the guise of transgender to either do harm or violate the privacy of the women and young girls within. For many, it truly is a matter of safety not phobia or discrimination. For crying out loud, non-heterosexuals are more accepted today than 5-20 years ago. There has to be a better solution that protects and accommodates both non-heterosexuals and heterosexuals. I personally know non-heterosexuals that would never want another to possibly be put in potential danger because of their sexual preference or sexual identity. Too often our society gets caught up in trying to make sure no one suffers from discrimination that we wind up jeopardizing the safety of all. I hope and pray God will help us all to reach a solution that respects everyone and protects everyone. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH June 29, 2016 at 10:57 am Kerry — From the Letter:“Most recently, we’ve seen fear at work in North Carolina, a state dear to both of our hearts, where a law called the “Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act” has decimated the civil rights and God-given dignity of transgender people and, by extension, drastically curtailed protections against discrimination for women, people of color, and many others”. “This is not the first time that the segregation of bathrooms and public facilities has been used to discriminate unjustly against minority groups”. The door to discuss the law was opened by the authors of this Letter. The Letter places accusations implying injustice because a law was created to try to make sense of this situation. It also dredges up every type of injustice and conflates those to this issue which is by itself unique — and along the way accuses the lawmakers of reviving Jim Crow. That is baseless and ridiculous.It would be nice to address issues without such accusations, conflations, and without larding every abuse of the past onto the issue. Accusing others of bigotry and racism is an effective way of shutting down a reasoned argument. Steve Colburn and Rod Smith, Faithful Servants says: July 8, 2016 at 8:00 am Dr Lund: It seems that the modern definition of Episcopalian Progressiveness is to meld and conflate every social issue onto the grid of Jim Crow (or some other injustice), white privilege, or worse, equating the Baptismal Covenant’s injunction to “respect the dignity of all” as being the same as giving whatever another demands. So, no not all of us — maybe not even most of us really – care to be associated as “progressive”. As for our Church being more intellectual, my sense is that such pride goes before a fall. We, as a denomination, are microscopic in America. Other Christians are intellectual, and one could even argue, perhaps more so. Scriptural illiteracy is far too common among us – which is odd among a Church that used to value the Reformation. Submit a Job Listing June 29, 2016 at 1:55 pm “For crying out loud, non-heterosexuals are more accepted today than 5-20 years ago.” Wow… In other words, transgender citizens, be happy with what heterosexuals have condescended to give you and be quiet. Thanks be to God for church leadership that will not be quiet. For leadership that really does take our Baptismal Covenant seriously by striving for justice and peace among all people, and respecting the dignity of every human being. I encourage everyone to watch the video “Voices of Witness: Out of the Box,” which the letter recommends. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA June 28, 2016 at 4:15 pm We’ve been letting our 10-year-old sons go into men’s rooms since the invention of plumbing. Why does equal access put our daughters at greater risk? Ronald Davin says: Doug Desper says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 June 28, 2016 at 4:32 pm This law was a response to an over-reaching local ordinance that would have required an unnecessary burden on businesses — and public civility — which established how one perceives themselves (“identity”) as the permission to use any bathroom facility that one chooses. In the end, people will go where they have always gone — but to advocate for ordinances that permit one to “go where you identify” is ludicrous. The loopholes and consequences are potentially devastating. If we can remove the grid of liberal sensibilities for a moment and think about those consequences we would instantly see that the real ones being discriminated against are families and children who must use multi-stall restrooms. Until this brouhaha people have gone to the bathroom for decades without having to be affirmed for their choice of the door. The law isn’t going to be enforced based on surgeries, birth certificate checks, or physicals at the door of a multi-stall restroom. The Transgendered community is safe in that regard, so they are liberty to move about freely without fear of checks — which has never happened. It is an honor system without teeth — but it does accomplish a legal restraint of predatory opportunists who will claim a false identity in order to break the law and invade personal space to abuse or attack others.The loophole has been found and is being exploited — hence the law based on “gender” rather than “identity”. July 7, 2016 at 10:01 am I am very grateful for indoor plumbing and content to use whichever bathroom secular culture assigns me regardless of my sex or gender. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 29, 2016 at 1:14 am Very good question. I’d like to know as well. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Frank Rggio-Preston says: June 29, 2016 at 3:57 pm Thank you, Presiding Bishop Curry. About children in the bathroom, there have been a few incidents of child molestation in our area branch of the library. The perpetrators were heterosexual. At our Vigil for the Orlando victims, a transgender girl spoke on this matter. After the Vigil, I talked with this woman, and she was so nice, even though ‘God-fearing’ bigots were abusive to her. Kelly Rabin says: Anthony Price says: Dr. Erna Lund says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Kenneth Knapp says: June 28, 2016 at 7:40 pm Thank you PB Curry and HOD President Jennings for reminding us that NC’s “Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act” is not about bathrooms. It is not about privacy. It is not about security. This law is about discrimination. It is not “decent and reasonable” in any way, as has been asserted in earlier comments. I believe it is antithetical to the Gospel that Jesus preached. He came to proclaim good news to the poor, to proclaim freedom for the prisoners, to set the oppressed free,to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.” June 28, 2016 at 7:12 pm Dear Bishop Curry,Thank your words of witness to Christ Jesus message. What can we do to remove the impediment of our own Bishops Diocesan who refuse to extend God’s love, through the body of the Church, to our LGBT brothers and sisters in Christ. Still waiting for the acceptance and acknowledgment of our 2011 Civil marriage in the Diocese here in SW Florida! Praise be to the most high. The Rev. Susan G. Astarita says: Rector Washington, DC President of the House of Deputies, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Nina Smith says: last_img read more

