The new work and pensions secretary scrapped the d

first_imgThe new work and pensions secretary scrapped the disability and employment white paper prepared by his predecessor Iain Duncan Smith because he “didn’t like the look” of it, a Tory MP has told a parliamentary meeting.The new work and pensions secretary Stephen Crabb (pictured) had previously said that he wanted to “take a step back” from previous government plans to publish a white paper that would have included “firm legislative proposals” on supporting disabled people into work.But fellow Conservative MP Heidi Allen told the all-party parliamentary disability group that there had been “a little bit of cynicism” about why Crabb had decided to postpone the white paper when he took over from Duncan Smith in March.Some MPs and campaigners had criticised the decision, claiming that it was “kicking the issue into the long grass” and complaining that ministers had previously “bought off their own rebels” with a promise to have firm proposals in place through the white paper by the summer.That promise had been made after Tory backbench unease about plans to cut almost £30 a week from payments to new claimants placed in the work-related activity group of employment and support allowance.But Allen said of Crabb’s white paper decision: “Honestly and truthfully, between these four walls, he didn’t like the look of the old one.”She later told Disability News Service that this information had not come directly from Crabb, but that she had heard he was “unhappy with the white paper proposals as far as they had developed and wanted to start the process again, engage with disability groups and go back to a green paper”.Crabb had earlier told the meeting – he left before Allen made her comments – that the issue of disability employment had received “nothing like the real high level attention it deserves within government” and that he had come in “with a fresh pair of eyes” to look at the manifesto pledge to halve the disability employment gap.He said he had made the decision “not to rush ahead with the white paper” because he realised that there were many people who “want to be working, want to be doing something, want support… but are not getting that support at the moment”.He also repeated his pledge that, following his decision to scrap further cuts to personal independence payment – announced in the wake of Duncan Smith’s resignation – he was not going to “dip into another part of the welfare budget” to fill that gap.Tomlinson, who also addressed the meeting, claimed that disabled people would “tell us the best way to do it” through the green paper, and that those employers that were able to “adapt” would benefit from employing more disabled people.He said: “We have to make sure businesses have the confidence that they are offering opportunities to disabled people based on ability and not disability.”And he said the government needed to ensure that businesses were “well supported” and that “best practice is shared”.But Tomlinson was heavily-criticised for his department’s failure to do more to help dyslexic job-seekers.After he said DWP was “doing a lot more upskilling across the Jobcentre Plus network” on dyslexia, Margaret Malpas, chair of the British Dyslexia Association (BDA), said her charity had provided free training for DWP staff, and had not even had its expenses paid.She said: “It’s ridiculous. I don’t know what we do to get noticed. We cannot get a hearing, we can’t get anybody to speak to us from DWP, or anywhere else.”Tomlinson said that one of his most senior members of staff was dyslexic, and he agreed to meet with BDA, and said: “I understand the importance. You are preaching to the converted.“There is some stuff being done. A lot more needs to be done.”last_img read more

