Saint Mary’s women speak out against sexual violence

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame community recognized survivors of rape and sexual assault at Take Back the Night on Thursday evening, with events hosted across the two campuses. Connie Adams, assistant director for the Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO), worked with the team of sponsors for the event. The Core Council, Men Against Violence, and S-O-S of the Family Justice Center are co-sponsoring the event. She said this is the second year BAVO has co-sponsored Take Back the Night (TBTN) with the Gender Relations Center at Notre Dame. “The Take Back the Night event is an opportunity to stand in solidarity with survivors of rape and sexual assault, and to show a commitment to preventing this violence from happening in our community,” Adams said. A candlelight vigil service began the night at 7 p.m. at Lake Marian on Saint Mary’s campus, followed by a walk to Notre Dame’s campus. There, participants shared their experiences at a “Speak Out,” and gathered together for a hospitality and music afterwards. “The kickoff at Saint Mary’s provided a space to gather as a community and walk in solidarity to Notre Dame together as one,” Adams said. “As a women’s institution, it is essential that we offer ways to break the silence which often surrounds sexual violence.” Adams said a strong component of TBTN is solidarity. It is logical for the deeply-intertwined communities of Saint Mary’s College and the University of Notre Dame to stand together against violence and support survivors, she said. “A primary purpose of our offices is to implement programming to reduce and address sexual violence,” Adams said. TBTN also allows Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame to embrace Catholic social teaching by recognizing the dignity of the human person and encouraging solidarity, Adams said. “The primary aim of the event is to offer a space for survivors of sexual assault to have a voice, to shine their light into the darkness of violence,” she said. “However, it is critical for all members of our community to support those impacted by violence and to have a presence showing our commitment to prevent this violence from happening in our community. “I hope students are empowered through their participation and recognize that our community is dedicated to eliminating violence.” According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest Network, the issues of sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking impact college-age women at disproportionately higher rates than other demographics. National statistics indicate one out of every six women will be sexually assaulted during their lifetime. College-aged women are four times more likely to be sexually assaulted, and 60 percent of sexual assaults go unreported, Adams said. “If violence exists, regardless of the frequency, the need to raise awareness and promote action is essential,” Adams said. “We live in a society where violence is an epidemic, and it is our responsibility to create change and to support survivors.”last_img read more

Read More →

Magazine editor reflects on career

first_imgAs Notre Dame Magazine editor, Kerry Temple tells the Notre Dame story — as a class of 1974 graduate, English major and former Farley Hall resident, the University has inevitably become part of his own story. Seven years after he turned his tassle, Temple returned to take a writer job at the magazine, became editor in 1995 and has lead the publication for almost 20 years.Temple said his Notre Dame story began with the impression of the university he formed as a high school student in Louisiana. Kerry Temple “I looked up to the local guys who went to Notre Dame from my high school and really liked what the place represented,” he said. “A campus visit convinced me that it was the only school I wanted to go to.”Temple said he set his mind to grappling with life’s big questions early on during his time as an undergraduate.“I wanted to learn all I could about the world, the meaning of nature,” he said. “I wanted to find myself, to know what it meant to be human, and then I wanted to know how I might fit into that world, what my place was, how I could contribute.“Those questions guided my coursework and late-night talks and times spent alone. I’m still living those questions.”Temple said he returned to Louisiana after graduation to earn a master’s degree in journalism, but his career path ultimately brought him back to Notre Dame through a writing job at Notre Dame Magazine in 1981.“The magazine seemed like an extension of the University and the education I had gotten, and the subject matter was varied and engaging and dealt with stuff I liked,” Temple said. “To a large degree, my work at the magazine is a continuation of my time as an undergrad.”Temple said he published a book in 2005 that addresses some of the same questions that interested him as a Notre Dame student.“Some years ago I wrote a book, ‘Back to Earth,’ about the search for God in the natural world,” he said. “It was the book I dreamed of writing when I was an undergrad here, when I was exploring the world and myself and my place in it.”Throughout his years at Notre Dame Magazine, Temple said he has seen much continuity in the magazine’s message and approach, even amid changes in political climate and University life.“From the onset — back in 1972, because of some visionary leadership at the time — Notre Dame Magazine dealt with the tough questions. The very first cover asked, ‘Who Lives and Who Decides?’. It had articles on abortion and euthanasia and capital punishment,” Temple said. “It was still a pretty edgy publication when I joined the staff [in 1981], and I think that reputation endures to a certain degree. And the questions posed are perennial; we’re still asking them.”Since becoming editor in 1995, Temple said he has worked to maintain the focus and esteem of Notre Dame Magazine, which circulates approximately 150,000 copies during each quarterly publication.“Its philosophy is essentially the same,” he said. “It reflects a university that takes on difficult questions, that is engaged with the world, tells stories of alumni engaged in that world and addresses complicated issues that our readers confront in their lives.”Temple said he envisions the future of Notre Dame Magazine as running in tandem with that of the University, moving toward a global scope.“I’d like the magazine to contribute more to the international conversation on all manner of topics because that’s exciting and that is consistent with the University’s aspirations,” he said.Tags: Kerry Temple, Notre Dame, Notre Dame Magazine, publishinglast_img read more

