Calgary Stampede

first_imgThe Calgary Stampede, despite battling some wet weather, set another all-time attendance record last week drawing 1.12 million people. An Alberta Peace chuck wagon driver was among the $100,000 first prize winners on the final day yesterday.Forty-one year-old Hugh Sinclair is still batting 1.000 in Calgary, as he surprised the veteran Kelly Sutherland and took the Rangeland Derby championship heat last night. He also took the day money from the #1 one barrel position with a time of 1:14.56, to capture his fourth Calgary championship race in as many tries.Meanwhile, Fort St. John’s Delano Kjos earlier won the Novice Saddle Bronc title for the second year in a row. He had a combined score of 154 in his final two rides.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Trojans sloppy in 85-70 defeat

first_imgIn a nearly meaningless game with a showdown for second place in the Pacific-10 Conference looming Saturday, No. 23 USC was ripe for a letdown. Even the Las Vegas oddsmakers saw it, making host Washington a favorite over the NCAA tournament-bound Trojans. • Photo Gallery: USC vs. Washington SEATTLE – It almost seemed inevitable. The Trojans came out playing uncharacteristically ineffective defense, fought back into the game but played sloppily down the stretch in an 85-70 loss at Washington that equals the team’s worst defeat of the season. “We’re playing for seeding, the coach said, and we never know how the tournament (selection) might go,” USC’s Nick Young said. “We might be shipped out to the East Coast to play against Florida.” Though it won’t impress the NCAA seeding committee, if USC had to lose a game, than this was a good time for it. The Trojans (21-9, 11-6) can still take second place in the Pac-10 by beating Washington State on Saturday in their final regular-season game. USC could also finish as low as fourth if it loses to the Cougars and Stanford beats Arizona. The game going on simultaneously across the state was actually more important to the Trojans. UCLA’s victory in Pullman set up the tiebreaker scenario that would put the Trojans ahead of the Cougars. center_img That might have had something to do with the early lackadaisical effort on defense by USC. The game started getting away toward the end of the first half when Washington (17-12, 7-10) hit 3-pointers on three consecutive possessions. The Huskies made 9 of 13 3-point shots in the first half. When Ryan Appleby hit the third 3-pointer in that series, it sparked a controversy. The shot went up just as the Huskies were called for a foul away from the ball. The referees originally appeared to be waving off the shot, but after a conference, called it good. That set off USC coach Tim Floyd, who ran at the official and got a technical foul. Appleby hit one of two free throws, giving Washington a 44-30 lead. “We put ourselves in a hole early by not defending,” Floyd said. “It wasn’t one of our better defensive efforts. … I thought we didn’t get back defensively with our perimeter players, and we made some real mistakes in terms of location.” Washington’s lead swelled to 17 points early in the second half on a 3-point play by Quincy Pondexter. USC battled back to five points down behind the play of Young, who led the team with 26 points and displayed the wide variety of pro-style offensive moves that could help him leave early for the NBA after the season. Down 70-64, USC turned the ball over on three consecutive possessions. USC’s Lodrick Stewart, a senior who was returning home to the city where he went to high school, then lost the ball on a drive to the basket, down 74-66. Spencer Hawes scored for Washington on the other end and that was the end of USC’s comeback hopes. Though the game didn’t mean much for the Trojans, it did to Stewart. Stewart’s father, Andrew, brothers, Kadeem and Hadeem, and son, Jaylin, were sitting right behind the USC bench. Stewart, who usually does well in front of family members, scored nine points. “It just didn’t go my way tonight,” Stewart said. “This was one I wanted. It’s frustrating to lose this game.” matthew.kredell@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Park blaze beaten back; venues, homes spared