Read More →

Friends and fellow campaigners are mourning the lo

first_imgFriends and fellow campaigners are mourning the loss of Sophie Partridge – a disabled performer, writer and activist of wit, wisdom and “genuine kindness” – who died last week.She was best-known for her work as an actor, performing in the London 2012 Paralympic Games opening ceremony, and in a string of Graeae Theatre Company productions.But she also played a leading role in high-profile disability rights and anti-austerity campaigns, fighting the closure of the Independent Living Fund (ILF) and cuts to the Access to Work programme and other government support.Her close friend and fellow performer Mik Scarlet said Partridge was “super talented, warm-hearted… and improved the lives of everyone she came in contact with”.Other friends and fellow campaigners also paid tribute this week to her talent, her kindness and her commitment to disability rights.The disabled crossbench peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell, said she would be “sorely missed by many”, while Eleanor Lisney said Partridge was an “untiring” campaigner who had “a ready smile and encouraging words for everybody”.Scarlet said he first met her when he was at the BBC’s Disability Programmes Unit (DPU) in the early 1990s and she was playing the part of a personal assistant-user in a piece for the magazine programme From The Edge.He said he was “immediately struck by her talent as an actor”, and added: “She was word perfect every time and had the most amazing comedy timing.“It wasn’t just me that was struck by her talent, the whole DPU was too and Sophie was soon a regular on the show.“She was the go-to actor whenever we wanted an ‘every person’ type who could play straight in the silliest of situations.”He later worked with Partridge again – and they became close friends – when they were both part of the Rhinestone Rollers Graeae production.He said: “This show was amazing, and Sophie was a star.”They also worked together on the Paralympics opening ceremony, with Scarlet remembering her “dry wit and ability to make everyone else laugh while appearing to not be joking”.He later worked with her again on a news report for Channel 5 on the legacy of the London 2012 Paralympics, in which “she described why so many felt so let down by the supposed legacy of 2012.“The whole news team were thoroughly impressed with her, and she made the item.”Baroness Campbell said: “Sophie brought a sense of fun, satirical genius and genuine kindness to every occasion, whether social or campaigning.“I don’t think I’ve ever enjoyed being teased so ruthlessly, as I did when I was by Sophie.“Her sharp wit was particularly welcome when we were campaigning together on issues that frighten so many disabled people to their core – regression on independent living and assisted suicide, being our mutual top two.”But she said she also enjoyed her talents away from the “battlefield”.She said: “As a consummate actor, she also enthralled me, in plays like peeling in 2002 and her solo performance in Song Of Semmersuaq.“For someone so small, she was a giant on stage and on the barricades.”Lisney said Partridge never talked about herself and her achievements, and was “a lovely person, very unassuming, [with] a great sense of humour and a caring person.“She had a ready smile and encouraging words for everybody. She cared for people beyond her own circle of friends.“As a campaigner, I remember her best in her untiring work for the ILF. She was very effective in her message.“She fought for disability rights, whether as a creative practitioner or as an activist.” In a statement, Graeae said the company was “devastated” to hear of her death.The statement said: “Sophie’s talent has been woven through Graeae’s productions and workshops since 2000 and many of us feel privileged to have called her our friend.“We feel her loss deeply but she leaves behind a legacy of delighted audiences of tens of thousands who were lucky enough to have seen her perform.”Partridge had trained in Graeae’s Missing Piece programme, and went on to take one of the lead roles in Kate O’Reilly’s play peeling, which Graeae said was “inspired by Sophie’s wit and warmth”, and appeared in Graeae’s George Dandin, Flower Girls, the Rhinestone Rollers and The Limbless Knight.But she also led workshops and residencies for Graeae and was part of its outreach team over the last 17 years.Graeae said she was a “tireless advocate campaigning for the need for an inclusive society”, and a “brilliant spokesperson for the rights of Deaf and disabled people”.Partridge was one of the most prominent of the disabled activists who spoke out against the planned ILF closure.In an interview recorded by campaigning journalist Kate Belgrave in January 2013, she described how she had written to the then prime minister David Cameron, and told him: “It’s not my impairment which makes me vulnerable, it is your cut. It is your policies.“You know, you give us decent resources and we will add to your economy, we will contribute to your blessed, blinking Big Society, we will play our part but we have to have adequate resources.”In the film, she said it was “too scary to contemplate” the thought of disabled people being forced into residential care as a result of the ILF closure, and added: “One way or another we have to ensure that that does not happen. We can’t go back 30-odd years.”In a parliamentary meeting attended by Labour MPs John McDonnell and Jeremy Corbyn in January 2015, several months before they became Labour’s leader and shadow chancellor, Partridge said she could not imagine life without ILF.She told that meeting: “Younger people who are in situations that I was in when I was 21, wanting to live independently, wanting the same opportunities as any other young person… I cannot see how that is going to be achievable without the ILF.”She also campaigned against other government austerity measures.In October 2013, she attended the 10,000 Cuts and Counting memorial event in Parliament Square, held to remember disabled victims of austerity.Alongside fellow speakers, including Corbyn and McDonnell, she read extracts from the emails, blogs and other posts of Karen Sherlock, who had died the previous year after fighting the injustice of the government’s “fitness for work” assessment regime.She also supported the StopChanges2ATW campaign, describing in 2014 how she had suddenly encountered problems when applying for Access to Work support so she could appear at the DaDaFest International 2014 festival, where she was to perform Song Of Semmersuaq.She said at the time: “It just seems to be one assault after another on disabled people, it really does.“It is undermining our status in society every day, bit by bit.”She was also a prominent campaigner on disabled people’s right to life issues, including supporting Not Dead Yet UK (NDY UK) in its opposition to legalising assisted suicide.In another film, for NDY UK in 2015, as part of its Assist Us To Live Not Die! campaign, she said: “I’ve been dependent on people my whole life so what kind of statement and judgement is that on my life, and also what if anybody that acquires an impairment becomes disabled, what kind of a message is that to send to them that it’s all completely hopeless and they might as well kill themselves?”Her last message on the social media platform Twitter was to express her support for Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, six days before the general election, telling her followers: “How could anyone NOT vote for Jezza?! :-)”Scarlet said Partridge was “one of the wisest people I have known, super talented, warm hearted and a massive loss to everyone who knew her.“She fought for disabled people’s rights, shone on stage and screen, was an amazing friend and improved the lives of everyone she came in contact with. “She may have been pixie sized, but the hole she has left in the universe is too big to measure.”Picture: Sophie Partridge in Flower Girls. Photograph by Patrick Baldwinlast_img read more