Read More →

We Are 9 to encourage fossil fuel divestment

first_imgWednesday afternoon, the We Are 9 environmental campaign will present a petition with more than 1,000 signatures calling for Notre Dame to divest from fossil fuels to University President Fr. John Jenkins.“Divestment means removing investments from certain companies, in this case fossil fuel companies,” freshman Kathleen Rocks said.Rocks is involved in We Are 9, which began in the fall of 2013 and, according to its website, is a “sustainability movement that integrates the voices of the entire Notre Dame community, including undergraduate students, faculty, graduate students and clergy.”“As most students know, Notre Dame has a significant endowment, worth about 9.8 billion,” Rocks said. “Somewhere between 12 and 20 percent of that endowment is invested in fossil fuels companies — anything from shale, fracking, oil to natural gas corporations.“We’re asking Fr. Jenkins and the investment office to reinvest the money currently invested in fossil fuel companies into sustainable and green companies.”At 4:30 p.m., the group will assemble outside the Main Building and then proceed to Jenkins’s office to deliver the petitions.“As privileged members of society here at Notre Dame, we have been given much and therefore much is expected of us,” We Are 9 leader, senior Garrett Blad said. “This is a small way to show President Jenkins the concern of the Notre Dame community.“The We Are 9 campaign is a climate justice movement. Climate change is disproportionately harming poor, indigenous and minority communities. We have seen this in natural disasters such as Hurricane Sandy and Typhoon Haiyan and with all of the droughts, floods, wildfires and diseases that are happening right now across the globe,” Blad said.We Are 9 takes its name from the statistic predicting approximately nine billion people will live on Earth by 2050.“Climate change is a matter of social justice and human rights, because those who are most adversely affected by environmental degradation are those who are already most poor and vulnerable — those who are least responsible for over-consumption and pollution,” senior Katie Otterbeck said.Working closely with Blad, Otterbeck helped launch the We Are 9 campaign and has continued pursuing a variety of goals over the past several months.“I think that some people have a deeper sense of biophilia instilled in them naturally than others do, and for me this love of and respect for the natural world has translated into environmental advocacy … acknowledging that the disastrous effects of global warming on all earth’s precious species and ecosystems can be stopped if we work together,” Otterbeck said.Tags: divestment, fossil fuels, Fr. John Jenkins, Garrett Blad, Katie Otterbeck, We are 9last_img read more

Read More →

Mary Galvin named dean of College of Science

first_imgMary Galvin, director for the Division of Materials Research in the National Science Foundation (NSF) since 2013, will assume the role of William K. Warren Foundation Dean of the College of Science on Aug. 17, the University announced Tuesday.Before working at NSF, Galvin previously served as member of the technical staff of Bell Laboratories, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Delaware, as well as the technical lead for the development of new electroactive organic products at Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., according to the press release.A fellow in the American Physical Society, Galvin will also be appointed professor in chemistry and biochemistry.University President Fr. John Jenkins said Galvin’s wide range of experiences helped distinguish her in the search for a new leader of the College of Science.“After a nationwide search, Mary Galvin rose to the top from among many outstanding candidates as the person to lead our College of Science into the future,” Jenkins said in the press release. “She brings leadership experience in various realms, an entrepreneurial spirit and a commitment to Notre Dame’s mission, all of which make her an ideal leader for the College and the University.“We welcome her and look forward to many years of close collaboration.”Thomas Burish, the University’s Charles and Jilly Fischer Provost, cited her research experience as having the potential to have a large impact on research within the College of Science.“Mary Galvin has a wealth of research, teaching and mentoring and leadership experiences in academia, industry and government,” he said in the press release. “She combines these with high standards, an impressive work ethic, the ability to relate to disparate disciplines and research areas and a strong belief in Notre Dame’s Catholic identity. I speak on behalf of the entire search committee in expressing our enthusiasm about and gratitude for her agreeing to serve as dean.”Galvin reiterated the importance of scientific research and its broader impact.“Fundamental science is critical to solving many of the problems faced by society and the nation,” she said. “I believe the College of Science faculty will play a significant role in producing this knowledge.”Galvin will succeed Gregory Crawford as dean as he takes on the role as vice president and associate provost on July 1.Tags: College of Science, mary galvinlast_img read more