first_imgGRIFFITH PARK – A brush fire that charred more than 800 acres in Griffith Park and threatened some of the city’s most popular landmarks was nearly contained Wednesday, letting firefighters send hundreds of evacuated residents back home. Aided by water-dropping helicopters that flew overnight, firefighters had three-quarters of the blaze surrounded Wednesday evening and expected full containment some time today. “We made great progress … There is no active fire that is still moving, which is good. The wind really cooperated,” said Los Angeles Fire Capt. Rick Godinez. He noted, however, that the lack of precipitation this rainy season has dramatically raised the wildfire risk this year. “It’s a recipe for a good brush fire.” The park and its main attractions – the observatory, the Los Angeles Zoo, golf courses and the Autry National Center – were expected to remain closed at least through today. Officials said a concert scheduled today at the Greek Theatre has been moved to the Gibson Amphitheatre. After a sudden change in wind direction, the fire burned out of control Tuesday evening, racing dangerously close to homes in the Los Feliz area, forcing the evacuation of 200 homes. Towering orange flames also came close to the Greek Theatre and the newly renovated Griffith Observatory. In the end, the fire damaged just one home. Driving away from her apartment near Griffith Park on Tuesday with a box of treasured photos, Lindsay Edwards headed for a friend’s place and kept an eye on the fire. “It looked like Armageddon,” the 23-year-old Edwards said. “Everything was ablaze.” About three-dozen residents spent the night at Marshall High School, where an evacuation center was set up for residents ordered to flee their homes. The evacuation order was lifted Wednesday morning and the center closed in the afternoon. The fire, believed started by a cigarette near one of the park’s golf courses, burned an estimated 817acres in the 4,200-acre park, including the landmark terraced garden, Dante’s View. Helicopter crews continued to fly deep into the narrow canyons, dropping water from Silver Lake reservoir and fire retardant on to the flames. Armed with chain saws, rakes and a water hose, inmates from the county Fire Department’s San Francisquito Camp got to work Wednesday leveling brush and charred tree branches. Overhead, water-dropping aircraft targeted a hot spot along Vista Del Valle Drive, where 10-foot flames licked at a smoldering tree. County Fire Capt. Bill Cyr directed the two crews in orange jumpsuits – 28 men in all – up the steep hillside to finish the job. “The air drops are effective,” he said. “But they won’t get the fire out. You got to have the people. You got to have tools.” The fire hit during animal mating season, sending deer and other creatures fleeing from the flames. Officials said some animals could head into residential neighborhoods. Firefighters from as far away as Santa Barbara arrived Wednesday to relieve exhausted crews who battled the blaze overnight. Tinder-dry conditions caused by record-dry precipitation this winter, along with erratic winds and rough terrain, made the fight especially challenging. An unidentified 20-year-old man was questioned after he was discovered near the ignition point of the fire, on the northern edge of Franklin D. Roosevelt Municipal Golf Course. He suffered second-degree burns on his hands and chest and was being treated Wednesday at the Grossman Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital. Los Angeles Fire Capt. Antoine McKnight said the man was talking with investigators and cited for smoking in a brush-fire area. “We are not prepared to say whether it’s arson or accidental,” McKnight said. Officials said they had sent their information to the District Attorney’s Office. Grant Mudford packed his van with his valuables Tuesday night and then waited at his home. When flames came over a hill just 100feet from his house on Dundee Place, he drove to a friend’s home. He returned around 11p.m. to protect his place from looters and stayed up nearly all night with his dog. “When you have only one-half hour to decide what’s important to you, it’s interesting what you grab,” he said. “The dog was No.1.” Staff Writers Sue Doyle and Eugene Tong contributed to this story. rachel.uranga@dailynews.com (818) 713-3741160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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‘Star Wars’ fans celebrate