Read More →

A Young Sitar Player Mastering Her Craft

first_img Tags: 16th Street BART • Music Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% This is one of a series of profiles on the musicians who make up the Mission District. Read our stories on the Mission “Blues Man” and a sharply-dressed Mexican folksinger.After studying the sitar for about four years, 26-year-old Rhiannon Ledwell is still mastering the instrument.During the week, she studies North Indian classical music at a private school in San Rafael. But on the weekends, she heads up to the Mission District to busk at the 16th Street BART Station, improvising over the looped recording of a tanpura, a droning, atmospheric Indian instrument that sets a background tone for a song.Like another musician I’ve profiled, Ledwell finds that passers-by tip more avidly for fast, upbeat songs. When I met her on a recent weekend, she had made $60 after almost three hours of playing — tips were unusually good that day, she said. It’s little money for someone who is paying down a fine arts education, but Ledwell doesn’t let it get to her.“I’ve been struggling with debt for so long now that I don’t care” she said, adding philosophically, “It doesn’t really exist.” And sometimes she supplements that income by playing at weddings or yoga classes, on referral from one of her teachers.The sitar’s soothing, bending tones attract soulful and eccentric characters on an almost daily basis, she said. One man, who told her he had been a fighter pilot in the U.S. Air Force, recited poetry to her about “releasing the ego.” Someone else told her that he planned to hold meditation sessions at home for his friends and he wanted to hire Ledwell to play for them. Elated, she said yes.Photo by Stella Sadikin.Many people have never seen a sitar before, and they ask Ledwell what kind of guitar it is. She smiles, and steps gingerly into a practiced rundown about the instrument and Indian classical music.Ledwell’s sitar has seven playable strings, but 13 others are recessed into its neck and audibly resonate as she plays. She tunes them differently to suit a song’s raga – its musical foundation. The raga’s closest equivalent in Western music is the scale, which specifies the tones a musician can play. But the various ragas go one step farther, allowing only certain tones for ascending in pitch, and a different set when descending. Certain ragas are associated with specific emotions, times of the day, and sometimes Hindu gods.Ledwell has had an instrument in her hands since day one: A flute in elementary school, then a saxophone in high school. When she began attending Colby College in 2007, she dreamed of being a jazz musician. But she ultimately realized that she lacked the drive to make it in that genre.Then one semester, a sitar player from India visited Colby to train students, and Ledwell was instantly hooked. “It just felt right,” she said, “I thought, ‘I have to learn this instrument.’” In 2011, she dropped out of school entirely and departed alone for India, diving headfirst into its music and culture.She spent six months studying with one of the country’s top sitar soloists, Pandit Shubhendra Roa. “It was the best decision I ever made,” she said.She continued training in the United States under Grammy-nominated Aashish Khan Debsharma at the California Institute of the Arts. When she graduated in May, she embraced a bohemian lifestyle. For months she camped in the mountains or lived out of her weathered ’96 Toyota Camry, parked somewhere in the Marin Headlands or atop Mount Tamalpais. Finally, she found a home in San Rafael, near the school where she now studies.Her landlord, the mother of an old college friend, lets her live there free of charge. She knows that won’t be true forever, and at some point she’ll probably have to get a regular, boring job. Or, she might just go live and work on a farm, she said.But something about her current lifestyle soothes her recurring itch to stuff her belongings into a backpack and burn the maps. “I want to be right here, and do what I’m already doing,” she said.At least for the moment, Ledwell has found a kind of peace on a curbside in the Mission District. center_img 0%last_img read more