Read More →

Lecture explores environmentalism in ‘Laudato si’’

first_imgWhile Earth Day only has a history of 45 years, the Catholic Church’s value of environmentalism grounded in Genesis extends back 3,400 years, Dan Misleh said in his lecture titled, “Praised Be, USA: Embracing and Acting on ‘Laudato si’.’”The lecture, given Wednesday night in Geddes Hall, was presented by the Center for Social Concerns as part of a series of talks on “Laudato si’” The talk explored Pope Francis’ recent encyclical and the work Misleh’s organization is doing to spread awareness about the pope’s message. Misleh is the founding executive director of Catholic Climate Covenant, a group he developed out of his own house.There are a number of national Catholic organizations that work to serve the environment, and Catholic Climate Covenant strives to collaborate with and help organize the efforts of these bodies and the bishops’ conference, Misleh said.“When we first started the organization, we thought, ‘It doesn’t make sense for us to try to build a whole new infrastructure when we can work through the existing infrastructure to implement climate change activities,’” Misleh said.Among the activities of the Catholic Climate Covenant is the St. Francis Pledge, Misleh said, which calls for prayer, action and advocacy from those who take it. Misleh said the pledge has already had substantial success in the Catholic educational community.“I think we have about 22,000 Catholic individuals [and] … 25, 26 or 27 Catholic colleges and universities, including Notre Dame, that have taken the St. Francis Pledge,” he said.“Laudato si’,” the Papal encyclical released in May 2015 that calls for stewardship of the Earth, echoes many things said about the importance of the environment by Pope Francis’ predecessors in a blunter language, Misleh said.“It’s for everybody,” Misleh said about “Laudato si’.” “It’s meant to be a teaching document for everyone. Not just Catholics, not just bishops.”Misleh said Pope Francis used strong language in the encyclical when describing the effects of pollution on the Earth, including phrases such as “immense pile of filth.” Such strong language, Misleh said, is rarely seen in papal encyclicals.In spreading the message of the encyclical, Catholic Climate Covenant focused on raising public awareness of the document by working with several major stakeholders, such as the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the U.S. Military and fellow environmental groups, many of which were not faith-centered, Misleh said. Between the time of the encyclical’s release and the pope’s visit in September, Catholic Climate Covenant did a series of press events surrounding “Laudato si’.”Misleh said it is key to convey the message of“Laudato si’” and the goals of environmentalism through persuasion and conversion of viewpoints, highlighting the importance of nature in the lives of individuals.“There are places that we can go back to that we all probably remember. Perhaps it was even a profound experience of meeting God in that sacred place,” Misleh said. “Oftentimes, those places are outdoors.”Tags: Catholic Climate Covenant, Dan Misleh, encyclical, environment, laudato si’, Popelast_img read more

Read More →

Students fundraise to find cure for cancer

first_imgTags: cancer, Memorial Hospital, St. Baldricks, the bald and the beautiful Across Notre Dame’s campus, students are contributing more than money this week to find a cure for cancer.According to co-chair Lindsey Paris, the Bald and the Beautiful raises funds and awareness for pediatric cancer research.“Now in our eighth year as an event, The Bald and The Beautiful has raised nearly $265,000 for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation and Memorial Children’s Hospital of South Bend,” she said in an email. “We offer head shaving, hair donations, and colored hair extensions. Our hair extensions come in the colors of different cancer ribbons, so students and community members can honor family and friends who have fought a specific kind of cancer. The extensions are 1 for $10, 2 for $20, or 3 for $25.“All funds raised to shave heads supports the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, all hair extension purchases support Memorial Children’s Hospital of South Bend, and all hair is donated to Pantene Beautiful Lengths. This year, we are hoping to bring our total of funds donated to $300,000.”Paris said the organization is hosting several fundraising events this year.“Last Wednesday, we had our graduate student event at Legends. Students from the Law School and chemistry program, among others, participated by shaving their heads and donating their hair. We raised $900.86 at that event,” she said. “April 12, we hosted a baseball event at the Notre Dame versus Chicago State game. We haven’t totaled donations from that event yet, but we are looking forward to working with them in the feature.“Our main event takes place April 13 through 15 from 4 p.m. – 9 p.m. — [until] 8 p.m. on Friday — in LaFortune Student Center in the Dooley and Sorin Rooms. Students can register online at bald.nd.edu to shave their heads or donate their hair, and walk-ins are welcome for hair extensions.”Paris said nearly six percent of the Notre Dame student body participated in the fundraiser last year.“Our advisor, Dr. David Veselik, shaves his head every year in a large science lecture class. This year, he shaved his head in Jennifer Robichaud’s Parasitology class,” she said. “Each year, families from the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Program at Memorial Children’s Hospital visit our event. This year, Dr. Michael Ferguson, a pediatric hematologist-oncologist at Memorial, shaved his head to raise funds for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation.”Paris said the event is sponsored by University Edge, the Notre Dame College of Science, McGraw-Hill Education, the Notre Dame Club of the Tri-State, Einstein Bros. Bagels, Duncan Hall and Badin Hall.“The stylists volunteering their time are from Great Clips, University Hair Stylists, Tru Salon-Spa, Cilantro Hair Spa and Bangs,” she said.Sophomore Dani L’Heureux plans to part with several inches of hair Thursday.“This is an important cause to support because everyone who has gone through or is currently facing such a difficult disease like cancer deserves to be recognized and shown support from as many people as possible,” she said.“This event means the world to me because in a few weeks will be the one-year anniversary of my mom being told she’s cancer-free. She’s the strongest influence in my life and her strength during her battle inspires me every day. I’m cutting my hair and raising money in honor of her and cancer fighters and survivors everywhere, as well as those who have lost their battles.”Senior Morgan Faley, who cut off eight inches of her hair Wednesday, said The Bald and the Beautiful is “a wonderful event that benefits great causes.”“They welcome monetary donations, but also allow people to cut their hair without having to donate. Since many of us are college students on a budget, this is a great way for students to support the cause and make an impact,” she said. “It’s always fun to see everyone’s reactions to seeing their ponytail after its cut off.”Sophomore Paul Stevenson said this was his first time participating in the fundraiser.“I’ve never had a buzzcut and the thought of getting one last year was terrifying, but this year it was something I was considering doing all semester,” he said. “I cut off as much as I had. Not sure the exact length. It wasn’t enough to donate — minimum eight inches — but it was 10 solid months of work without haircuts.”Stevenson said he has a personal interest in the fundraiser.“Being from Memphis, Tennessee, home of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, I’ve seen firsthand the impact that positive cancer research can have,” he said. “Additionally, my cousin was diagnosed with leukemia several years ago, but with the help of St. Jude, he survived and is perfectly healthy now. If doing something as simple as cutting your hair can make a difference like that, the choice is easy for me. It’s the least I could do.”Sophomore Sara Dugan said she is attempting to cut off nine inches of her hair for the fundraiser.“The Bald and the Beautiful is fantastic because it unites the student body behind a cause that means something to everyone here. The event means a lot to me because of the people in my life who have been affected by cancer and other diseases related to hair loss. It takes incredible strength to survive through a life-threatening illness,” she said. “It’s the least I can do to chop off some of my hair to support them. It will grow back.”last_img read more