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Farewell service for the Archbishop of Wales

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] The longest-serving Archbishop in the Anglican Communion, the Most Rev. Barry Morgan, is stepping down this week as leader of the Church in Wales, as he marks his 70th birthday. More than 500 people attended a farewell service at Llandaff Cathedral in Cardiff, in celebration and thanksgiving for the contribution made by Morgan during his nearly 14 years as archbishop and 17 as bishop of Llandaff. In his  sermon, Morgan told the congregation it had been an “enormous privilege” to have served them and he thanked people for their support. He, in turn, was thanked warmly for all his ministry and given a standing ovation.Full article. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL January 30, 2017 at 5:55 pm Why isn’t the church coming out against our President’s lies and false information. We need to watch his pick for the judiciary. Germany faced the same problems and the clergy and church did nothing. Let us be sensitive to what is happening. The national church should give leadership to the smaller churches.Barbara Reynolds, Cookeville, TN 38506. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Barbara Reynolds says: Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Farewell service for the Archbishop of Wales This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska By ACNS staffPosted Jan 30, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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Episcopal Church raises concerns on Trump policy enforcing provisions of…

first_img Rector Washington, DC By David PaulsenPosted Apr 22, 2019 Curate Diocese of Nebraska [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations is raising concerns about Trump administration plans to start enforcing a long-neglected provision of the U.S. embargo against Cuba.General Convention has passed several resolutions over the past decade calling for an end to the Cuba embargo, an issue that took on new urgency last year when the Diocese of Cuba was welcomed back into The Episcopal Church. In particular, The Episcopal Church urges “an end to provisions that hamper the mission of the Church in Cuba and that contribute to the suffering of the Cuba people,” the Office of Government Relations said in a statement released April 18.Holy Trinity Cathedral, Havana, Cuba. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThat statement responded to the Trump administration’s decision to enforce Title III of the Helms-Burton Act, which will allow U.S. citizens, including naturalized Cubans, to sue foreign companies that may be profiting from use of property seized by the Cuban government in 1959. That provision has been waived by every U.S. president since the Helms-Burton Act was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1996.Trump administration officials argue that ending the waiver of Title III will put pressure on the Cuban government over its support for embattled Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. National Security Adviser John Bolton, who announced this change last week, has called Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua a “troika of tyranny.”“The United States looks forward to watching each corner of this sordid triangle of terror fall,” Bolton said in his April 17 announcement.This harder stance toward Cuba comes after former President Barack Obama sought to improve relations with the island country. Obama, who in 2016 became the first U.S. president to visit communist Cuba, oversaw the easing of travel restrictions and restoring of diplomatic relations. The United States reopened its embassy in Havana, and Cuba reopened its embassy in Washington, D.C.In 2015, General Convention passed a resolution hailing such examples of progress and calling for an outright end to the embargo against Cuba. It further directed the Office of Government Relations to work “toward lifting aspects of the embargo that impede The Episcopal Church’s partnership with The Episcopal Church in Cuba.”Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio leads the recessional following the Feb. 28 Eucharist opening the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s 110th General Synod. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThree years later, in July 2018, General Convention passed the resolution that readmitted the Diocese of Cuba, and Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio took her seat in the House of Bishops.The thaw in relations between the two countries, however, has been in doubt since President Donald Trump took office in 2017 vowing to reverse Obama’s policy toward Cuba. The Trump administration’s announcement this month raised alarms over the prospect that messy legal battles would ensnare companies from countries that do not have embargoes against Cuba, from the European Union to Canada. Some also questioned whether this U.S. policy change would be effective in pressuring Maduro.