Read More →

TWO St Helens youngsters have been named in the En

first_imgTWO St Helens youngsters have been named in the England Youth squad to take on France this Easter.The Youth side will renew their traditional Easter rivalry with France when they travel across the channel for a two-test series which begins on Friday April 6, with the second test to be played on Tuesday April 10 while a second Youth side will take on Wales on Wednesday April 4.Oliver Davies and Dave Hewitt have been named by England Youth coach Dave Elliott as part of the 20-man squad to travel to take on France.“Both sets of players have big tests coming up and they’ll be presented with different types of challenges,” said Elliott.“We know the French side will be physical and their age groups always give us a strong test and Wales will put up a big fight as well so this is a fantastic opportunity for these lads to experience what it’s like to play in an international game.“There are a lot of newcomers to the international environment in this squad so we’re keen to see how they respond to the challenges put in front of them. We’ve got a lot of talented players at our disposal and we’re confident that they can get the results.”England 20-man squad to face France:Joseph Bretherton (Wigan Warriors/Wigan St Patricks/St Edmund-Arrowsmith)Jordan Burns (Warrington Wolves/Kells ARLFC/St Benedicts Catholic High School)Oliver Davies (St Helens/Orrel St James/Upholland High School)Oliver Gildart (Wigan Warriors/Wigan St Patricks/St Edmund-Arrowsmith)Joshua Greenwood-MacDonald (Bradford Bulls/King Coss Park/Crossley Heath Grammar School)Nick Gregson (Wigan Warriors/Wigan St Patricks/Standish High~)Dave Hewitt (St Helens/Bold Miners RLFC/St Cuthberts Community College)Bradley Lawrence (Wigan Warriors/Ellenborough Rangers/St Joesphs Catholic High School)Kruise Leeming (Warrington Wolves/Siddal/Brooksbank)Harry Lightfoot Brown (London Broncos/Elmbridge Eagles/Claremont Fan Court)Jack Logan (Hull FC/Skirlaugh Bulls/Kelvin Hall)George Milton (Leeds Rhinos/Oulton Raiders/Guisley Tech School)Elliot Minchella (Leeds Rhinos/Siddal/St Bedes Catholic Grammar)Elliot Morris (Huddersfield Giants/Meltham All Blacks/Honley High)Ben Passmore (Leeds Rhinos/Hunslet Parkside/Mount St Marys)Jake Shorrocks (Wigan Warriors/Wigan St Patricks/Standish High)Jared Simpson (Bradford Bulls/Kings Cross Park/Netherhall Learning Campus)David Thompson (Wigan Warriors/Wigan St Patricks/Abraham Guest)Luke Waterworth (Wigan Warriors/Ince Rose Bridge ARL/Deanery High School)Kameron Pearce-Paul (London Broncos/Croyden Hurricanes/Ravens Wood)England 21-man squad to face Wales (Professional Club, Amateur Club and School)Connor Adams (Wigan Warriors/Telford Raiders/The Burton Borough School)Frederick Bailey (Midlands/Telford Raiders/Burton Burough)Ashley Bastiman (Hull FC/Skirlaugh Bulls/South Holderness College)Will Carlos (Huddersfield Giants/Stanley Rangers/Castle Hall Academy)Kane Ditchfield (Warrington Wolves/Crossfield/Bridgwater High)Gabriel Fell (Wigan Warriors/Rose Bridge/St John Fisher Catholic High School)Louis Foster (Widnes/Halton Hornets/Wade Deacon High School)Jordan Hill (NA/Leigh East/Lowton High School)Kieran Holt (Wakefield Wildcats/Stanley Rangers/Outwood Grange Academy)Jack Johnson (Warrington Wolves/Saddleworth Rangers/Audenshaw School)Joseph Keyes (London Broncos/Brentwood Elvers/Leventhorpe Academy)Ryan Langton (Hull FC/Skirlaugh Bulls/Kingswood College)Lewis Lord-Lowe (Leeds Rhinos/York Acorn/Tadcaster Grammar School)Aron Manger (Leeds Rhinos/Siddal/The Brooksbank School Sports College)Frazer Morris (Huddersfield Giants/Meltham All Blacks/Honley High)Ashley Robson (Leeds Rhinos/York Acorn/York High School)Bradley Thompson (Salford/Kells ARLFC/Whitehaven School)Harry Tyson-Wilson (Hull FC/Skirlaugh Bulls/Sirius Academy)Jacob Ware (Leeds Rhinos/Westgate Wolves/Outwood Grange Academy)Dominic Wear (Wigan Warriors/Kells ARLFC/St Benedicts Catholic High School)Kane Young (North East/Durham Tigers/Framwellgate School of Durham)last_img read more