Read More →

College welcomes alumna as Holy Cross Hall director

first_imgWhen Elizabeth Palmer graduated Saint Mary’s in 2013, she knew she wanted to return to the College some day. This year, she will do just that when she becomes the hall director for Holy Cross Hall.Palmer graduated in 2013 with degrees in biology and psychology. Though she took some time away from the college, Palmer has worked at the College before as a lab instructor and as an assistant lacrosse coach..“My dream has always been to come back to Saint Mary’s,” she said. “Saint Mary’s is my favorite place in the world.” Palmer said she feels her education and experiences will make her a good fit for her job as hall director.“I’m pursuing a master of divinity and through that I feel like I can meet people where they are and encounter others and experience diversity,” she said. “So I thought this specific job was a great way to come back and be somewhere I love, while encountering the community and being in solidarity with students by living in the dorm.”Palmer said her first duty as hall director is to establish herself as a resource for students who want to talk with someone who can empathize with them.“The most profound and significant piece of the job is just being a resource for students on campus and being a place where students can come to,” she said. “Whether they’re struggling or succeeding, I can be a support to them. When I was here as a student, I wasn’t a person who sought out their hall director. I want to become a resource because I’m living here on campus too. I get what [students] are experiencing so we can talk about life.”Palmer said her duties include cultivating an engaging and welcoming environment for residents, as well as providing opportunities for growth and development among resident advisors. “This place is home and how do you cultivate home? By making sure everyone is experiencing home in a unique way that is a good fit for them,” she said. “We also help with the growth and development of the RAs. We have weekly meetings with them and also one-on-one meetings.”Palmer said she is excited to immerse herself in a part of Saint Mary’s campus and history she has not previously experienced. “I lived in Regina for two years and then Le Mans for two years, so I never lived in Holy Cross Hall when I went here,” she said. “Getting to return and live in a completely new building has allowed me to embrace the history of the College more, since [Holy Cross Hall] is the oldest building on campus. I’m a history buff when it comes to Saint Mary’s. I love the history of this place and love being close to the Sisters of the Holy Cross. Coming back, I’ve really understood the mission of the College more as an alumna and I understand the Sisters’ impact. I get to live out the mission in a new way.”Palmer said through her job as hall director, she will work alongside her previous mentors, and this is one of her greatest blessings. “It’s such a gift and a blessing because the same people who allowed me to grow as a person and develop as a person are still empowering me,” she said. “It is the greatest gift to be around this community that has supported me since I was eighteen, and now to come back at twenty-six and have them still supporting me is amazing.”Palmer said although she wants to be seen as a friendly face among residents, faculty and students, she still wants to create a professional environment.“I think coming back, I definitely want to establish myself as a professional because it is weird, being a student then coming back to work here,” she said. “I feel Saint Mary’s is going to help me learn how to be a professional and help me see what that looks like.”Palmer said she wants Saint Mary’s students to know that the spirit of the College follows students, even after graduation.“As an alumna, something I would tell students is, you think Saint Mary’s is the best four years of your life, and the most beautiful thing is that Saint Mary’s doesn’t end after four years,” she said. “Even after being away from South Bend — I’ve been in graduate school for the past two years and have travelled and seen many different parts of the world — I still feel like Saint Mary’s is apart of me no matter where I am. Saint Mary’s transcends the community and transcends the borders of South Bend.” Tags: Alumni, Hall Director, Holy Cross Hall, residence hallslast_img read more