“How do you allow lawsuits against a country like Canada who has been supportive of efforts in Venezuela and maintain Canada as an ally?” Pedro Freyre, a Miami attorney who advises U.S. companies, told the Miami Herald.The Office of Government Relations, in its statement, also emphasized the potential human cost of such policy changes.“Enacting Title III will cause U.S.-Cuba relations to deteriorate further, and it will hurt the Cuban people and economy,” the office said. “We therefore reiterate our call for an end to the embargo and reassert our commitment to strengthening relations between the Cuban and American people.”The Anglican presence in Cuba dates to 1871. In 1966, The Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops expelled the Cuban diocese in response to the Cuban Revolution and the United States’ policy. Episcopal schools in Cuba had been closed and appropriated, and many clergy and their families were displaced.The diocese’s readmission in 2018 was made possible partly because the Cuban government had grown less restrictive toward churches. The U.S. government’s policy, meanwhile, had become less predictable under Trump, church leaders said.The Episcopal Church of Cuba today has 46 congregations serving about 10,000 members and their communities. Its reintegration into The Episcopal Church is expected to be complete by 2020.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Latin America Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Faith & Politics, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cuba, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church raises concerns on Trump policy enforcing provisions of Cuba embargo Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

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Tractor Supply coming to Apopka in 2017

first_img Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Apopka Voice has obtained confirmation that Tractor Supply Company plans to build a new, 19,000 square foot store in Apopka.“Tractor Supply Company is excited about being a new member of the Apopka business community,” said Rob Hoskins, spokesperson for the Tennessee-based company. “The soft opening is tentatively set for June 24, 2017.”Hoskins continued; “As a growth minded company, Tractor Supply Company (TSC) is always looking for potential new store locations that are a good fit as far as the target market is concerned. Concerning the location in Apopka, this is especially true in that the area was attractive due to the part-time and hobby farmers, and horse owners in the area. The TSC product category expertise includes lawn and garden, and animal care products that service the needs of these customers. The Apopka Tractor Supply store location will employ between 12-17 full and part-time team members. The location in Apopka will have approximately 19,000 square feet.”TSC has also confirmed the location of the new store will be 180 West 1st Street in Apopka.The Apopka Voice first reported on this in May.  Use this link to read more about the location.Tractor Supply provided this store front image: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSTractor Supply Company Previous articleOn This Day: Japanese prime minister requests summit with FDRNext articleThree Tropical Systems now being tracked Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 last_img read more

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Goodwill offers job resume workshop Thursday

first_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply From the Apopka Job Center at GoodwillThis do-it-yourself résumé workshop is a hands-on workshop designed to help you create a professional résumé to start GETTING RESULTS! You will gain invaluable insight about developing your own successful résumé and you will leave this workshop with actionable results in significantly improving your résumé and overall job search success.Workshop Includes:• Résumé Pre-work to make best use of workshop time (REQUIRED)• Resources and sites to continuously improve your resume• Developing your Summary, Experience, & Transferable Skills• How to target & focus your résumé towards your goals• Sample résumé formatsSeating is limited so please call and pre-register at 407-720-3300Thursday, July 20, 2017 10:00am – 12:00pmApopka Job Connection Center1312 E. Semoran Blvd.Apopka, FL 32703407-720-3300#goodwillcfl #goodwillapopkajcc #buildinglivesthatwork Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSGoodwillJobsResume Previous articleApopka Burglary ReportNext articleSolar Bears leading goal scorer back for 2017-18 Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more

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