first_img“Can I get a large drip and one of those macadamia nut cookies?” he asked.The barista, not missing a beat, handed him his coffee and change. Master Vitas folded the money and slipped it beneath his custom-made Jedi tunic, into the pocket of some khakis bought at Target. Energized with some Starbucks brew, the Force was with him.Nearly 30 years to the day after “Star Wars” first appeared on theater screens, the universe of George Lucas loomed as large as ever throughout the Los Angeles Convention Center. Vitas and thousands of other fans of the fantastical franchise, some diehards from the start like him, others newly minted, turned out Thursday for a preview of Star Wars Celebration IV.The four-day exposition, officially open to the public today, serves as a clearinghouse for all things Star Warsian. Vendors hawk still-in-the-package Lando Calrissian figures and Darth Maul T-shirts and fans pose for pictures and get autographs from luminaries such as Kenny “R2-D2” Baker and Temuera “Jango Fett” Morrison.Everyone likes to kick it with Jango. It made for a scene of unimaginable strangeness, where French Jedis lunched not far from a group of Imperial stormtroopers speaking Portuguese. A chef in a Darth Vader getup, black helmet protruding from beneath a white toque, toted the head of Jar-Jar Binks on a silver platter. The crowd ate that one up.In a cluster of several Princess Leias, Marie Prestin stood out as the Princess Leia. While most opted for the tried-and-true white robe and double cinnamon-bun hairstyle combination, Prestin, a 26-year-old Orange County housewife, chose the provocative slave-to-Jabba-the-Hutt outfit from “Return of the Jedi.” She smiled her way through countless pictures as her more primly attired counterparts chatted in anonymity.Don Bedwell, an Orlando Web designer dressed in the robes of an evil Jedi, captured the scene on his digital camera.“OK,” he said as Prestin posed. “On ‘three.’ And… three!”He snapped the picture early as his associate, Charles Silver, wearing a Jedi master outfit, sneered.“What happened to one and two?” sniffed Silver, described as “an international man of leisure” and also from Orlando. “Oh, I forgot. You’re Sith. You can’t count.”Bedwell, like so many servants of the Dark Side, did not deal well with criticism.“Sure, I can,” he responded. “One, two, then I cut your head off.”Ultimately, he did not feel the need to resort to such violence. Friendly insults sufficed. The two bickering Jedi, with their carefully constructed outfits and weapons, had definitely delved deep into the “Star Wars” spirit, but they had nothing on Bill Deacon, 57, of Fontana.The dairy warehouseman sat through the 17-hour showing of all six films the day before, then slept in before donning his Han Solo pilot’s uniform. Then, with his wife, he drove to the show — in a ’74 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic redesigned to resemble the Millennium Falcon.With the license plate reading “HANCHWY,” he roared down Interstate 10 and pulled into his spot on the show floor. Then he affixed the radar dish, made from a vegetable steamer, to the hood and the cannon, constructed out of a cup-holder and part of a kitty litter can, to the roof.“My wife was looking out the window at it and said, ‘What a piece of junk!’” said Deacon, who’s seen the original film 50 times. “So we called her the Millennium Falcon. I’ve heard of other Millennium Falcon cars, but this is the only one like this.”And that was pure gold to fans such as John Wilson, a 38-year-old printer from Orange. Wearing a Hawaiian-print shirt, shorts and a Darth Vader helmet, he represented himself as a vacationing Sith Lord.Wilson was hooked when he saw the original movie in 1977. When he took his kid to see “The Phantom Menace,” he wept. They share a personal affinity for Yoda, who’s small, yet tough.The show exceeded his lofty expectations.“It’s pure awesomeness,” he said. “I’ve been waiting for this for a long time. There’s just so much stuff with ‘Star Wars’: samurai crap, Shakespeare, tragedy. And look at all these nutbars, man …”brent.hopkins@dailynews.com(818) 713-3738160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! • Photo Gallery: Star Wars Celebration • Video: Star Wars Celebration A GALAXY FAR, FAR AWAY — Jedi Master Bob Vitas had spent a long Thursday engaging fellow knights in conversation and found himself peckish.He made his way through the packed room, looping around galactic senators and Imperial troops. Lightsaber at his side in case of trouble, he stepped up to the bar and spoke.There was no need for Jedi mind tricks.last_img read more

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OLD DONEGAL PHOTOS BEING SNAPPED UP FOR UNIQUE EXHIBITION

first_imgPhoto caption: An old photograph of Kee’s shop, Glenfin Street Ballybofey. The Ballybofey, Stranorlar and District Historical Society is urgently seeking old pictures of the area for an upcoming photo exhibition in the Butt Hall.The deadline is fast approaching for the submission of old photographs for the upcoming exhibition by the Ballybofey, Stranorlar and District Historical Society.The society is looking for copies of any old photographs of people, places or events in the area for the photo exhibition.The event will take place in the exhibition area of the Balor Theatre on Saturday, May 11, to link in with other planned events as part of the Isaac Butt weekend. If you, or anyone you know, have old photographs that would be of interest, then contact Gerard McHugh by Monday, April 22, at his studio on Donegal Street, Ballybofey, on 074 91 32750.Alternatively, you can email old photos, preferably high resolution, to enquiries@gerardmchughphotography.comThe next meeting of the society will take place in the Henderson Hall, Stranorlar on Monday April 22, at 8.00pm.New members are always welcome, for more information please come along to the next meeting or contact the Society Chairperson, Aubrey Oliver.  OLD DONEGAL PHOTOS BEING SNAPPED UP FOR UNIQUE EXHIBITION was last modified: July 26th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BALLY STRANORLAR HISTORICAL SOCIETYphotoslast_img read more