Read More →

Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s students offer perspectives on immigration, DACA

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer A group of students holds up signs on Sept. 12, portraying their support for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a policy allowing children of undocumented migrants in the United States to work and study.Two days later, on Nov. 16, College President Jan Cervelli took a sign demonstrating her support for undocumented students — as well as support for Saint Mary’s becoming a sanctuary campus — from a group of students handing them out in Le Mans Hall.One year later, the University and College administrations have continued to support undocumented students, but the stakes are higher. On Sept. 5, the Trump administration announced plans to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which allows children of undocumented migrants in the United States to work and study. Trump gave the House and Senate a six-month deadline to pass legislation to replace DACA, but over two months later there is no plan in place to do so.Notre Dame junior Gargi Purohit, a beneficiary of DACA and president of the Student Coalition for Immigration Advocacy, said while she appreciates the support she has received from the University community, she wants to see more action from the administration in terms of protecting undocumented students at Notre Dame.“I think the University, while they have showed that they’ve cared for us, I think that they need to start making plans for us before something bad happens,” Purohit said. “So we met with the Notre Dame administration right after the news of DACA — like the day after — and they told us their plans, which was just so frustrating because we asked them in a meeting the entire year before after Trump got elected, ‘What’s your plan?’ and they finally got back to us.”Given the administration’s timing thus far, Purohit said she is concerned that any protection for DACA students will be put in place too late.“I really want them to move at a faster pace and not divulge what their plan is after DACA [gets] taken away,” she said. “And, God forbid, after … one of our parents or one of us gets detained, that’s when they really start taking action. So they’re capable of doing so much more, and I think they need to go a lot faster than the pace going on right now, and not wait until the last minute after something bad happens.”Protests and petitions among students have also become less prevalent in the year since Trump’s election and his announcement about DACA. Saint Mary’s junior Teresa Brickey, who hopes to pursue a career in immigration law, said students are instead turning to other movements to seek actual influence on policy.“[Last year], I was a part of that, going out and protesting, getting people together,” she said. “This year, I haven’t seen it so much. I’m at the point where I don’t want to act upon initial feelings anymore. I want to do something only if it’s fruitful. It’s still important to protest — I’m definitely not disregarding that — but I don’t want to just put words on cardboard and go out and stand. Rather, we should be calling senators and being active participants in our democracy.”While most of the public response to DACA being rescinded has taken the form of support for those affected by the decision at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, there are students who take a more conservative stance on DACA and other issues of immigration.Notre Dame junior Jeffrey Murphy, treasurer of the College Republicans, said he wishes Trump hadn’t given legislators a six-month timeframe in which to replace DACA.“I think he should’ve ended it overnight, and if Congress wants to act, Congress can act,” Murphy said.While Murphy said he is comfortable expressing his views on DACA, Saint Mary’s senior Christina Herrera, who approves of DACA’s repeal, said the College’s campus is less open to conservative opinions.“I felt like I was being targeted in class when I would speak out against DACA just because it doesn’t really help anyone,” she said. “The point of it is to have them stay here, and we need permanent legislation, not something temporary again that you’re going to have to renew in another six months or 12 months. I think a lot of people who are very pro-DACA or are here for DACA don’t want to hear that, because they just automatically think you’re against them.”Purohit said she has trouble hearing out people who are against DACA because she believes they are often misinformed.“At this point, I’m really debating on whether I need to listen to the other side because often times I hear the other side, and it’s all just misconceptions,” she said. “There aren’t a lot of facts. It’s all really prominently based on myths and on hate, so I really wish, given this current climate on politics and given how much damage Trump has done to so many areas, I wish people would really take their time and learn about how the politics are really affecting students.”While Murphy said DACA recipients are the only group of undocumented immigrants he feels “could receive special consideration,” he still wants to see Trump and Congress put “America first” on this issue.“On my list of wins and losses, DACA falls under a loss at the moment because we had the 15 minutes where Attorney General [Jeff] Sessions announced DACA was going to be rescinded, and I thought, brilliant,” he said. “ … [Trump] made very strong remarks that he was going to rescind DACA, but then he said things like DACA recipients shouldn’t worry and that Dreamers should — I think his quote was ‘rest easy.’ So then I’m thinking is he or isn’t he going to do what he promised, which was put American interests first.”Brickey, however, believes allowing the country to benefit from the contributions of undocumented immigrants is putting America first.“Undocumented students, professors and community members are still just as important to this community at Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame, Holy Cross, South Bend, our country on a broader scale, as I am or citizens are,” Brickey said. “They’re contributing in ways that we may not see or know because we don’t see their work every day. … Their contributions are just as important as my own.”Herrera said this is an emotional view to take and that she thinks immigrants can achieve citizenship through proper channels.“I’m Hispanic, and I have friends that are affected by DACA … and there are immigrants in my family, so I understand why it’s so emotional,” she said. “I could never imagine having my parents there one day, and then they’re gone the next, so I totally understand that. … I’m against [undocumented] immigration just because there are people who have worked so hard to get here legally.”An additional argument that Murphy said is less reasonable than it initially seems to be is that children should not be punished for their parents’ crimes.“There are plenty of children that suffer because their parents commit crimes,” Murphy said. “Like the Enron executives — their children are paying the price for their parents committing crimes. Bernie Madoff’s kid killed himself because the repercussions of his father’s illegal activity were so harsh. So when your parent commits a crime, there are going to be repercussions and children are going to have to pay the price. That’s true for American criminals and that’s true for illegal alien criminals.”Purohit said she has resigned herself to the idea that Notre Dame’s campus — and beyond — will remain split on the issues of immigration and DACA.“I think there are just always going to be people on the other side that will always just stay there,” she said. “And I don’t think that they’ll ever really try to understand the other side and really try to listen to these stories and do their own research and hear the facts, and I think it’s just always going to be filled with hate. And to be quite frank, I don’t really care about the other side or whatever decisions they personally choose to make.”Herrera said other students’ perception of her opinion — which may oppose the beliefs of many others on campus — does not affect her.“It’s not going to matter at the end of the day if this girl doesn’t like me because of my stance on immigration,” she said.Tags: DACA, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Donald Trump, Immigration, political climate, Politics Editor’s note: This is the second story in a three-part series addressing various political issues and their impact at Notre Dame one year after the 2016 election. Today’s story focuses on immigration and student perspectives on the DACA repeal.Less than a week after the 2016 election, University President Fr. John Jenkins held an interfaith prayer service during which he promised undocumented students at Notre Dame that they have the full support of the University.“You accepted our invitation to come to Notre Dame,” he said at the prayer service held Nov. 14, 2016. “You are part of our family. We will do everything we can to ensure that you complete your education, and you are supported in every way possible.”last_img read more