Read More →

St Helens U19s 58 v 18 Sheffield Eagles U19sA comm

first_imgSt Helens U19s 58 v 18 Sheffield Eagles U19sA commanding second half display from the Saints saw them overcome and eventually outclass the never-say-die visitors from over the Pennines but it took stern words at the break to snap the Saints into action, writes Graham Henthorne.Whether complacency crept in due to the Eagles lowly position in the table or there was a hangover from Monday’s wonderful win at Headingley, the Saints were not at the races in the first half.The visitors raced into a six point lead scoring on their first attack and made it ten on quarter time catching the Saints napping on an overlap down the right.The visitors then gifted the Saints an opportunity to get back into the saddle committing their first error of the game by knocking on at the kick off. Two tackles from the scrum and Connor Dwyer took advantage of his power to score down the left.Minutes later and props Greg Richards and James Tilley were driving the Saints forward. Lewis Charnock just got his nose through the line before offloading superbly to the supporting Dave Hewitt who went the final 40 metres to the line. Charnock’s conversion gave the Saints the lead.Dwyer was held up over the line before a big tackle from Charnock caused the Eagles to knock on. Four tackles later great interplay between André Savelio (pictured against Leeds earlier in the season) and Tilley resulted in the big second row scoring at the posts.The visitors showed great desire all through the game and again punished Saints indiscipline and poor tackling to score, the conversion bringing them back within two.Saints’ blushes were spared just a little as Hewitt decided to run the ball on the last. Quick hands from Dwyer gave the ball to debutant Jordan Tisdale who took it 30 metres out. The scouser showed that it’s not all about the round ball in that city as he took it to the full back, dummied outside to his winger before diving over for a great individual try.The half time wakeup call had the desired effect as the Saints came out with renewed vigour keeping the visitors scoreless after the break epitomised by Adam Saunders and Tom Roughley who saved tries with heroic last ditch tackling.It was Roughley who capped a fine display off the bench with the opening score of the second period finishing a move he had started dummying his way to the sticks.Connor Dwyer reprieved his run through the Eagles right side defence in the first half for his second try and the Saints were away.Roughley again made a 40 metre break only to be caught by the full back but Greg Richards charged over for rare try from the play the ball.The Eagles were finally starting to wilt in the sun and three tries in the final 15 minutes gave the score the look it should have had at the start of play.Charnock broke through 60 metres out outpacing the cover to the sticks, then a great last tackle kick chase from Richards, Tilley and Joe Ryan forced the Eagles to drop out. Saunders took the drop out down the right, dummied to his winger before scoring in the corner.The last act saw Jack Ashworth curve around the defence to score at the posts after a great 40/20 from Matty Fozard.Plaudits must go to the Eagles who, despite the score, never gave up and pushed the Saints to the end.Having said that had the Saints played anything like they did for 40 minutes over 80, then the final score would have been what this club should expect to be inflicting on winless bottom of the table sides.Best for the Saints were Connor Dwyer and Tom Roughley with an encouraging, combative debut from Jordan Tisdale a highlight.Match Summary:Saints: Tries: Adam Saunders, Jordan Tisdale, Jack Ashworth, Dave Hewitt, Greg Richards, André Savelio, Connor Dwyer 2, Tom Roughley, Lewis Charnock.Goals: Lewis Charnock 9.Sheffield:Tries: Nick Taylor, Eddie Medforth, Joe Wilmott.Goals: Corey Aston 2.Half Time: 22-16Full Time: 58-16Teams:Saints:20. Adam Saunders; 2. Matty Fleming, 4. Jack Ashworth, 3. Jordan Tisdale, 5. Ben Parry; 6. Dave Hewitt, 7. Dan Abram; 10. James Tilley, 9. Matty Fozard, 8. Greg Richards, 11. Connor Dwyer, 12. André Savelio, 13. Lewis Charnock. Subs: 14. Tom Calland, 15. Tom Roughley, 17. Matt Cooke, 19. Joe Ryan.Sheffield:1. Dan Saubney; 2. John Hale, 3. Nick Taylor, 4. Eddie Medforth, 5. Ryan Miller; 6. Corey Aston, 7. Callum Butler; 8. Joe Kenyon, 9. Greg Burns, 10. Liam Ellis, 11. Kadeem Williams, 12. Tom Bailey, 13. Joe Wilmott. Subs: 14. Jack Mitchell, 15. Darren Ford, 16. Joe Bachelor, 17. Ben Mahmood.last_img read more