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Council candidates’ stances, issue by issue

first_img Community groups and the chamber should jointly find a permanent spot. He suggested the city pay the county a nominal fee to keep the current location at the county public works yard within the city. Other issues: Growth outside city and its impacts on roads, schools and public safety. The city should aggressively pursue annexation of Stevenson Ranch, Castaic, Westridge and Fair Oaks. He also favors hiring more sheriff’s deputies in narcotics and gang units. Jo Ann Smith Curtis, retired trial attorney: Redeveloping downtown Newhall: “I think there needs to be redevelopment there but I don’t believe they should use eminent domain.” Open space: “I would have voted for it if they put some kind of cap.” Smith said she is interested in promoting another measure. To relieve traffic, developers should put in roads first and have them in place before homes are sold. “We must reduce the growth here.” Canyon Country: “They have been forgotten. They don’t qualify for redevelopment but there are many things they could have.” The community, she said, needs for sheriff’s and fire department services as well as more restaurants and higher-end shopping. Cemex: “I think we need to oppose that vigorously. The site would be terrible for roads, pollution in the air.” Supports the city’s efforts. Elected mayor: “No, I think it’s just another layer of government. The candidate that has the most money will win, generally.” Replacing Smyth: Ambivalent, but suggests appointment over election to save money. Shelter: “Absolutely. It should be put out to the citizens to get input on where they would want it.” Issues: Housing and development. “It has a domino effect on everything. The more roads you build the more people you get. I think we need to have a moratorium on building till we get the roads in place.” Would like to see more assistance for low-income seniors. Ken Dean, teacher and business owner: Eminent domain: “I hate eminent domain. If a government entity is going to want to use (it) for property it should go to the voters.” Open space: “It was a very good idea but they made big mistakes.” The “lifetime tax” should have had a 10-year cap. Traffic: “It’s very simple. Synchronize every light in the city based on the speed limit, anywhere from 35 to 45 mph.” Canyon Country: Needs more parks, a mall, police station and restaurant row. Cemex: “We need to get (U.S. Rep. Howard P. “Buck”) McKeon much more involved. The council can only do so much.” Elected mayor: “I don’t want to see another layer of government piled on top of what we already have.” He favors current system where council members rotate the job. Replacing Smyth: Council members should interview candidates to replace him; requires 5-0 vote. Shelter: Yes, suggests locating in the region where the temporary site stands now, in the Golden Valley Road/Centre Pointe Parkway. Issues: “Uncontrolled development and traffic congestion.” Frank Ferry, incumbent and Saugus High School assistant principal, seeking third four-year term: Eminent domain: “We had a 5-0 vote to go forward with redevelopment. We would probably use some eminent domain in commercial areas. I have not seen any plan to go into residential areas.” Open space: Good idea, but either city failed to communicate what it was about or voters simply would not support it. Traffic: “I advocate building as many roads as possible. You cannot build enough roads in the city of Santa Clarita.” Canyon Country: “We represent everyone equally. We have probably put more assets toward Canyon Country than any other community.” That was done because the community was not master-planned by a developer, he said. Cemex: “We have spent over $4 million to purchase property, to fight in court. We are committed to continue the fight.” The city seeks to keep mining at historic levels. Elected mayor: He championed the proposal, which was voted down Tuesday 3-2 by the City Council. Replacing Smyth: Hold special election to avoid perception of an appointment as “puppet of other council members.” Shelter: “Our city, our community, our valley should be responsible for a homeless shelter within our community.” He will serve on county task force exploring solutions for Santa Clarita. Issues: How growth in unincorporated areas affects the city. Cleaning up Whittaker-Bermite property and exploiting its economic potential. Long-term: prevention and intervention for youth to curb gangs, graffiti, vandalism, drugs and alcohol use. Mark Hershey, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department sergeant: Eminent domain: “I would feel bad about it, would have to get all the facts. If that’s what’s best for the community, that’s what I would do.” Open space: Great idea. “I think they hustled it through to get it passed. They either had a horrible survey or did it quickly. Needed to limit years; no one wants a tax forever.” Traffic: He supports building alternative roads, and expanding some existing ones. It is important, he said, to build roads before the developments they will serve. Canyon Country: Hershey would seek to improve the Metrolink station, resurface streets, upgrade medians and open a satellite sheriff’s station. Cemex: “I don’t think it’s good for the area. It might be time to negotiate with them before we lose leverage.” Elected mayor: Yes. It would need to be full-time job with higher pay than today. Replacing Smyth: “If I come in fourth I’d like the fourth-place person to do it. I want them to appoint me; I don’t think they’re going to agree on that.” Shelter: He opposes a year-round shelter for the homeless, supporting the current seasonal site, but wants to gather more information. “I think they should find a place and use the same place every year so people know where it is.” Issues, short-term: The city should address racial conflict and cultural diversity at high schools and attitudes toward a Latino market proposed in Valencia. Long-term: Cleaning and exploiting potential of Whittaker-Bermite site, adequate emergency preparedness. Dwight McDonald, California Highway Patrol sergeant: Eminent domain: “I am in favor of redevelopment. (But) I don’t feel anybody there now should be disadvantaged in any way.” Open space: The failed initiative was a good idea, but “there were no limitations, no guarantees. Open space and parks should be there for perpetuity, not to later develop.” Traffic: Evaluate traffic patterns, adjust signals accordingly, explore striping, evaluate alignment of roads, more speed bumps in residential areas. Canyon Country: “What’s done on the west (side) should be done on the east, north and south.” Residents of every community should have the same amenities. Cemex: City officials “should do whatever they can to prevent it from happening. It affects noise pollution, air pollution, traffic, and it will impact the condition of roads.” Elected mayor: “We should have an elected mayor with certain conditions.” All council members should have the same authority; the mayor should serve as the city’s spokesperson. Replacing Smyth: Favors appointment of short-term custodian because a special election would be costly. “Cameron Smyth should have stepped down at the (last) election cycle to allow people to select his replacement.” Shelter: He supports finding a shelter for the homeless and suggests clients perform community service and work toward self-sufficiency. Issues: Growth and annexation. “It is not if (annexation) is going to happen but when it’s going to happen. It is time for us to have our own police and fire (departments.) We can do it more effectively and at the same cost.” He favors “controlled growth” with corresponding infrastructure improvements. Marsha McLean, incumbent and current mayor pro tem, seeking second four-year term: Eminent domain: “Many business people like friendly eminent domain because … there is a difference in taxes and capital gains taxes. When it comes down to tough decisions we have to look at the circumstances and have to weigh the pros and cons to make a decision based on what is best overall for everyone concerned.” Open space: McLean supported the ballot measure, but said it should have included a sunset clause, been more specific about how money would be spent and been managed with the help of environmental groups. She also said it should have been on a standard ballot, as opposed to the mail-in vote. Traffic: The city is building a network of roads, expediting synchronization of traffic signals and increasing quality jobs to reduce commutes. Santa Clarita inherited an infrastructure deficit from the county when it formed and is playing catch-up. Canyon Country: All communities must be treated equally, she said, and noted that many projects are under way toward equity. Cemex: The city must continue fighting the project as proposed. “It will be devastating to our community to have the entire end of that section of the valley become a huge mining