Read More →

Blais, Shewit, Juneja reflect on year in office

first_imgDiane Park | The Observer Shewit said she was proud of their year in office.“I do feel like we expanded what student government works on,” she said. “Student government is totally different than it’s been past years, and I think it’s made it more effective. Just looking at the group of students that we’ve worked with, both individuals and clubs, too, I would say that more students feel that student government is a place they can go to have their issues represented.”An important change implemented in the past year, Blais said, was a restructuring of the executive cabinet. There were previously 17 cabinet departments; that number has now been reduced to 14. Under the old system, every department consisted only of a director and members; now, every department has a commissioner between the directors and members. Blais said this move created a “structure of accountability” because it means that more people have responsibility and projects get spread out.Junior Prathm Juneja, the outgoing student government chief of staff, said this spirit of inclusivity has defined the efforts of the administration.“Student government is now a place for everyone,” he said. “Probably the most important thing to the three of us during this year was including every voice. So, when I kind of reflect and think about our time as well as the University moving forward, what I’m thinking about is ‘Have we made Notre Dame a more inclusive place?’ I think we have.”Shewit emphasized this fight for inclusion when she said that one of her proudest accomplishments of the administration was the advocacy done on behalf of DACA recipients. As a product of an unforeseen political event, these efforts were not discussed in the platform Blais and Shewit ran on last spring.“This wasn’t a platform goal of ours, but everything that we did surrounding DACA, I think that’s probably what I’m most proud of, just because it was something we didn’t expect to be such a big part of our year,” Shewit said. “Kind of what Prathm was saying about how representing every student was so important. And I think that was our first opportunity to really stand by those words.”Blais acknowledged that some policies discussed on the ticket’s platform were not ultimately implemented. However, she said this was due to the fact that upon further research and consultation with students, it was determined that the policies were not necessary or could be approached in a more effective way. She also said that some successful programs, such as “town hall on the go,” in which Blais and Shewit visited every dorm on campus and gathered feedback and ideas, were not proposed in the platform but formulated later.“While we didn’t accomplish every single item we sought out to do, we found a better way to do it,” Blais said.In addition to concrete policy accomplishments, Shewit said she was proud of the work the administration did to start important conversations on-campus.“I think the biggest thing change I’ve seen is the number of hard conversations that take place within student government, and then the number of hard conversations that either start in student government and then are encouraged to take place in the classroom, or with different clubs, or just among students, that’s probably the biggest change,” Shewit said. “ … We had conversations surrounding sexual assault, DACA, the murals, representation. In the past, I feel like the biggest time for these conversations were through the board reports, but now I feel like they are almost every day.”Juneja said that he thinks that this principle can also be applied to the issue of inclusion.“I think conversations about inclusion were, at least during my first two years at Notre Dame, very much isolated into the groups that felt like we didn’t belong,” he said. “To see that conversations of inclusion are happening with a bunch of students who aren’t falling into the category who would be personally affected by that issue and continuously having hard conversations about that is definitely something I take a lot of happiness and a lot of pride in.”An email was sent to the student body on Tuesday with a list of policies and accomplishments of the administration. Blais said the positive reaction to the email made her reflect on the ability of people to make changes.“I’ve had a few conversations with people about our email that we just sent out,” she said. “The response that I got from it is exactly what I want people to remember: the idea that you can make a difference. Any student can come to this University and make a change in what they care about or on behalf of others. And that, I think, has fueled us in our time in student government and I hope it’s a wave that continues and I hope it’s something that people remember this term for. A lot of students got to make a difference.”Blais, Shewit and Juneja also expressed gratitude for the opportunity to lead the student body over the past year and build a better, more inclusive campus community.“The biggest thing I think I’ve taken away from these past four years, but especially this year in office, is that it’s very OK to not be OK with things,” Shewit said. “I love Notre Dame, but that doesn’t mean I have to be OK with every aspect of Notre Dame. Instead of sitting on that anger, I think I found an avenue to work on those issues. I’m so amazed at how many students care at this school. We love Notre Dame, and people dedicate so much time to making this a better place … and I feel so grateful to have had the chance to work alongside the students, and I hope that’s something that will continue to grow, that we’ll continue to work towards a Notre Dame that is inclusive for everyone.”Blais said she is thankful for her time as student body president.“I’m just so incredibly grateful for this experience and for the people who believed in us last year and elected us, and for everyone in the student body who has played a role and just everyone who is a student here who even if they never met us, even if they never looked at a student government event or initiative… they’re the core,” Blais said. “Everybody at this University is the core of why it works and why it functions so I’m just really thankful for the opportunity to serve this University and to get to know so many of its wonderful members.” Diane Park | The Observer Shewit said she was proud of their year in office.“I do feel like we expanded what student government works on,” she said. “Student government is totally different than it’s been past years, and I think it’s made it more effective. Just looking at the group of students that we’ve worked with, both individuals and clubs, too, I would say that more students feel that student government is a place they can go to have their issues represented.”An important change implemented in the past year, Blais said, was a restructuring of the executive cabinet. There were previously 17 cabinet departments; that number has now been reduced to 14. Under the old system, every department consisted only of a director and members; now, every department has a commissioner between the directors and members. Blais said this move created a “structure of accountability” because it means that more people have responsibility and projects get spread out.Junior Prathm Juneja, the outgoing student government chief of staff, said this spirit of inclusivity has defined the efforts of the administration.