Read More →

Businesses back to normal after gas leak in Leland

first_imgLELAND, NC (WWAY) — A gas leak forced a few businesses near Magnolina Greens in Leland to evacuate for a little while on Wednesday morning.Fire Chief John Grimes says a construction vehicle hit a gas line near Logan Homes on Gregory Road.- Advertisement – First Bank, O’Leary’s Auto and Logan Homes were evacuated.Gregory Road was closed off while crews worked to fix the leak.The road is back open and all evacuations have been lifted.last_img

Read More →

Cabana ban sparks outrage in Sunset Beach

first_img “If the town had just waited until after the season was over I don’t think there would be any uproar at all,” Sandlappers Beach Supplies and Cabana Anna Owner, Kevin Godwin said. “This is their highlight of their vacation week. They can spend the whole day on the beach with this.”It is something many from across the country look forward to when on vacation in Sunset Beach.“We do it every year,” tourist, Dan Murtaugh said. “We all come from Maryland and Pennsylvania to be able to spend all day out on that beach. I honestly don’t think we would do it without having the protection of the canopies.”Related Article: NCDOT improvements underway for three Brunswick County roadsMayor Pro Tem Mark Benton sent WWAY the following statement:“Cabana rentals for private use is of course allowed. Local rental companies will continue to rent and can deliver cabanas to private homes, they can no longer assemble and dismantle on the beach. Since we established Cabanas in 2007, there has been a constant flow of issues from; leaving broken ones on the beach, to reserving space and leaving the cabana empty, as well, with higher tides, there is less access for people to enjoy the beach. This was a fair compromise,” Benton said in a statement.While vendors can still rent cabanas for private use and deliver them to private homes, business owners and tourists say that defeats the purpose.“The Sunset Beach Town Council wants to tell elderly people that already have enough infirmities already to pick up one of these 45 pound canopies, walk it 100 yards down the beach, and set it up and then take it back down at the end of the day,” Godwin said.“To walk out and have them set up and know that they’re safely secured and that somebody will come take them down is, you know, is worth a lot,” Murtaugh said.Councilman John Corbett was against the ban.“It really doesn’t support our business vendors who are very important to our island and our city,” Corbett said. “And it also seems to send a message out that keep the tourists away.”Aside from losing business and tourists, Corbett said overall it is not the right move.“I think the 3 councilmen who oppose having commercial cabanas can be the people who are out here every morning and assist the visitors to take their cabanas down and set them up,” Corbett said.As of right now, Benton said the old rules are still in place until they hold a special meeting scheduled for Tuesday.Benton adds pending the meeting results the new rules will go into effect on that day. SUNSET BEACH, NC (WWAY) — If you like to catch some rays at Sunset Beach, catching some shade may be a bit more difficult this summer.On Monday, the Sunset Beach Town Council voted 3 to 2 to ban companies from setting up cabanas they rent on the beach. It is a move many are upset with.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Read More →