operation if this project would go forward at the level it is proposed.” Elected mayor: Voted against the proposal Tuesday. Replacing Smyth: Warrants discussion, probably after June primary when Smyth’s status is more clear. Shelter: “The city has been paying for many years to help with the costs of a winter shelter in Santa Clarita.” Problem with siting a shelter is NIMBY-ism. Issues: Growth, mainly in unincorporated areas. In the city, older areas should not be allowed to deteriorate. Cleanup of Whittaker-Bermite, and public ownership and restoration of Santa Clara River. Jack Murphy, businessman: Eminent domain: “As long as it is for the greater benefit of the community at-large, if it is proven, then I could support it as a last resort.” Open space: “I had no problem with the wording. If they want to pass it they have to get it passed during an election year when you have a large voter turnout.” Traffic: “One of the main issues is cross-valley traffic.” He recommends establishing more retail options in Canyon Country and the east side of town to reduce trips to Westfield Valencia Town Center. “Offer special tax remedies to encourage businesses to move to that part of town, land that could be purchased or leased at a lower rate initially.” He also seeks the extension of a hospital and industrial center on the east side. Canyon Country: Replicate retail stores located near Interstate 5 in Canyon Country. Cemex: “Nobody is for this, but the law is the law. If we had a City Council that would have sat down and negotiated … we’ve spent millions and millions and (Cemex) is going to do basically what they want.” Elected mayor: Yes. Replacing Smyth: Appoint the candidate who comes in fourth in the council race. Shelter: He supports establishing a permanent homeless shelter, locating it in Newhall on Sierra Highway near San Fernando Road. “The city of Santa Clarita should pay for the land or donate or lease land for 10 or 15 years.” Issues: In the short term, increased crime. Long-term issues: Concerned about infrastructure keeping pace with growth and crime prevention. Lynne Plambeck, a business owner and member of the board of the Newhall County Water District: Eminent domain: She opposes it, saying, “A lot of small business owners there worked a long time to own property. I don’t think taking it for another development is the fair way to go on that. But I think if the city works with the current owners to make them owners in the redevelopment project, that could be a win-win situation for both city and small business owners.” Open space: “Frankly, I’m not sure what the idea was. The initiative was written in a very unclear fashion. One of the problems was it was not clear what properties would be purchased and how much was going to go toward park maintenance. I think the concept of acquiring more open space was wonderful.” Traffic: “We need to synchronize lights and reduce construction during business hours, look at public and alternative transportation options and (allow) less building in outlying areas.” Canyon Country: “Needs a hospital facility that’s close and needs more attention to beautifying the community when plans are approved.” Cemex: “They need to continue to pursue the legal avenues while at same time sitting down with mining management to see what compromises can be made.” Elected mayor: “No, unless they also institute a clean money ordinance.” Replacing Smyth: Hold a special election. Shelter: Yes. “The current location is a good one, away from residential areas. I do think it needs to be permanent. It is expensive to put up and take down each year.” Issues: In the near- and long-term, traffic, air pollution and water supply. Henry Schultz, retired scientist: Eminent domain: “I’m from the school of `only as a last resort.’ If it needs to be done, and a serious majority of property owners want to take that step, if it would be a benefit to the community I would look at eminent domain as a step.” Open space: “An open-space measure as it should have been was a good idea, the open-space measure as it came out was a bad idea.” The measure, he said, should have had a finite term of 10 to 15 years with the possibility of renewal, and should have specified how money would be spent. “It should have been only for purchase of land for open space and parks, because that’s what’s necessary.” The city, he said, should have hired a grant writer. Traffic: “Just building roads isn’t going to do it. You have to reduce overall density of new development because each new project brings with it new houses. We’re constrained geographically. There are certain pinch points traffic has to get through; that’s one of reasons things wont get better just building new roads.” Canyon Country: Needs a revitalization plan that includes architectural guidelines. Cemex: “At this point they’re pretty much doing all they can. The city did bring up a good case saying the consent decree went against state law.” Elected mayor: No. Replacing Smyth: Special election. Shelter: Yes. “The City Council should hold open meetings with the public to get input.” Issues: “Traffic – that’s the universal response I get from everybody, over the long term and short term. Quality of life is what’s being impacted by traffic and overdevelopment.” Laurene Weste, mayor, seeking third four-year term: Eminent domain: She supports it only as a last resort to accomplish goals of redevelopment. “It would be unfair to say to 11 property owners who want to do a project to improve their lives and their property values and businesses to have one holdout and say `I don’t want to do anything.”‘ Some property owners have OK’d the city invoking friendly eminent domain, which may yield them tax benefits. Open space: “The wording may have been unclear. It certainly didn’t translate to the voters in a way they were comfortable with it.” Traffic: The Cross-Valley Connector under construction should provide an alternate route, improve safety for emergency vehicles. Canyon Country: “Money’s not coming in unless you create a vision and they know there’s a commitment to finish it because they’re investing private money.” Incentives must be created for properties to regenerate into more exciting shopping, eating and entertainment experiences. Cemex: “We don’t oppose historic levels of mining. To completely change and destroy life on the east side of the valley, which would affect all of the valley, is unconscionable.” Santa Clarita is continuing to pursue all avenues to keep operations at historic mining levels. Elected mayor: Voted against proposal Tuesday. Replacing Smyth: She suggests several alternatives including operating with the four-member council till the 2008 election, tapping someone from another elected board, picking the fourth runner-up in April election or holding a special election. Shelter: The city has an agreement with the county to share responsibility and also has a contract with Lutheran Social Services. Growth, public safety. “All of it depends on decisions we make today.” Must continue building roads, buying open space, providing adequate sheriff’s services, crime prevention. “And not allowing any part of the city to disintegrate.” judy.orourke@dailynews.com (661) 257-5255160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Eleven candidates – including the incumbents – are in the April 11 race for three seats on the Santa Clarita City Council. Here are brief overviews of their stands on the issues: Michael Cruz, paralegal in the Los Angeles City Attorney’s office: Eminent domain “should be reserved for roads, schools and hospitals – true public use. For the city to come in and take property from one private owner and give it to another property owner in the hopes it will generate more tax revenue is wrong.” Open space: The city’s failed bid to form an open space and park district was a good idea but should have contained a cost-of-living cap and detailed future spending. The city should take 1.5 percent from its budget to issue a bond to buy land. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event To reduce traffic congestion, he suggests restriping Sierra Highway and San Fernando Road to add lanes and to work with business groups to encourage commuters to who use park-and-ride and buses routed to the Valencia Industrial Center. Canyon Country needs to be declared an economic zone to encourage businesses to return to Soledad Canyon Road. He suggests working with the Chamber of Commerce, landlords and business owners to update facades and beautify the area. To battle a proposed Cemex mine, Santa Clarita should aggressively pursue legislation with federal legislators. On an elected mayor: If city wants to grant the mayor more power, yes. On replacing Councilman Cameron Smyth if he is elected to state Assembly: Hold a special election. If the council does appoint his replacement, it should be the candidate who came in fourth in this election. last_img
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Kindergarten-bound