“Student government is now a place for everyone,” he said. “Probably the most important thing to the three of us during this year was including every voice. So, when I kind of reflect and think about our time as well as the University moving forward, what I’m thinking about is ‘Have we made Notre Dame a more inclusive place?’ I think we have.”Shewit emphasized this fight for inclusion when she said that one of her proudest accomplishments of the administration was the advocacy done on behalf of DACA recipients. As a product of an unforeseen political event, these efforts were not discussed in the platform Blais and Shewit ran on last spring.“This wasn’t a platform goal of ours, but everything that we did surrounding DACA, I think that’s probably what I’m most proud of, just because it was something we didn’t expect to be such a big part of our year,” Shewit said. “Kind of what Prathm was saying about how representing every student was so important. And I think that was our first opportunity to really stand by those words.”Blais acknowledged that some policies discussed on the ticket’s platform were not ultimately implemented. However, she said this was due to the fact that upon further research and consultation with students, it was determined that the policies were not necessary or could be approached in a more effective way. She also said that some successful programs, such as “town hall on the go,” in which Blais and Shewit visited every dorm on campus and gathered feedback and ideas, were not proposed in the platform but formulated later.“While we didn’t accomplish every single item we sought out to do, we found a better way to do it,” Blais said.In addition to concrete policy accomplishments, Shewit said she was proud of the work the administration did to start important conversations on-campus.“I think the biggest thing change I’ve seen is the number of hard conversations that take place within student government, and then the number of hard conversations that either start in student government and then are encouraged to take place in the classroom, or with different clubs, or just among students, that’s probably the biggest change,” Shewit said. “ … We had conversations surrounding sexual assault, DACA, the murals, representation. In the past, I feel like the biggest time for these conversations were through the board reports, but now I feel like they are almost every day.”Juneja said that he thinks that this principle can also be applied to the issue of inclusion.“I think conversations about inclusion were, at least during my first two years at Notre Dame, very much isolated into the groups that felt like we didn’t belong,” he said. “To see that conversations of inclusion are happening with a bunch of students who aren’t falling into the category who would be personally affected by that issue and continuously having hard conversations about that is definitely something I take a lot of happiness and a lot of pride in.”An email was sent to the student body on Tuesday with a list of policies and accomplishments of the administration. Blais said the positive reaction to the email made her reflect on the ability of people to make changes.“I’ve had a few conversations with people about our email that we just sent out,” she said. “The response that I got from it is exactly what I want people to remember: the idea that you can make a difference. Any student can come to this University and make a change in what they care about or on behalf of others. And that, I think, has fueled us in our time in student government and I hope it’s a wave that continues and I hope it’s something that people remember this term for. A lot of students got to make a difference.”Blais, Shewit and Juneja also expressed gratitude for the opportunity to lead the student body over the past year and build a better, more inclusive campus community.“The biggest thing I think I’ve taken away from these past four years, but especially this year in office, is that it’s very OK to not be OK with things,” Shewit said. “I love Notre Dame, but that doesn’t mean I have to be OK with every aspect of Notre Dame. Instead of sitting on that anger, I think I found an avenue to work on those issues. I’m so amazed at how many students care at this school. We love Notre Dame, and people dedicate so much time to making this a better place … and I feel so grateful to have had the chance to work alongside the students, and I hope that’s something that will continue to grow, that we’ll continue to work towards a Notre Dame that is inclusive for everyone.”Blais said she is thankful for her time as student body president.“I’m just so incredibly grateful for this experience and for the people who believed in us last year and elected us, and for everyone in the student body who has played a role and just everyone who is a student here who even if they never met us, even if they never looked at a student government event or initiative… they’re the core,” Blais said. “Everybody at this University is the core of why it works and why it functions so I’m just really thankful for the opportunity to serve this University and to get to know so many of its wonderful members.”Tags: 2018 Commencement, Becca Blais, Commencement 2018, sibonay shewit, Student government, year in review,“I would say I feel really fulfilled,” Blais said. “When I think about the past year, the moments that have been standing out to me the most are the conversations and the meetings with people who I had never encountered before, but they brought something forward and we were able to start working on it right away. We didn’t do things traditionally, and it was definitely a risk, but it worked.” “I would say I feel really fulfilled,” Blais said. “When I think about the past year, the moments that have been standing out to me the most are the conversations and the meetings with people who I had never encountered before, but they brought something forward and we were able to start working on it right away. We didn’t do things traditionally, and it was definitely a risk, but it worked.”center_img Editor’s note: A version of this story appeared in the print edition of The Observer on April 6.When outgoing student body president Becca Blais and outgoing vice president Sibonay Shewit, both seniors, ran for office a year ago, their slogan was “Reach, Reinvent, Represent.” Reflecting on their year in office as their term draws to a close, Blais and Shewit agreed they had succeeded in reforming the way student government operated as well as making it more accessible for students.last_img read more