Hotel manager wont be charged in Oak Island shooting

first_img According to the district attorney’s office, after an investigation the department determined that Thomas Everette Craddock will not be charged for the death of Michael Christopher Auvil.They say evidence shows that Craddock was legally justified in using deadly force and add that impairment may have been a contributing cause of the Auvil’s actions.Oak Island Police responded to the Driftwood Motel around 11:00 p.m. that Saturday.Related Article: Man killed in officer-involved shooting in Raleigh identifiedCraddock had called 911 to report a disturbance on the motel property.The officers arrived on scene to find Craddock lying on his back in front of the motel  grounds with Auvil lying across his legs.Auvil had been shot in the head and Craddock had visible lacerations on his face.Eye-witness told officials that Auvil had been in an altercation with a Driftwood Motel employee earlier in the day.Craddock was informed of this initial altercation and arrived at the Motel soon thereafter.Upon seeing Auvil enter his vehicle, which was parked at an adjoining beach access, Craddock stood behind Auvil’s vehicle and called 911, reporting the vehicle’s license plate number to the 911 operator.At that time, Auvil got of his vehicle and, with a knife in hand, aggressively approached Craddock, causing Craddock to retreat towards the motel property.While Craddock backpedaled, Auvil struck Craddock in the face with the knife, causinga laceration to Craddock’s face. As Auvil continued to move forward, Craddock, who was lawfully armed with a 9mm handgun, defended himself by shooting Auvil.A filet knife and sheath were located at the scene. The North Carolina State crime lab located Auvil’s DNA on the knife handle and sheath.The investigation further revealed that Auvil had been drinking heavily earlier that day and an autopsy confirmed that his blood alcohol level was nearly three times the legal limit.District Attorney Jon David, members of his staff, and a detective from the Oak Island Police Department recently met with Auvil’s family to discuss the decision not to pursue charges in this case.While the initial contact took place off the motel property and Thomas Craddock could have called the police without approaching Auvil’s vehicle, the state cannot prove that Craddock was not acting self-defense when he shot Auvil. Shooting in Oak Island on July 23, 2017 (Photo: Jenna Kurzyna/WWAY) BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A hotel manager will not face charges in the deadly shooting that happened last summer at the Driftwood Motel in Oak Island.The shooting happened on July 22, 2017.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Read More →

Food and water distribution sites announced in New Hanover

first_img These are the POD locationsNorth POD – Formerly The Rock Church now being used as College Park Elementary School at 5301 Sidbury Road, Castle Hayne NC 28429Central POD – CFCC – Downtown Main Campus – 700 N. Front Street, Wilmington, NC 28401.  Between Brunswick and Hanover Street. THIS LOCATION WILL ALSO HAVE A WALK-UP OPTION.South POD – Veteran’s Park – 840 Halyburton Memorial Parkway, Wilmington, NC 28412Key Points to Remember:Please ensure you have enough gas in your car to ensure your car does not run out of gas while waiting for supplies.There are no restrooms at the POD locationsThese PODs are designed to get people in and out in the most efficient manner possible. Please follow all directional signage.New Hanover County Emergency Management continues to operate the Emergency Operations Center and Joint Information Center in response to Hurricane Florence.Related Article: NC chief justice to tour hurricane-damaged court facilities in Pender CountyAnyone with questions can call the public information hotline telephone number at (910) 798-6800. 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings NEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) –- New Hanover County, in partnership with FEMA, the Civil Air Patrol and volunteers from General Electric, will be opening three Points of Distribution Sites (PODS) tomorrow, September 18 at 10 a.m.These sites will offer Meals Ready to Eat (MREs), water and tarps to residents of New Hanover County, including the beach towns, and the City of Wilmington. After tomorrow, the PODs will operate daily from 7 a.m.-7 p.m.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Read More →

Super Saturday Christmas Parade carries on despite flooding

first_img Earlier Saturday morning, there was major flooding in some parts of the town that left people worried the parade would be cancelled.“We’re so happy this year that we didn’t get rained out. We had a lot of rain this morning and a very high tide, so our roads are still a little wet. But you can see, we’re following through with our tradition and we top it off this afternoon with a tree lighting and visit from Santa at the fire station, and a flotilla at dark,” said Mayor Debbie Smith.Smith says some of the golf carts were not able to come out because of the flooding. She says they still followed their normal route. 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings OCEAN ISLE BEACH, NC (WWAY) — Ocean Isle Beach residents did not let it rain on their parade Saturday. Their Super Saturday event kicked off the Christmas season.Super Saturday started off with the annual Christmas parade. Ocean Isle Beach Mayor Debbie Smith says they usually have tons of golf carts and trucks decorated for the parade.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Read More →