first_img“Five little monkeys jumping on the bed, one fell down and broke his head … ” the 4- and 5-year-olds bellowed to a crowd of proud family members and friends. The 15 Tiny Tots students were celebrating some of the lessons they’ve learned since September and taking their first steps into higher education – kindergarten. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventThursday’s graduation ceremony was an initiation of sorts into the world of elementary school and their pseudo-independence when it comes to learning, said Marla Tejeda. “You see them come in shy and timid because they’re leaving their parents,” said Tejeda, one of the program’s main teachers. “But this gives them a dab of what’s to come in the future of schooling.” Tiny Tots graduate Destiny Krause said she loved being part of the pre-kindergarten program. The 5-year-old Norwalk resident admits she likes school and said some of her favorite memories of her twice-weekly classes were the field trips and “taking pictures.” Barbara Geffre of Santa Fe Springs enrolled her son, Zachary, 4, in Tiny Tots for the social and friendship opportunities it offers. • Photo Gallery: 04/27: Tiny Tots graduation SANTA FE SPRINGS – Some of the city’s youngest students, donning blue, pint-sized caps and gowns, marched into Town Center Hall on Thursday and sang their hearts out. center_img For More Info Carol Joseph, Parks and Recreation Services Division supervisor, said the program curriculum is geared to help children develop some confidence before they enter kindergarten. Though the students learn basics like their ABCs and numbers, the Santa Fe Springs program primarily incorporates opportunities in which the youths can get accustomed to being apart from their parents. Krause seems to have picked up on the people skills nicely. She enthusiastically said she enjoyed doing the “Chicken Dance Medley” because “when I go fast, I smile.” araceli.esparza@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3024160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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SHAY NAMED MENTAL HEALTH AMBASSADOR FOR DONEGAL