Read More →

Archbishop calls for greater Catholic influence in Europe

first_imgArchbishop Paul Richard Gallagher, the secretary for relations with states for the Holy See, called for the Church to reinstate its moral presence in European politics in a lecture titled “The Catholic Church in the European Project” on Tuesday night in the Eck Visitors Center.The talk was presented as part of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies’ annual Keely Lecture, which invites representatives from the Vatican to speak about the Church’s Catholic mission.Gallagher opened the lecture by discussing the importance of looking to history to understand Europe’s present crises, referencing Pope Francis’ address to European heads of state and government.“As the Holy Father expressed, we cannot understand our times apart from the past,” he said.“ … Without such an awareness, humanity loses a sense of the meaning of its activity and its progress towards the future.”Gallagher said many new cultural and political developments have caused Europe to stray from its Christian roots.“There is a loss of Europe’s Christian memory and heritage, accompanied by a kind of practical agnosticism and religious indifference,” he said.Gallagher said this mentality poses a danger to all aspects of European life.“If it does not recognize its roots, then Europe deceives itself into thinking it possesses a vitality,” he said. “Thus reducing its immense human, artistic, technical, social, political, economic and religious heritage into a mere museum piece of the past, rather than the lifeblood of the present.”In recent years, the European Union has begun to reinforce this trend by exaggerating individual-centric rights in place of those that promote unity and solidarity, he added.“Today there is a tendency to claim ever-broader individual rights,” Gallagher said.“ … Underlying this is a conception of the human person as detached from all social and anthropological constructs.”Gallagher said this ideology has caused an “existential fragmentation” marked by “loneliness and individualism” to embed itself in European society.This phenomenon has manifested itself in Europe’s declining birth rate as well as its struggling job market, he added.Gallagher said this growing individualism has caused a widespread skepticism towards the European Union and, consequently, the reemergence of nationalism within its nations.“When solidarity is absent, it becomes difficult to work to build the common good in society,” he added.The importance of seeing the humanity behind the crises Europe faces today is crucial in combating this mentality, Gallagher said.“Perhaps the greatest contribution that Christians can make to today’s Europe is to remind her that she is not a mass of statistics or institutions but is made up of people,” he said. “ …The main task for the Church in contemporary Europe is to place the human person in the center.”To do so, he added, the Church ought to regain its guiding role in European politics and encourage its nations to promote an attitude of solidarity within one another.The Church must “be to the world what the soul is to the body,” he said. “… A moral voice, to revive its memory and to indicate an ideal horizon for life.”Tags: Keely Lecture Series, Nanovic Institute for European Studies, Paul Richard Gallagherlast_img read more

Read More →