first_imgFormer Republic of Ireland international goalkeeperShay Given, has been named as ambassador for a new youth mental health project in Donegal.The Donegal Youth Council SPARKS Mental Health Roadshow has been developed “by young people for young people” in the county.It kicks off on World Mental Health Day on October 10 and will travel to all the electoral areas with events planned for Letterkenny, Stranorlar, Gweedore, Buncrana and Donegal Town. The roadshow will cater for some 1,000 young people across the county and aims to offer information and advice on how to manage stress during exam times and other difficult situations.It will promote awareness through fun activities and will offer a range of inspirational speakers, workshops and other activities “with a few surprises along the way”.The roadshow has been developed using the ‘Mental Health 5 A Day’ model, which is internationally now recognised as five key areas that can have a positive effect on health and wellbeing.Jigsaw, the Donegal Youth Service, the HSE Health Promotion unit, Foroige and Mental Health Ireland are all involved and guest speakers from the wider community will each have conquered their own personal challenges in life. Mount Everest conqueror Jason Black and open sea swimmer Anne Marie Ward are among those lined up to take part. The first event kicks off in Letterkenny at the Mount Errigal Hotel on October 10 before going to Stranorlar (Finn Valley Centre) on October 24, Gweedore (Ionad Naomh Padraig) on Novermber 7, Buncrana (Plaza) on November 21 and Donegal Town (Abbey Hotel ) on November 28.SHAY NAMED MENTAL HEALTH AMBASSADOR FOR DONEGAL was last modified: October 3rd, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:AmbassadorMental Health RoadshowShay Givenlast_img read more

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FARMER TINNEY NEEDS YOUR HELP ON THE FARM THIS WEEKEND!

first_imgFEATURES: On the 5th of September it’s all farm hands on deck!Farmer Tinney from Tinney’s Toys needs help on the farm. The farm has been crazy over the summer and Farmer Tinney needs some little farmers to get things back to normal.He needs help with the animals, his tractor rides and lots more!To get little farmers for Farmer Tinney, Tinney’s toys are having this event that is fun for all the family.There will be Tractor rides, Gator rides, facepainting, refreshments and more! Kids will get the real farm experience, everything from riding behind a tractor to petting live animals.Everyone is welcome to this fun day out.Help Farmer Make hay while the sun shines, come along to Tinney’s Toys Family Fun on the Farm!FARMER TINNEY NEEDS YOUR HELP ON THE FARM THIS WEEKEND! was last modified: September 4th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BusinessFeaturesnewslast_img read more

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Fanad Lighthouse to benefit from slice of €10,000 allocated to Gaeltacht projects

first_imgMinister for the Gaeltacht Joe McHugh has sanctioned more than €10,000 for four different projects in County Donegal.The four areas to benefit from the grants are Downings, Carrigart, Fanad, and Kilcar.The breakdown is as follows; · €3,600 sanctioned for Coiste Céim Aniar Teo, Na Dúnaibh to purchase computer equipment and furniture· €2,910 for Grúpa Ceoil Dhuibhlinn Riabhach, Scoil Cholmcille, Duibhlinn Riabhach, Carraig Airt, to purchase musical instruments· €2,885 sanctioned for Forbairt Fhánada Teo to carry out works at Fánaid Light House· €970 for Coiste Halla Paróiste Chill CharthaighMinister McHugh said he said that he was pleased to provide the grant to assist the projects with their work on behalf of the Irish language and the local community.On the Fanad allocations, the Minister: “This Coiste is undoubtedly doing wonderful work in attracting tourists to the lighthouse on the Wild Atlantic Way. They have a huge emphasis on the Irish language as they provide guided tours in Irish.”On the Carrigart funding, Minister McHugh added: “Announcing the grant, the Minister of State said that he was very pleased to provide this grant. “Valuable work has been carried out for many years in this school to promote the Irish language in the area and this assistance recognises that work which benefits the language and the community as a whole.”The grants were sanctioned by the Minister under the Gaeltacht action of the 20-Year Strategy for the Irish Language 2010-2030.Fanad Lighthouse to benefit from slice of €10,000 allocated to Gaeltacht projects was last modified: September 6th, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CarrigartDowningsFanadGAELTACHTirishjoe mc hughkilcarProjectslast_img read more

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